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June 1979 $2.50 




28 Add Digital Display for $50 

— 100-Hz accuracy. K4IQJ 

32 High-Performance Receiver Add-Ons 

— aren't ICs wonderful? W5DA 

38 A Solution to the Home-Brew 
Housing Shortage 

— building a box for your next project ..... W0IHI 

42 How Do You Use ICs? 

-part XI WA2SUT7NNN*ZVB 

46 Customize Your HT144B 

— some nifty mods, W2KGV 

50 Ultra-Simple CMOS Logic Probe 

— a single IC does it all. . . WB9PHM 

54 "The Voice of Wolf Creek" 

-the KGCX story W6CK 

60 CB to 10 

-part XIX: Lafayette SSB rigs WB0 LLP/5 

64 At Last! A Really Simple Speech 
Processor 

-^5 dB for S10. W9UT, WB90EC 

66 New Life for Tube-Type Dippers 

— simple circuit reads out on your 

frequency counter. K4LJA 

68 You Ought To Be in Pictures 

— here's what the guys on 14,230 are 

doing. , . IC4TW| 

72 How to Toot Your Own Horn 

— and stay on key WA4CLC 

76 A Junk-Box HT Charger 

— power to the portables ,,..,,., WB9JLY 

80 Protect Your Home-Brew Panels 

— no more spraying VE2BVW 



86 [2 Now You Can Possess Instant 
Recall 

— don't tell 'em the computer 

helped WB5UTJ/N5AUX 

92 |2 Calcu-Trip 

— a program for the open road. . , , , Lutz 

94 Charging Up the WE-800 

— a convenient alternative. ... , . . * . K7CMS 

96 Where Have All the kHz Gone? 

— are ham bands an endangered 

species?. ...*.-. - W8CI 

100 The Ramsey 2m Amp Kit 

— has a high Watts-per-dollar ratio N8RK 

108 An Improved Display for the TR-7400A 

— very sensible WA6AVJ 

110 Inexpensive Scope Tuner 

-"budget here is QRP, OM" ...... VE7CGK 

112 The Resistance Substitution Box 

— a ham's forgotten friend 

WA2SUT/NNN0ZVB 

126 Vodka Amongst the Penguins 

—hamming with the Russians in 

Antarctica , W1FK 

138 Protect Yourself with a GFI 

— before it's too late WA6PEC 

142 Poor Man's CW Memory 

—works even with a straight key WB0RYN 

146 Power Up for Mobile Operation 

— adding an auxiliary battery WB9SKX 

148 Project Update 

—doubled capacity for K20AW / s 

repeater IDer K20AW 



Never Say Die— 4, Looking West— 6, Letters— 12, Microcomputer Interfacing— 14, Contests— 18, Faces, Places— 19, RTTY 
Loop- 20, DX-22, New Products- 24, Ham Help- 25, 26, 156, 157, 163, Social Events- 26, Dealer Directory -70, OSCAR Or- 
bits- 157, Corrections- 157, FCC- 163, Propagation- 193 



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At Henty Radio we know how to build only one kind 
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Its heavy duty components guarantee years of 
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The 1KD-5 is a 1200 watt PEP input (700 
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^ Pi L plate circuit with a rotary silver plated tank coil tor greatest 
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A high quality linear amplifier designed for 
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Th»s results in PEP output in excess of 2000 
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capable of furnishing 2000 watts of continuous 
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watts output 3 5-30 MHz. Price $1595. 

4K ULTRA* 

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*** Reader Service — see pegs 195 



Staff 



EDITORfPUBLlSHEB 
Wayne Green W2NSDM 

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT 
Sherry Smyths 

ASSISTANT PUBLISHER 
Jeffrey D. DeTray WB8BTHH 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 
Dotty Gibson 

MANAGING EDITOR 
John C. Burnett 

ASSISTANT MANAGING 

EDITOR 

Susan G. Phllbrlck 

NEWS EDITOB 

Gene Smarte WB6TOV/1 

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 

Elisabeth Slackmore 
Cynthia Smith 
Richard Phemx 

BOOK PUBLICATIONS 
Jim Perry 

PRODUCTION MANAGER 
Lynn Panclera-Fraser 

ART DEPARTMENT 

Judith Dalby 

Bob Drew 

James H, Gray II 

Bruce Hedin 

Chip Jackson 

Dion Owens 

Noel R. Self WB1ARP 

Robin M, Sloan 

John W. White 

PRINTING 
Gary Steinbach 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

Bill Heydolph 
Tedd Cluff 

TYPESETTING 
Barbara J. Latti 
Holly J Walsh 
David Dawe 

BOOKKEEPER 

Knud E.M.Keller KV4GGif1 

CIRCULATION 
Barbara Block 
Laura Barn tele 

DATA ENTRY 
Mary Kinzel 

Denise Loranger 

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING 
AND CIRCULATION 
Robert R LaPointe 

ASSISTANT CIRCULATION 

MANAGER 

Mary Betti Stanar 

BULK SALES MANAGER 
Judy Waterman 

SHIPPING 
Ethan Perry, Mgr. 
Bill Barry 

RECEPTIONIST 
Beth Smith 

ASSOCIATES 

Robert Baker WB2GFE 
E. H. Barnett WBflllX 
Schley Cox WB9LHO 
Tom DtBlase WB8KZD 
Terry Fox WB4JFI 
W, Sanger Green 
Dave Ingram K4TWJ 
Larry Kahaner WQ2NEL 
Joe Kasser G3ZCZ 
Bill Pasternak WA6ITF 
John Schultz W4FA 
Waller Scott K8DIZ 
Peter Stark K20AW 
Chuck Stuart N5KC 
Bill Turner WA&AB1 

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 
Richard J. Dykema 

CUSTOMER SERVICE 
Florence Goldman 

ADVERTISING 
Aline Coutu t Mgr. 
Bill York 
Nancy Clampa 
William Q. Hoyle 
Marcia Stone 
Gaye Halberg 
Lorl Mugford 
Rita Rivard 



W2HSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

editorial t>y Wayne Green 




GETTING THE CROWDS 

Dayton knows how to get 'em 
out by the thousands, but many 
other hamfests are floundering. 
Prizes are nice, but how many 
hams will drive 200 mi les to take 
a slight chance at winning a rig? 
Not many, If Dayton depended 
on the prizes to bring in the 
customers, the mobs would 
stay home. 

The more established ham* 
tests have to keep growing to 
survive. We've watched the 
bungling of SAROC into ob- 
scurity. It grew smaller and 
smaller every year, despite 
lavish prizes. Other hamfests 
have been withering for the lack 
of any hot spark to make them 
grow. 

There was a time in history 
when the ARRL had but to make 
a hamfest official and this 
would bring in the hams. Now 
few hams will drive across town 
to get to an ARRL forum, much 
less drive 200 miles. Those who 
have attended these dreary 



forums know what I'm talking 
about. They have been so or- 
chestrated that it is impossible 
for anything significant to hap- 
pen. Pompous officials get up 
and tell everyone how great the 
League is and how everything is 
really okay, no matter what any- 
one else says. End of meeting. 

ST. LOUIS 

The recent hamfest in St. 
Louis set an example of what 
can be done by a live-wire 
group. Bob Heil K9E1D called 
me up along in December and 
asked what he would have to do 
to get me to come out to St. 
Louis and give a talk to his club 
in Marissa, Illinois, I said it was 
simple— just put on a major 
hamfest and invite me. The next 
thing I knew he was doing just 
that. 

Bob got all except one club in 
the area together to sponsor the 
hamfest, threw in a computer- 
fest to boot, complete with 
some computer clubs, and ran a 
bang-up show. Bob contacted 




Signing a proclamation for Amateur Radio Day in St. Louis is Mayor 
Conway. From left to right are Larry Roberts W9MXC t Bob Hei! 
K9EID, Mayor Conway, and beaming me. 



the League, but they said he 
couldn't put on a hamfest with- 
out their support, and they had 
a long list of demands he had to 
meet to get their support. He 
decided to go it without them. 
The result was a superlative 
success. Over 3,000 hams 
thronged to the St. Louis Cer- 
vantes Exhibition Center, 
despite lousy weather. 

What pulled in such a big 
crowd? It wasn't any ads in 
QST, for there wasn't a hint 
about the show there* It was 
mentioned a lot in 73 , > . about 
the only place for many hams to 
get the word. But just reading 
about a hamfest and actually 
going are two different things. 
Something happened to break 
all those people loose and get 
them to drive to St. Louis. 
Despite a competing hamfest in 
Kansas, a large number of Kan- 
sas hams went right by there on 
their way to the St. Louis show, 

i think the difference between 
the shows is simple to explain. 
People will go to a show where 
they think they are going to 
have a good time. In this case, 
there was a controversial 
speaker— me— on tap to talk 
about things which really can't 
be published in the magazine. If 
hamfest committees would 
spend more time and effort get- 
ting speakers who wili make 
hams want to come to the ham- 
fests, they will have plenty of at- 
tendance. 

The ARRL convention in St. 
Paul had both me and Harry 
Dannals on the program. The 
committee running the conven- 
tion told me that they doubled 
the attendance by having me on 
the program. Sure, I like to hear 
that . . . but what this means is 
that the speaker is of great im- 
portance , . . greater than many 

Continued on page 760 



73 Magazine (ISSN 0098-9010^5 published monthly by 73, Inc., Pine Street, Peterborough NH 03458. Subscription rates in the U.S. and 
Canada are $18 for one year h and $45 for three years Outside the US, and Canada, writ© for rates. Second class postage paid at Peter- 
borough NH 0345a and at additional mailing offices. Publication No. 700420. Phone: 603-924-3873. Microfilm edition— University 
Mrcrofifm, Ann Arbor Ml 48106. Entire contents copyright 1979 by 73. Inc. INCLUDE OLD ADDRESS AND ZIP CODE WITH ADDRESS 
CHANGE NOTIFICATION and send to 73, Inc., Subscription Services Dept,, P.O. Box 931 r Farmingdale NY 11737, 



• I » ' 



r- - - - — 






. 



>> 





• 



■ 





Compact in size . . . 
big on performance! 

TR-762S 

Featuring 25 

rn-762' 

with memo 
-sigm I (80i ^1) 

Or i mol 

shack use When used wilt I RM 

M^ 'icess 'Urol Unit the TR-762 rs 

a whole new dimenBJm n'i i mi iTtory and 

scanning capatnl I 
TR-7600 
Looks ih 'no as f hi rfi but offers 10 

itfSttfl RF GMitpul (av. .11 low pCvft 

Also uses AM- 76 Microproi Iflt'l i 

the Amateur Operator w< Qklng for im 

versatility in a 2-metcr FM transceiver! 
RM-7G 

Combined wrtn eiiher the Tfi-7600 or TR-7625, 
this optional Microprocessor Control Unll »vs 
ihe operator to store frequencies m six memories 
(simple x/repeate/). scan all memory channels, 
automatically scan up the band m 5 kHz sit 
manually scjn up or down in 5-kHj stogie or f 
continuous steps set lower and an 

limits, clear scan if mining), slop scan 

iwith HOLD button) scan for busy or open 
channel, select repeater mode (simplex, iransr- 
-quency offsc kHz i one 

memory transmit jency Operates on U3 95 

MHz simple* (MARS) and is adapiabie to all MARS 
frequer-. Display indicates frequfc *iven 

while scanning) and Tunc (such ns autoscan 

lower scan f re qw .mi! upper < limit, and 

error irtting out of hand! 

T5-70QSP 

Here's an outstanding 2-m» i*mo 

transceiver lhat provides an f enscon of 

/ over ihe entire 2 meter band Featy 
packed and equipped for SSB FM CW and AM 

jilt -in digital frequency readout 
rer preamptitier VOX sidetc nd 

microphone 



SPECIFICATIONS 


Models TR /GOO/TH 7(>?[i* 


Model TS-7B0SP 


Mode] TR-B3O0 


Fiecfiiencj Range: 


144.00 Er> 147.595 M 


144 ft to MP 


TX 445.D to mi 
RX.44Z.Q to 447.0 MH; 


Mode; 


m 


SSB lUSft, LSty, CW, AM. FM 


FM 


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iBImm (f. Sri 6 iwidi 
Btmm (MM'') hfrjlj 
230mm (B~1M6') (leap 


"Irnin ftO-7/H") widu 
1?4iihn (4 :t\\ j high 

320mm (12-5/8") deep 


laDmm [7 t/lB"J wirig 

GQmm (MUG") ttigti 
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WeighL 


t 7Skg (H «6 lbs) Apprax 


M 0*8 (24 2 Iks) 


? .3 kg (5 1 lbs) 


HF Output Power: 


High. TUf*25) m\v, (mm i 
Luw t{»5) watt ipJJfOK 
im watU) 


. IM HW in .vi It:: 
AM 3w.!' 
FM (LOW) A|i|Mi:i • h 


High 10 walls 

Ld ft 1 wall Appro*. 


ModiifatiDii: 


Vf:» fffWlliJCft^ "11 


SSB: Balanced modulation 

Lile iefli 
Irpqu' nil 

mduJalian 


Variable rsictuie* jjhaL 


Microphone: 


Dynamic microphone wtlh 
PR Si 


Lo*v- impedance microphone 

(mm 


Low-impe. <fte 
(50(1 U\ mtti -t : 


SesntiTity 


Less th«t0 4//V lor 
20 dB qmeling 


lest i* 

70 di quieting 

SSI & CW 25 

HHffifS4l»] 

AM ta/jVlnr l0dSf5^N)rN 


flSjuYlor JO 


Squetctt Sensitivity: 


Less than D 25 //V 


1 25 p* 1 




SiliiliiWl 


More than m dB at 3D fc 
of sdic cent thinrat 


SSB. CW i 4M 2 4 IHjJ-6 di 

4 8 kHr /*« 

FM 6*B. 


204Hi./-Bdfi 
4DkHr/-70Hfi 


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More rtwn .'0 oB 


Bettet th in 70 68 





ACCESSORIES - 



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See fr-our 4ufftor?zetf Kenwood Dea/er for mors del* 




TH-S3QO 

Designed tor use in the 70-cm amateur band, 
'jue design of the TR-8300 makes <! a great 
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transceiver is capable of F3 emission on 23 
i tat -con trot fed channels (three suppfn 
.^sm-rtter output is TO watts. 



^KENWOOD 



fmt*\*ttir fit ftmnttUT rtttittt 

TRIO KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS INC 

•11 WEST WALNUT COMPTON CA 90220 



Looking 




Biff Pasternak WA61TF 
24S54-C Newhalt Av&. 
Newhait CA 91321 

Attention, nostalgia buffs — 
have we got something for you! 
As many of you are aware, 

K6MYK (now WR6ABN) was one 
of the nation's first successful 
amateur repeaters. It has been 
in almost constant day-to-day 
operation since the spring of 
1956. Anyway, in doing research 
for a new FM and repeater book, 
I spent a bit of time with MYK's 
designer/builder/licensee Art 
Gentry W6MEP. During the 
course of one afternoon visit, 
Art hauled out a true piece of 
amateur relay history. 

In the accompanying photo, 
Art is busy dusting the cobwebs 
off the original K6MYK receiver. 
The receiver was designed and 
built by Art in the early 1950s 
and was the first such device 
specifically designed for moun- 
iaintop relay service. It is a 
single conversion affair with a 
cavity front end with an overall 
bandwidth on the order of 40 to 
50 kHz, Not exactly narrow^ 
band, but in those days it was 
years ahead of its time, This 
was an AM receiver, since 
K6MYK was originally an AM 
repeater, 

This receiver remained in ser- 
vice until about 1969, when it 
became obvious that FM was 
going to replace AM as the in" 
on two meters. During its life- 
time, It performed admirably. 
Only an occasional tube had to 
toe replaced. This receiver was 
part of an overall repeater pack- 
age whose survival and growth 
pattern helped pave the way for 
much of what we have today, 

AS'RADIO'SHACK-GOES-SQ- 
GOES-THE ???? DEPARTMENT 

Of the many magazines, 
pamphlets, and flyers that 



come across my desk each 
month, perhaps my favorite is 
the monthly flyer published by 
Radio Shack, No, it's not 
because of the monthly spe- 
cials RS runs. No... the first 
thing I do is look for something 
called the "Flyer Side Chat; 1 
written by Radio Shack Presi- 
dent Louis Kornfeld* 

I've never met the man, but 
after reading about 35 or so of 
his columns, I kind of feel that I 
know him. Through him, I may 
have gained a bit of insight into 
the RS operation itself. TandyJ 
RS is really a company on the 
grow, and Louis Kornfeld is ob- 
viously quite proud of that fact, 
It's not what he writes, but 
rather the obvious positive ap- 
proach with which he writes 
that makes his pride obvious 
even to the occasional reader 
He is also a very straight- 
forward man who likes to speak 
his mind; his "Flyer" editorials 
never beat around the bush. 

1 mention all this because I 
have found Radio Shack to be a 
good indicator of the state of 
the entire hobby electronics in^ 
dustry. They are trend-setters, 
unafraid to take a giant step for- 
ward if a viable market seems 
available. Witness the success 
of their TRS-80 computer and 
many other RS products too 
numerous to mention. The nice 
thing about Louis Kornfeld's 
"Flyer Side Chat" is that it gives 
you ongoing insight. To see 
what I mean, I suggest that you 
visit your local RS and pick up 
their current "Flyer." If you are 
like me, you will probably get 
hooked on Kornfeld's editorial 
comment ... or on a TRS-80 of 
the kind I am saving my pennies 
for these days. 

THE 220 UP NORTH 
DEPARTMENT 

Ward Hill WA6FUH is an old 



friend of mine. I first met Ward 
in 1972, about a month after 
moving to the southland, In fact, 
one of the very first Looking 
West columns announced his 
engagement. Since then, Ward 
and his wife Barbara have relo- 
cated in Gamino r California, 
where Ward operates his own 
dental laboratory, I had not 
heard from Ward for a long time, 
until the other day when our 
"'postal lady" delivered a rather 
interesting note from him that I 
wish to share with you. It con- 
cerns a 220 repeater project that 
Ward and some other local ama- 
teurs are involved in, 

It all started about a year ago 
on 146,52. Ward's house sits at 
about the 3000 1 level, and, need- 
less to say, he does not need 
very much power for good sim- 
plex coverage. One day on ,52, 
Ward talked with a group of 
amateurs in Sacramento who 
were looking for a location for a 
220 repeater. One thing led to 
another, and when WB6UBF/ 
RPT commenced operation, it 
did so from Ward's house 
(where it still resides today). As 
you may have surmised* UBF 
has rather good coverage. It is 
an open machine operating on 
223,10 MHz in and 224,70 MHz 
out, with a 9CMJegree antenna 
pattern which gives excellent 
coverage throughout the Sacra- 
mento, Stockton, and Auburn. 
California areas, it also gives 
some extended coverage to 
places as far away as San Jose, 
Not bad for a home-built system 
that started life as a Clegg 
FM-76 transceiver. 

By the way, an interesting 
method was utilized by this 
group to obtain the desired cov- 
erage and pattern direction. 
Rather than use a J-pole anten* 
na phased for a cardioid pat- 
tern, the UBF antenna system 
consists of four 7-element KLM 
yagis fed from a four-port KLM 
power divider (which in turn is 
connected to a Phelps-Dodge 
220-MHz duplexer). They are 
fanned out at equal intervals to 
produce the desired pattern. 




Art Gentry W6MEP dusts off the original K6MYK receiver. 



Ward reports that results with 
this novel approach have been 
far better than expected. 

Currently, UBF has about 15 
regular user/supporters, but it 
also has the welcome mat out 
for anyone else who wishes to 
drop by the channel pair There 
are plans in the mill for a two- 
meter remote downlink to se- 
lected simplex and repeater 
channels, along with a second 
downlink to six meters for op- 
erating DX openings and six- 
meter path experimentation. 
Other projects on the fire in* 
elude a complete touchtone 
decoder system to activate 
most of the foregoing, along 
with a secondary power source 
which might be solar. Of course, 
all of those plans are dependent 
upon usership growth and fi- 
nancial support. 

Each week, we hear of new 
220 relay activity starting up 
here or there. This is extremely 
important news, In that it helps 
ensure the future of that spec- 
trum. It's no secret that our own 
government is about to try to 
sell out 220 MHz at WARC 79. 
We have covered this in depth in 
recent Looking Wesl columns. 
What is nice to see is that 
others agree with my policy of 
taking the initiative to build 220 
activity to a level which would 
make a 220 maritime takeover a 
very hard task. Remember to- 
day the old 73 slogan, "220— 
Use It Or Lose It!", Is more im- 
portant than ever before. 

This brings us to a recent 
special issue of 220 Notes* En- 
titled n A Special Action Bulle- 
tin," ' 5s contents outline what 
action you and I as individual 
amateurs can take to try to 
persuade our government to do 
an about-face in regard to 220 
MHz at WARC. Also included is 
a suggested form letter to be 
used as a guide in requesting 
that action be taken by the FCC 
to keep 220 to 225 MHz ex- 
clusively amateur- The form let* 
ter was prepared by Barry D. 
Bayer K9CFV of the legal firm of 
D'Ancona, Pflaum, Wyatt, and 
Riskind. It takes the stand of 
supporting the Petition for 
Reconsideration on Docket 
20271 filed by the 220 Spectrum 
Management Association of 
Southern California. The letter 
reads as follows: 

Secretary, 

Federal Communications 
Commission, 
Washington DC 20554 

Re: In Support of the Petition of 
the 220-MHz Spectrum 
Management Association 
of Southern California, for 
Reconsideration of Portion 
of Report and Order Docket 
20271 

/ am a licensed amateur radio 

Continued on page 155 



6 



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-J 




Oil :TOOr,B <ii, r\' 

ioi 

i rfTfrntr tub 

tell Ma hri] 

FREE SPEECH 

Recently, the world has wit- 
nessed the worst nuclear acci- 
dent In the history of the United 
States. On the east coast, and 
especially in central New Jer- 
sey, this incident has made resi- 
dents aware of how vulnerable 
we are to next-door nuclear 
technology- 
Amateur radio is now, as it 
has always been, a prime vehi- 
cle tor the exchange of ideas 
and tor open discussions be- 
tween and among concerned li- 
censed operators. For example: 
Senator Goldwater K7UGA con- 
verses with social studies 
students throughout the coun- 
try, Columbia University W2AEE 
initiated the National Student 
Information Net (40m) during 
the 60s, and so on. 

Since then, however, some- 
thing has been added to ama- 
teur radio. State^oMhe-art 
technology (but not state-of-the- 
art thinking) has produced the 
repeater—that wonderfully-effi- 
cient contraption capable of 
fostering human interaction 
and "communications." 

Amateurs throughout the 
country in the style of "New 
Directions Radio" are dis- 
cussing the issues, learning 
trom each other, and forming 
views which may T in the future, 
preserve not only amateur 
radio, but a large proportion of 
the population as well. 

Repeaters with their asso- 
ciated control operators, in 
many cases, prevent communi- 
cation from taking place. Wit- 
ness: a discussion of events on 
the 147.645/147.045 Asbury Park 
repeater between Bob WA2DEX 
and myself, WB2MIC. The topic 
of discussion was the events 
which took place the previous 
day In Lacey Township during a 
scheduled debate between the 
Jersey Central Power and Light 
Company and the Safe Energy 
Alternative Alliance. One in- 
dividual of the SEA Alliance was 
arrested while questioning a 
plainclothes police officer who 
was recording license plate 
numbers. The legality and pur- 
pose of this officer's actions 
were described and discussed, 
Bob is familiar with such mat- 
ters. 

At this point, some true 
American (protector of free 
speech and Mom's apple pie) 
touchtoned the repeater off the 



4 



} . y & £» 



i •■ r o j i r 









£\ * J" 



you 

tL at she &h&u 



air without identifying the 
transmission — breaking the 
law, in fact! Whether in self- 
preservation or as an expres- 
sion of neo-fascism, this in- 
dividual deliberately violated an 
FCC ruling, and did not possess 
the courage, decency, or in- 
tellectual fortitude to explain or 
admit his actions. The only 
alternative was to complete the 
QSO on the repeater's reverse- 
frequency pair. 

There is no argument or 
debate over the right of a con- 
trol operator to shut down a re- 
peater The concern is that such 
an important issue as nuclear 
power now has individuals who 
consider It a controversial 
topic— one that is taboo. 

Let free speech prevail! Let 
the basic tenets of this nation 
stand, not only throughout the 
country but throughout amateur 
radio as well. After all, ham 
radio is part and parcel of our 
entire framework of freedom. 
Let the open forums happen. 

Finally, It is easy to identify 
the ham neo-Nazis and all they 
represent by simply engaging in 
a friendly open dialogue with 
smatterings of relevance. 
They'll run and hide, only to plot 
behind the curtain of the ex- 
ecutive committee meetings. 
There they feel important, in a 
world and modified hobby that 
is so far intellectually removed 
and unaware that the only con* 
solation is peer friendship and 
closeness. Watch them; ob- 
serve them; identify them; but 
most of atl, feel sorry for them. 
But make certain that your 
views and your right to search 
for a meaningful QSO are not 
repressed! 

Jozef Boniakowski WB2MIC 

Neptune NJ 



THE IARL AND TAPES 

Regarding your conception of 
the IARL, please go for it, as you 
have my support. I am so tired of 
hearing the League 'Mine" at the 
hamfests and in their magazine. 
It seems ludicrous to think that 
people who can sink as much 
money as they do into their hob- 
by can't afford another $10 T or 
more, a year to protect their in- 
terests, and regardless of 
League claims, lobbying is the 
only way to do that. Perhaps 
you're correct about the con- 
tests being the way to establish 
visibility. But, as an avid con- 



tester, 1 feel there are enough 
contests now, and setting up 
more may cause us to lose sup- 
port from those who really 
dislike contests. It may also 
tend to cloud the main purpose 
of the organization. In any 
event, I hope you'll be ready to 
go when the time becomes 
right. 

Perhaps you're tired of hear- 
ing success stories about your 
code tapes, but I'm going to 
relate one, anyway. Two friends 
of mine, one a Technician and 
one with an Advanced ticket, 
were preparing for FCC tests at 
a local hamfest. 1 gave the 
20-wpm tape to my friend with 
the Advanced, and subsequent 
QSO-type tests that I sent him 
on the air confirmed that he 
would have no trouble with the 
test. My Tech friend has been 
away from code for so long that 
it looked like a real challenge. 

I started him off with your 
beginner's tape and then gave 
him the 13-wpm tape. His prog- 
ress seemed somewhat slow, 
and he further seemed to have 
difficulty when I sent him QSO* 
type tests because he would 
tend to read the copy and get 
lost. So I set my sending/spac- 
ing to match your 13-wpm tape 
and made up several QSO-type 
tests with questions for htm, so 
he would have a better idea of 
what to expect at the actual 
test. At the hamfest, I learned 
early that my Advanced friend 
had passed his code test; I 
waited like an expectant father 
to see if my Tech friend had 
passed his 13-wpm test. He 
finally emerged all smiles, as he 
had passed the test— at 20 
wpm! 

While I don't recommend us- 
ing the 13-wpm tapes to prepare 
for the Extra, this should give 
you an idea of the margin of 
safety in the tapes. 

R. Michael Reed KflUP 
Wolbach NE 



SLAMMING 

I got to the point when I had 
to write. I got my Novice ticket 
in December of 1976, my Gen- 
eral in October of 1977, and my 
Advanced in June of 1978. I 
have had a subscription to 73 
and QST since that time and 
think they are both very good 
magazines. I just got tired of 
you putting down the ARRL. 
Anybody who does something 
will make mistakes; maybe 
that's why you don't. 

t have yet to see any other 
magazine cut the others down 
like you do QST. You just can't 
seem to resist a chance to put 
the slam on them. I don't know 
what your personal grudge is 
against them, but I do think it's 
about time you started using 
your editorial for other things 
besides devoting 75% of it to 



knocking the ARRL. 

I have never been able to find 
W2NSD/1 giving code practice 
on the air. As far as the 50-year- 
old code tapes by the ARRL are 
concerned, I learned the code 
in one week from it. You say 
you dislike putting in the com- 
mercial for 73 tapes, but you 
still put It In, didn't you? I am 
going to get the 73 20-wpm tape 
and, if it's as good as you say, I 
should be able to pass the Ex- 
tra code test after the first time 
through, since it took a week 
with that no-good ARRL 50- 
year-old tape. 

In your January issue, you 
say Radio magazine had better 
projects by far than QST Why? 
Because you don't like GST? 

I made a few projects out of 
QST and they worked right the 
first time. So far, \ haven't found 
anything in 73 1 wanted to make. 
So does that make QST by far 
the better magazine? 

Wayne, I think it's time you 
started working with/tor ama- 
teur radio instead of against 
QST all the time. You can start 
by stating in your editorial what 
you and 73 are doing for ama- 
teur radio, just to refresh our 
memories. 

I don't really expect to see 
this printed in 73, but I just 
thought t would let you know my 
feelings. If I were knocking QST, 
I'm sure it would get in print. 

Best regards to you and 
yours f Wayne; 73s for now. 
Gordon Traskos W DSD WO 

Milford Ml 



TRAM DIAMOND 60 

I have been keeping fairly 
close tabs on your articles on 
CB-to-10 conversions, but i 
must have missed one, because 
I haven't seen anything on the 
23-channel Tram Diamond 60 
SSB rig. You have a great mag. 
Keep it up. 

Larry Seymour WB9UFT 
Mahomet IL 

Hang in there, Larry, Your rig wilt 
be coming up,— Jeff DeTray 
WB8BTH t Assistant Publisher. 



OVERVOLTAGE 



Although few hams build 
their own transmitters and re- 
ceivers as in the days of AM, 
there is much home brewing in 
the area of station accessories 
— keyers, computers, test 
equipment, etc. Power supplies 
are popular to build so that the 
2-meter rig can be used at home 
as well as in the car. Power sup- 
ply circuits are so common and 
many hams have a false sense 
of security, particularly with the 
"new 1 ' 34erminal regulators 
with thermal shutdown, current 
limiting, etc. 



12 



Unfortunately, overvoitage 
protection is almost universally 
avoided. For an adjustable 
regulator, it is complex, but for a 
fixed voltage or limited range 
supply, it is quite simple. 

Check the reference books. 
An SCR, resistor, and zener are 
about all you need, and pre- 
packaged circuits are available 
commercially and surplus. A 
dollar or two is pretty Gheap in- 
surance when you consider how 
a blown regulator could do 
many dollars of damage to that 
2-meter rig, computer, or what- 
ever. 

Personally, deleting overvoit- 
age protection for solid-state 
circuits is a crime which I hope 
never to commit. But check the 
articles; there are a lot of power 
supply circuits waiting to prove 
the point. 

E. P. Rolek K9SQG/8 
Dayton OH 



COME ON UP 



] 



Come on up— the air is nice 
and clean. Don't let all the ar- 
ticles published about 220 MHz 
scare you, My friends and I here 
on Long Island have enjoyed 
this band for quite awhile; we 
need support now. So, if you 
have a 220 rig T please use it. 

Ed Beinlich WB2IBQ 
Whitestone NY 



INFLATION 



Don't let this inflate your ego, 
but it must be said that your 
magazine gets better with each 
issue. 

I got quite a kick out of the re- 
cent letter you printed from (my 
friend) Merrill Eidson of Temple 
TX. (He's one of my crystal sup- 
pliers for those V^-inch thick AT- 
cut blanks and crystals for 
radiobeacon equipment at 
Alaskan airports. He's the fast 
one on the continent who 
makes up these very important 
crystal units in the old FP164 
3-inch round white ceramic 
holders with two nickeled studs 
protruding.) But I agree with you 
as being right on in criticizing 
the Aft RL 

R W, Anderson W7AR 
Seattle WA 



MORE ON TAPES 



Around the middle of Janu- 
ary, I received your 20- and 
25-wpm code tapes, At the time 
I received them, you expressed 
an interest in the amount of 
time I spent gomg from the 
General class speed to the Ex- 
tra class speed. 

The total time I spent was 
seventy-one hours. I am able to 
copy the 25-wpm tape now with 



an error rate of about 3%, The 
difficulty of the groupings and 
the added 5-wpm speed was 
ust what I needed to push me 
nto the 20*wpm plain text re- 
quired by the FCC, 

Without the skill I acquired 
from the tapes, I'm sure I could 
not have passed the code test. I 
think they are excellent, and I 
would certainly recommend 
them to anyone wishing to up- 
grade. 

Larry L. Sias NflASV 

Kansas City MO 



BACKSTABBING 

Recently, a friend loaned me 
an October, 1978, copy of 73 
(the first that I have read In 
years) to review Info contained 
In the article, "Mighty Mods for 
the 820S." I was very interested 
in your editorial on "a woman 
ARRL director," I have been fol- 
lowing the action on Mary Lewis 
vs. the ARRL, Thurston, et al, 
and, while not having alt the 
details, I always felt there was 
backstabbing, etc. As you prob- 
ably know, HQ has received two 
petitions from Northwestern 
Division members. One re- 
quests that ballots be released 
for election of Director, and the 
other asks that Vice Director 
Mayer K7BT be appointed in- 
terim Director until the election 
takes place. You will note from 
minutes of the January 24-25, 
1979, Board of Directors meet* 
ing (March, 1979, QST) t Vice 
Director Mayer apparently was 
not allowed by Thurston to at- 
tend (out of Division funds), 
although 10 other Division Vice 
Directors did! With regard to the 
last paragraph of that portion of 
your editorial, I absolutely 
agree. 

Walter R, Joos W6EKM 
Vacaville CA 



GALLED 



BIG PROJECT 



With your reputation for ad- 
vancing the amateur radio field, 
I would like to suggest a booklet 
that would be of great use to the 
beginner in this field. Namely, 
an evaluation of amateur equip* 
ment for the past fifteen or 
twenty years, which would in- 
clude the good and bad points 
of each t the original cost, possi- 
ble current value, and some 
judgment of the equipment. 

If you and your associates 
could work this out, it could be 
of value for the beginner in buy- 
ing his first or successive sets. 
Don Hurley VE3H AN 
Brighton, Ontario 

That's an awfully big project, 
Don. Does anyone want to take 
on this project? — Jeff DeTray 
WB8BTH, Assistant Publisher. 



I am a new Novice, I have 
bought $50 worth of books 
which 1 study at least 6 hours a 
week. I subscribe to both 73 and 
QST. I am going to get that 
General. I am building a 40- 
meter QRP rig designed by a 
local ham, but I do have a prob- 
lem which you seem to be un- 
aware of. 

73, QST f and all the manufac- 
turers do not realize that the 
typical new Novice has limita- 
tions as to what he can do. I 
would like very much to buitd 
the Mini-Miser receiver in the 
Handbook. The assembly of 
parts on boards offers no prob- 
lem, but I cannot manufacture 
PC boards, the shielding, and 
the cabinet. Therefore, it won't 
be built and we both lose. 

Another thing that galls me is 
the way your publication lacks 
simple and thorough articles for 
the Novice. Maybe when 1 get 
my General, I will be equally ar- 
rogant. I hope not, 

Nate Bushnell KACDGN 
Littleton CO 



SMALL PROBLEM 



J 



I read your March, 1979, arti- 
cle on the universal alarm cir- 
cuit. It came out just at the right 
time. With high water levels dur- 
ing the spring thaw, water seep- 
age into the basement started 
to become a problem. If I had 
this early warning system built, 
I could rectify the situation 
before it caused any damage. 

I went down to the local parts 
emporium and picked up a HEP 
C4001P McMOS chip. It states 
on the package: ll Pin-for-pin 
replacement for CD4O01A," 
which is what the project called 
for. There was only one thing 
overlooked and that is the type 
of gate HEP thinks a CD4001A 
is. Their chip is a quad 2-input 
NAND gate which, of course, is 
not correct for the alarm. If you 
have to use the HEP line, get 
theif C40O0P which is a quad 
2-input NOR gate, even though 
HEP thinks that it is a "pin* 
for-pin replacement for a 
CD4000A/' 

Now that this small problem 
Is out of the way, the alarm is 
complete and works great. 

Dave Faucher WA1UQC 
Collinsville CT 



THANKS 



] 



Recently, I was successful In 
obtaining my Extra class li- 
cense. Many thanks are due to 
the editors of 73 Magazine who 
put together that TAB book, 
Amateur Radio Extra-Glass 
License Study Guide f which I 



used as the basis for my self- 
conducted study program in 
amateur radio theory and prac- 
tice over the past several years, 

I found the topics introduced 
there to be an excellent starting 
point for study of the extensive 
literature surrounding amateur 
radio. I undertook this as a 
surprisingly-enjoyable pastime 
whenever I found the time to 
continue with it. As a result, I 
have been able to reach the 
point where I am confident that I 
can be of considerable assis- 
tance to the ham fraternity and 
the public which we serve. 

Thanks are also in order for 
the 73 Magazine code tapes 
which I found helpful in brush- 
ing up on the 20-wpm code 
speed needed for the Extra 
class license exam. 

Thomas C Kipps KA6Z 

Fresno CA 



QRP ZONE 

We're in the process of taking 
the advice of K5UKH JCB to 10 
—part XV, November. 1978) and 
converting a currently-discount- 
ed (S34.38 each) Realistic 
walkie-talkie, Model TRC-201, to 
ten meters. This unit is identical 
to the TRO180 which Tom Mur- 
phy K5UKH modified. The re- 
ceiver in this unit is unusually 
hot. 

International Crystal has the 
correlation for providing us the 
pair for 29,000 MHz. Another 
unit, the 5-Watt TRC-208 with 6 
channels, is tempting as it 
would provide a tight band of 6 
channels from 29.000 through 
29.050 MHz for QRP operation. 
A 12-volt power cord plugged In- 
to the car lighter liberates you 
from dying carbon batteries or 
flagging nicads, 

This is the time, Wayne, to 
stimulate hams into honoring 
and using a QRP zone, because 
there are already such large 
areas on ten for other modes of 
transmission other than AM. 

I would welcome correspon- 
dence from interested hams. 
Service bulletins ($2 each) are 
available through Radio Shack 
stores. 

F. W. Anderson W7AR 

8041 31st Ave. N.W\ 

Seattle W A 98107 



ICOM EAST 



] 



When a company that adver- 
tises in your magazine performs 
a service which is far beyond 
the expected, with courtesy and 
a sense of dedication, I felt that 
you would like to know about it. 

First, let me assure you that I 
have been so delighted with the 
products and service of loom 
East, Inc., that I have added 

Continued on page 153 



13 



/Microcomputer 
Interfacing 



Jonathan A. Titus 
Christopher A. Titus 
David G. Larsen 
Peter ft. Rony 

PREPARING YOUR 
PROGRAMS 

One of the problems facing 
many microcomputer users is 
the preparation of software for 
their particular applications. 
The software examples which 
we have provided in past col- 
umns are short enough to have 
been put together or assembled 
by hand, i.e. f we translated each 
mnemonic into its octal, hexa- 
decimal, or binary equivalent. 
Addresses for jumps, calls, and 
input/output devices are easily 
added or changed since the 
computer programs are short 
and the addresses are probably 
listed in sequential order on the 
rough draft. Unfortunately, not 
all software preparation is this 
easy. Many application pro- 
grams can be many thousands 
of steps long. This column will 
initiate a discussion of the aids 
available for microcomputer 
program development. 

One of the biggest problems 
in software development is the 
clear, concise statement of the 
problem and how U is to be 
solved, Alt of the desired re- 
sults, inputs, outputs, and the 
complete program flow, includ- 
ing all decision-making steps, 
must be considered before the 
programming is started. This 
can be in outline or block 
diagram form, but a flowchart 
will prove to be much easier to 
follow. A typical flowchart is 
shown in Fig. 1. 

After the problem has been 
well thought out and a solution 
put in flowchart form, a deci- 
sion must be made. Is the pro- 
gram short enough to be easily 
translated by hand? In many 
cases, particularly where the 
programs are simple, hand 
assembly makes sense. In other 
cases, sottware development 
aids called editors and 





I NPUT 

DATA 




HQ^ 


HS IT AU* 



"E" 7 



YES 




Fig, 1, Typicat flowchart. 



assemblers are faster and more 
efficient. To understand how 
editors and assemblers work, 
let's consider the process used 
to put together this column. 

The first step is an outline of 
the subject so that we can cover 
it well in the short column for- 
mat. A handwritten copy is then 
typed, corrected, retyped, and 
perhaps corrected and typed a 
final time. The illustrations and 
examples are formulated and 
drawn separately. This is the 
editing process. When writing a 
column, it is best to avoid 
references such as, "the exam- 
ple below" or "the table on the 
following page." When the col- 
umn is composed or assem- 
bled, references to Table 1 or 
Fig. 4 are much easier to follow. 

Computer software is devel^ 
oped in much the same way. An 
editor program is used, either 
on a microcomputer or a time- 
sharing system, to edit the in- 
dividual program steps. The edi- 
tor program can correct pro- 
gram steps, change steps, and 
insert and delete steps just as 
an actual editor can do with a 
manuscript. The editor program 
is generally unaware that you 
are writing a computer program, 
since you can use most editors 
to write a letter, prepare mailing 
lists, etc. When using an editor 
to prepare a program in mne- 
monic form, symbolic address- 
es are often assigned to soft- 
ware tasks within the program. 
In this way, the actual value of 
the addresses for subprograms 
or subroutines is not needed. 
Just as we can refer you to Fig. 
4, the program may similarly 
refer to the letters, LOOP, as the 
starting address of a time-delay 
loop. Allowing us to use sym- 
bolic addresses for program 
steps means that the program 
may be changed without regard 
to the actual numeric values of 
addresses. 

The assembler program must 
be such that it accepts informa- 
tion from the editor and gen- 
erates an output in a form com- 
patible with your computer. 
Just as you assemble short pro- 
grams a step at a time, so does 
the assembler. The assembler 
contains a table of mnemonics 
and their equivalent values. For 
example, an 8080 assembler 
would translate an MViA in- 
struction into 076 octal. The 
assembler also assigns real 
16-bit addresses to your sym- 
bolic addresses, such as LOOP. 
When using symbolic address- 
es, you must be sure to have a 
program step for each symbolic 
address, and you must assign 



Editor: 



Assembler: 



Monitor: 



GLOSSARY 
A program that allows edit functions such as addi- 
tion of a line or character to a program, insertion, 
deletion, etc t It permits you to alter your program. 
The input data could be anything from programs or 
reports to raw Instrument data. 
The program that converts the assembly language 
code into machine code, accepting mnemonics and 
symbolic addresses instead of actual binary values 
for addresses, instructions, and data. 
A program which controls the opera! ion of the 
various programs available. The monitor wlil be 
able to access the editor, assembler, or other pro- 
grams. 

A program which allows the user to observe the pro- 
gram flow and the results of the program's opera^ 
tlon in a step-by-slep mode, A debugger may be 
used to change data or instructions, alter registers, 
etc. 

A special instruction which may be inserted in a 
program to break off the normal program control 
and return control to a debug-type program. When a 
breakpoint is executed, the debug program will irv 
dicate what the computer was doing at that point. 
Cross Assembler: An assembler program which will generate the 

binary code of a program for a computer other than 
the type it is being used with, For example, an 8080 
cross-assembler might operate on a PDP-S mini- 
computer. 



Debugger: 



Breakpoint: 



an address if you use a symbol. 
You cannot assign the same 
"name" to more than one ad- 
dress. Most assemblers will 
recognize a redefined symbol or 
an undefined symbol and will 
produce an error message to let 
you know what needs to be cor- 
rected. 

The final assembler output 
will be in punched paper tape, 
cassette, or disk form ready to 
run on your system. Most as- 
semblers will also produce a 
listing of the program showing 
the address of each step, the 
data in each successive loca- 
tion, a symbolic address name, 
and the mnemonic, plus any 
comments. A typical assembler 
output is shown in Table 1* 

After a program has been 
assembled, it will probably have 
to be debugged to get it to 
operate properly. The program 
checkout and debugging can be 
painful without additional soft- 
ware "tools." Computer control 
panels often prove useful, but 
reading binary codes can be- 
come tedious, and there are 
many computers without exter- 
nal controls and readouts, As 
an alternative, there are debug- 
ging programs available for 
most microcomputers which al- 
low you to charge instructions, 
list blocks of data or instruc- 



tions, and single-step through a 
program one instruction at a 
time. 

One feature of many debug 
programs is the ability to 
establish a breakpoint in the 
software being tested. When 
the computer reaches a break- 
point, the instruction at that ad- 
dress is executed and an output 
device, such as a teletypewriter, 
lists the contents of important, 
internal CPU registers. Break- 
points are very useful since they 
indicate not only that the com- 
puter reached a certain point in 
the software, but also what the 
computer was doing when it got 
there. If a breakpoint is set in 
the normal program flow and 
is not reached, there is some- 
thing wrong with the program. 
In this case, the breakpoint 
would be moved closer and 
closer to the start of the pro- 
gram until the error is found. 
When the error is found, it may 
be corrected by using the debug 
program to change an instruc- 
tion, data, etc. 

Once the program is operat- 
ing correctly, the debug pro- 
gram should have the means of 
saving it on paper tape, a 
cassette, or another medium. It 
should also be able to read such 

Continued on page 154 



003 


000 


061 


5TAftT# 


LXISP 


003 


001 


377t 




377 


003 


DOS 


000 




000 


003 


003 


333 


LOOP* 


m 


003 


04 


05 




005 


003 


005 


37 6 




CPI 


03 


006 


0S6 




026 


003 


0? 


312 




JZ 


003 


010 


015 




DETECT 


003 


on 


003 







003 


012 


303 




JttP 


003 


013 


003 




LOOP 


003 


014 


003 







003 


015 


171 


DETECT* 


HO VAC 


003 


016 


323 




OUT 


003 


017 


007ff 




007 


003 


020 


(66 




KLT 



•003 000 

/SYMBOLIC ADDRESS OF START 



/INPUT DATA FROM PORT 5 

/COMPARE IT TO 0£6 

/IF IT MATCHES GO TO "DETECT' 



/IF IT DOESN'T MATCH* GO TO 
/LOOP AMD CHECK AGAIN 



Table 1. Software example showing a typical assembler output. 



14 



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15 





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1 



Contests 



Robert Baker WB2GFE 
15 Windsor Dr. 
Atco NJ 08004 

MINNESOTA QSO PARTY 
Starts: 1800 GMT June 2 
Ends: 2359 GMT June 3 

This year's contest is spon- 
sored by the Heartland Amateur 
Radio Club. There are no mode 
or time restrictions, but only 
one transmitter is allowed in 
operation at any one time; no 
orossband contacts are al- 
lowed. Novices compete with 
other Novices, Technicians with 
other Technicians. Novices and 
Technicians must identify their 
license class when sending 
their call as 'VN'" or u tT\ Phone 
and CW are considered to be 
the same contest; please score 
as such. Net QSOs are not valid. 
EXCHANGE: 

RS(T) and MN county or ARRL 
section/country, 
SCORING: 

MN stations multiply total of 
points by the number of sec- 
tions plus DX countries (W/VE 
excluded). Others multiply QSO 
points by the number of MN 
counties worked (87 maximum). 
Score one point per phone QSO 
and 2 points per CW QSO. 
Novices/Technicians count 5 
points per QSO, Contacts with 
HARC station WBQTTZ count 10 
points per QSO on each band. 
SUGGESTED FREQUENCIES: 

CW— 28150, 28050, 21050, 
21150, 14075, 7075, 7125, 3725, 



3600. 

Phone— 28700, 21400, 14300, 
7275, 3950, WB0TT2 will also be 
operating RTTY on each band. 
ENTRIES & AWARDS; 

include a check sheet for 
each band/mode used if you 
make 50 or more contacts. Logs 
must include date/time (GMT) t 
bands, modes, and exchanges. 
Usual disqualification criteria 
and classes of awards, plus 
county awards to MN stations 
with 10 or more QSOs. Logs 
must be postmarked no later 
than July 1st; include an SASE 
for return of awards and contest 
summary. Send to HARC T do 
Scott Nelson WD0EFZ, 421 W, 
Wisconsin Ave., Staples MN 
56479. 



SOWP 4th ANNUAL CW QSO 
PARTY 

The SOWP 4th Annual CW 
QSO Party is sponsored by the 
Society of Wireless Pioneers 
(SOWP) and will be held from 
OOOOZ on June 6 through 2359Z 
on June 7. There are no formal 
requirements except an ex- 
change of name, membership 
number, and QTH, Suggested 
frequencies are 55 kHz (±5 
kHz) up from the low end of 
each amateur band. Novices 
will operate in the center of 
each Novice band. Members 
who can only participate part* 
time are requested to make 
their calls on the even hours 



Calendar 



June 2*3 


June 6-7 


June 9 


June 9-10 


June 10 


June 16-17 


June 23-24 


June 30- July 1 


July 4 


July 14-15 


July 28-30 


Aug 4 


Aug 4-5 


Aug 25-26 


SeptS 


Sept 8-9 


Sept 9 


Sept 15 16 


Sept 2223 


Oct 13-14 


Oct 20-21 


Nov 3-4 


Nov 10-11 


Nov 1MB 


Nov 24 


Nov 25 


Dec 1-2 


Dec 8 9 



Minnesota QSO Party 

SOWP CW QSO Party 

DAFG Short Contest— SW 

ARRL VHP QSO Party 

DAFG Short Contest— VHF 

All Asian DX Contest— Phone 

West Virginia QSO Party 

ARRL Field Day 

Seven-Land QSO Party 

ARRL Straight Key Night 

ARRL IARU Radiosport Competition 

Colombian Independence Day Contest 

CW County Hunters Contest 

DAFG 10 Meter Contest 

ARRL UHF Contest 

All Asian DX Contest-CW 

DAFG Short Contest— VHF 

ARRL VHF QSO Party 

DAFG Short Contest— SW 

Scandinavian Activity— CW 

Scandinavian Activity — Phone 

ARRL CD Party— CW 

ARRL CD Party— Phone 

ARRL Sweepstakes— CW 

CQ-WE Contest 

ARRL Sweepstakes— Phone 

DAFG Short Contest— SW 

DAFG Short Contest— VHF 

ARRL 160 Meter Contest 

ARRL 10 Meter Contest 



during the period. To optimize 
long-distance contacts, it is 
suggested that ten and fifteen 
meters be used from 1400 to 
2100 hours 2. The cail will be 
CO SOWP, A special certificate 
will be available to all members 
who contact a minimum of ten 
other members during the peri- 
od. Requests for the certificate 
must include a list of stations 
contacted, dates, times, and 
membership numbers. In addi- 
tion, an SASE must be includ* 
ed. Certificates will be Issued 
by the V + P, for Awards, Manuel 
"Pete" Fernandez W4SM S 129 
Hialeah Road, Greenville, 
South Carolina 29607. Re- 
quests must be submitted not 
later than 30 June 1979, 

DAFG SHORT CONTESTS 

FOR 1979 

SW (80 and 40 meters): 

Saturday, June 9, 1300 to 

1600 GMT 
Sunday, September 9, 0600 to 

1100 GMT 
Saturday, November 24, 1300 to 

1600 GMT 

VHF (2m and 70cm); 

Sunday, June 10, 0700 to 

1100 GMT 
Saturday, September 8, 1200 to 

1600 GMT 
Sunday, November 25. 0700 to 

1100 GMT 
The DAFG sponsors this 
year's short contests and wel- 
comes participation of all RTTY 
amateurs both inside and out- 
side of Germany. There will be 
an SW and a VHF contest, both 
contests being scored sepa- 
rately. The contest is split into 
5 single contests within the 
year. After closing the 5th 
single contest, the winner of 
the year in each classification 
will be announced. Note: The 
official rules were received too 
late to list the dates for the first 
two weekends in January and 
March. 

General call is *CQ DAFG 
CONTEST/' On SW {80 and 40 
meters) after each QSQ t the sta- 
tion having called last Keeps the 
frequency. The previous holder 
should QSY. This rule is not 
valid for the VH F part ! Each sta* 
tion may be worked once per 
band, Contacts via repeaters 
are not valid. Classifications in- 
clude: SW— Class A: SW sta- 
tions above 200 Watts input; 
Class B: SW stations up to 200 
Watts input; Class C; SWL sta- 
tions. VHF— Class D: VHF sta- 
tions. 
EXCHANGE: 

RST, QSO number starting 
with 001 T name, and QTH. 
SCORING: 

SW— Each completed QSO 
counts 1 point on 80 and 40 
meters. 

VHF— Each completed QSO 
counts 1 point per each 10 km 
distance on 2 meters and 3 
points per 10 km on 70 cm. 
Each different prefix per each 



band will be counted as a multi- 
plier. Final score is QSO points 
multiplied by the total of muiti* 
pliers. 
ENTRIES: 

Logs must contain call, 
name, and complete address of 
participant in block letters, 
classification, time (GMT), call, 
QTH of partner station, RST and 
QSO number sent/received, 
band used T and number of 
prefixes worked. Show final 
score; logs without final score 
will count as checklogs. For 
SWLs, scoring is the same as 
above; the same station may be 
reported a maximum of 5 times. 
Instead of message received in- 
fo, the SWL should report call of 
partner station (worked). The re- 
sults will be published in the 
news bulletins of the DAFG, In 
flTTY Magazine, in the DARC 
magazine, and in foreign courte- 
sy publ ications* Your log should 
be in the hands of the contest 
manager not later than 20 days 
after closing each single con- 
test. Each later incoming log 
will count as a checklog only. 
All decisions are final. Send en- 
tries to: Klaus K. Zielski DF7FB t 
PO Box 1 147, D-6455 Erlensee 1, 
West Germany. 

All non-DL participants will 
receive the results of each part 
of the contest by regular mail. 
An award will be given every 
participant at the end of the 
year. Special plaque for the top 
scorers in each classification 
stated in the annual results* 

ALL ASIAN DX CONTEST 
Phone; 1000 GMT June 16 to 

1600 GMT June 17 
CW: 1000 GMT August 25 to 

1600 GMT August 26 
The purpose of this contest 
sponsored by the JARL is to in- 
crease the activity of radio ama- 
teurs in Asia and to establish as 
many contacts as possible dur- 
ing the contest periods between 
Asian and non-Asian stations. 
All amateur bands below 30 
MHz may be used. Entry classi- 
fications include: single 
operator, 1.9 MHz band, CW on- 
ly; single operator, 3.5 MHz 
band; single operator, 7 MHz 
band; single operator, 14 MHz 
band; single operator, 21 MHz 
band; single operator, 28 MHz 
band; single operator, multi- 
band; muUi'Operator, multi- 
band. 

Power; types of emission, 
and frequencies used must be 
within the limits of your own 
station license. General call for 
Asian stations is "CQ TEST. 
non-Asians use "CQ ASIA." No 
crossband contacts are al- 
lowed. For participants in 
single-operator classes, never 
transmit two signals or more at 
the same time. For multi-opera- 
tor participants, never transmit 
two or more signals on each 

Continued on page 154 



18 



Faces, Places 




The Heart of America Radio Club W&RR (Kansas City MO) provided 
communications at the 1979 Leukemia Telethon. Among the 35 
ham participants were Camitie Norton WBQY&A, John Bauerty 
WBQNKR, and Stephen Lufcy WB&LFY. 




Last November, LIMARC (Long island Mobile Amateur Radio Club) 
members erected three new ATV repeater antennas at their new 
Syosset, New York, site. The installation crew included (left to right) 
WB2KCD, WN2VVR, W2MVS, W2KPQ, KA2CLQ, W2TRP, WA2SHC. 
WB2WAK t N2FP, K2LtO t and WB2SDG. (Photo by K2JKX) 





George Romanisky WA6WXD, Los Angeles County Sheriff, was on 
duty at the Pasadena Rose Parade on New Year f s Day. At the time 
the picture shown was being televised on national TV t he was in 
QSO through the WRBABW repeater landfine linkup with repeaters 
WR7AKI, WR8ACC t and WR4ABR. 




A few of the hams who pulled emergency duty at the Grumman Cor- 
poration's amateur radio station during the Iranian crisis were 
(front row, left to right) Dick Townes t Skip Courtney; (back row)Zac 
Zitavy, Ray SchubneK Jim Kearney, and Jack Cornell. (Photo by 
Rich Breunig) 




(Left) This solar thermal steam electric generator array is under 
construction at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Pasadena, Califor- 
nia, parking lot A dedicated group of young peopie has been 
donating its efforts over the past eight years to build this device 
for the people of Pitcaim Island. When completed, the array wilt 
deliver 5-8 kW in good sun t hopefully allowing the islanders to 
stretch their increasingly costly supply of dieset fuel a tittle fur- 
ther. (Above) At the J PL club station W6VIQ, Dick Piety K6SVP(left) 
made contact with Tom Christian VR2TC on Pitcaim. Present in 
the shack at the time was a group concerned with how to get a very 
large and heavy structure from the sea in Bounty Bay up a sheer 
cliff on Pitcaim onto the surface of the island. The group included 
the New Zealand Consul General for Los Angeles, Frank Mutter 
(right). The consensus was that only a Chinook-type military 
helicopter would be able to accomplish the task, Any offers? 
(Photos by Or Norman L Chatfin K6PGX) 



19 



RTTY Loop 



Marc i. Leavey, M.D. WA3AJR 
4006 WinJee Road 
fyndaifstown MD 21 133 

This month we begin the third 
year of RTTY Loop, What bet- 
ter way to celebrate a birthday 
than to Investigate once more 
the hottest topic around today: 
microprocessors in RTTY. A 



year ago we looked at reception 
techniques; this month and 
next will cover transmitting. 

While RTTY transmission can 
quickly get complicated with 
various buffers and special 
function generators, our first ef- 
forts shall be directed at merely 
producing a program that takes 
keyboard input and converts it 






3 




to standard RTTY output. We 
will hold other considerations 
for later and deal here with the 
code conversion, speed conver- 
sion, and interfacing. 

Much as we did for RTTY 
reception, let's enumerate our 
goals in RTTY transmission: (1) 
input a character in ASCII from 
the keyboard; (2) convert that 
character to the Baudot equiva- 
lent; (3) maintain LTRS-FiGS 
shift appropriately; (4) put the 
character out at 45.45 baud (60 
wpm). 

There are also a tew niceties 
we may like, such as downshift* 
on-space or automatic carriage 
return/line feed. We will try to in- 
corporate these as the need ap- 
pears. 

The first step, inputting the 
character as ASCII from the key- 
board, is straightforward. Es- 
sentially, all computers have an 
inputting routine, such as the 
MIKBUG™ INEEE routine, to 
accomplish this, The only re- 
quirement is that the routine 
mask off the MSB of the input. 
The ASCII that we use is a 
seven-bit code, and the eighth 
bit will confuse things. 

Before we get too deeply into 
this in wordsjet's walk through 
the first flowchart, shown in Fig, 
1. The keyboard input places an 
ASCII character into the ac- 
cumulator. Values greater than 
$5F are tested for. These repre- 



MSB : 1 - LTRS = FIGS 



1/0 
1/0 
1/0 
1/0 
1/0 




BAUDOT CODE 



LSB: 



Fig. 2. BAUDOT encoding. 

sent lowercase and, if present, 
would cause the table read to 
search out of the table, ff the 
ASCII code is greater than $5F, 
it is converted to its uppercase 
equivalent by subtracting $20. 
This value is then used as an 
offset for an indexed search 
which loads the corresponding 
table value back into the accu- 
mulator. This Baudot-keyed 
value is either $00, $FF, $FE, or 
a representation of the Baudot 
character, If the latter, the for- 
mat is as shown in Fig. 2. 

While the conversion from 
ASCII to Baudot may at first 
glance seem to be rather for- 
midable, it really involves the 
same kind of look-up table as 
the Baudot-to-ASCU transfor- 
mation in the receiving program 
did. By encoding several loca- 

Continued on page 156 



< BAUDOT »i CHtoV 
ACCUMULATOR \ 
minus case ar/ 



Fig. h Main program loop. 



8AUDQT CHAfl 

IN 
ACCUMULATOR 



SHIFT LEFT 




STORE 
■GCUMULAl " 



OUTPUT 
"FIGURES* 



PUUu 

ACCUMULATOR! 



CLEAR 
SHIFT 



LETTERS* 



PULL 
ACCUM0LATOR 



INCREMENT 
SHIFT 



OUTPUT 

THE 

CHARACTER 



LOAD 

COUNTER 
WITH 3 



OUTPUT 
SMCt 




DEC COUNTER 




SEND 

3lrrrSEC 
STOP 



(flETURNjI 



Fig. 3. Shift storage. 



Fig. 4. BAUDOT output 



20 







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DX 



Chuck Stuart N5KC 
51 15 Mens fee Drive 
Dallas TX 75227 

Summer is here— the sum- 
mer ot the greatest DX condi- 
tions since 1957. Those of you 
who have been around long 
enough to have seen a com- 
plete sunspot cycle know that it 
has not always been like this 
nor will it be like this forever, 
Perpetual sunspots exist only In 
DX Heaven, To you newcomers , 
we can only advise that you take 
advantage of your good timing 
and work everything possible 
while you can. In years hence at 
future club meetings, the newer 
generations will hasten to 
gather at your feet and listen to 
unbelievable stories of cycle 21 . 

DX PROFILE 

This month we profile not a 
who but a what, the Northern 
California DX Foundation, if you 
are not a member, you are miss- 
ing out. Drop a note to Box 71 7, 
Oakland CA 94604, for complete 
information on how you can be^ 
come one of the deserving 
ones. 

The NCDXF was started In 
1972 by K6KQN. Its purpose . . . 
to assist radio and scientific 
events with funds or equipment. 
It would be supported by dona- 
tions from those who benefit. It 
would provide a central point 
where funds could be collected 
and dispersed . . . after applica- 
tions for assistance were care- 
fully screened by the Board of 
Trustees. 

The Board of Trustees would 
be a panel of responsible per- 
sons, prominent in the elec- 
tronics industry or business 
world, having amateur radio 
(especially DX) for a hobby. 
They would give their services 
and counsel to the NCDXF at no 
salary or compensation in any 



form. That was the goal. 

If you have worked every- 
thing, then all the Foundation 
can offer is the satisfaction of 
helping others. If the hobby has 
given you pleasure, put some- 
thing back to help someone 
else. The list below has received 
aid from the NCDXF and must 
have given some of you a new 
country. Were any of them new 
for you? 

1974: ARRL Foundation, 
VR3AG = Fanning, KP6KR = 
Kingman, OH2BH/QJ0 = 
Market, XU1AA = Khmer, 
KP6PA = Palmyra, W6WX/KJ6 
= Johnston, and OSCAR/ 
AMSAT Project. 

1975; CR9AK = Macao, 
3B8DA = Mauritius, JY8BH = 
Jordan, CT9AT = Madeira, 
C5AZ m Gambia, KC4NI = 
Navassa, OHQAM and OH0DX 
= Aland, SV1GA = Mt. Athos, 
HB0B2D = Liechtenstein, 

1976: A35NN = Tonga, 
9N1MM/7 = Nepal, ST2SA = 
Sudan, ST2SA/ST0 = So. 
Sudan, 2K2AQ = Niue, HK0AA 
= Serrana Bank, TA7ABK = 
Turkey, YM0AA = Geyser, 
VK9XX = Christmas Island, 
HK0AA = Bajo Nuevo, Moon- 
bounce Expeditions— HK1TL 
= Colombia, So. America, 
K6YNB/KL7 = Alaska, N6NB = 
VHP states VT, Rl, DE T WV f UT, 
NV. And we provided an SWL re- 
ceiver to a boy with a terminal 
illness 

1977: KP6BD = Kingman, 
The Personal Foundation, 
3B8DT = Mauritius, SU1IM a 
Egypt, KP6AL = Palmyra, 
VP80N = Fa!klands,4UiUN = 
United Nations Amateur Radio 
Station. 

1978: PY0RO = St Peter/ 
Paul, ZL1BKUK = Kermadec, 
K5YY/FH8 = Mayotte, D68AF 
= Comoros, FH8CY 
Mayotte, YI1BGD ss lraq,ZS3 ~ 
Waivis Bay t VK9YS = Cocos* 




Last month we showed you the SSB operating position at KV4AA. 
Above is the CW positron from where most of the almost 
unbelievable 48,100 QSOs were made during 1978. 



Keeiing. STOYY = So. Sudan, 
W0RJU/KP1 = Navassa, K5YY/ 
ST2 = Sudan, FO0XA = Clip- 
perton, CE0AE = Easter Island, 
LA1VC = Bouvet, ARRL IARU 
"Project Goodwill." 

Application for assistance 
must come from the person or 
group directly involved. It takes 
too much time to deal with 2nd 
and 3rd party requests. And 
they must be processed 
through PO Box 717, Oakland 
CA 94604, not via a trustee, 

Application processing time: 
The NCDXF has nine trustees 
that must vote on the requests. 
They seldom have meetings, so 
voting is done by telephone. 
Don K6RV, the president, calls 
each trustee long-distance (at 
his own personal expense) to 
poll the votes on various items. 
Allow plenty of time for pro- 
cessing. 

Equipment donations are en- 
couraged, but must be trouble- 
free, it is asking too much to ex- 
pect the Foundation to find a 
repairman, You are the one that 
gets the tax receipt. 

Membership; Anyone is invit- 
ed to become a member. A mini- 
mum donation of $5 is required 
to cover membership certifi- 
cate, etc. There are no yearly 
dues or demands, but the Foun- 
dation must have an influx of 
capital if it is to continue, so 
they encourage a yearly con- 
tribution. For USA tax purposes, 
they are classed as a private 
operating founaation, defined 
in Code Sect, 4942(1X3), which 
allows up to 50% of your ad 
justed gross income to become 
a deductible contribution. If you 
are in a position to make a 
substantial donation, write for 
details. 

HEARD ON THE BAND 
The Desecheo operation, 
KP4AM/D, was a roaring suc- 
cess with over 21 ,000 contacts 
made on all bands 2 through 
160. The QSLs were expected to 
hit the mails in early May, so 
you should have yours In hand 
by this time. Although the 
operation received financial 
support from the Northern 
California DX Foundation, it is 
still several thousand dollars in 
the red, Those wishing to help 
out can direct their mail to the 
DX Ctub of Puerto Rico, PO Box 
50073, Levittown PR 00950. 
Those taking part in the opera- 
tion were KP4AM, KP4Q, N4EA, 
KP4DSD, KV4KV, and N4ZC, 

EA6CE was a multi-operator 
effort in the recent ARRL DX 
Contest. They managed some 
3,000 contacts in a forty-eight 
hour period and ended with bet* 
ter than 1.5 million points. QSLs 
should be directed to PO Box 
31, Palma de Mallorca, Balearic 
Islands, Spain. 

While we are reporting from 
Spain, we might mention that 
Fernando EASCR sends word 
that permission has been 



granted for 160 activity from 
Spain. This includes the EA6/8/9 
types as well, and, while there 
may be some restrictions in 
some areas, you should soon be 
hearing all the EAs on 160. 

George Collins VE3FXT was 
mobiting around the US last 
summer and dropped In on the 
Fresno International DX meet- 
ing. George is planning Quite a 
bit of DX activity in the coming 
years, including a massive ef- 
fort preceding the 1984 Olym- 
pics. Plans call for a complete 
mobile station possibly set up 
in a light aircraft to move quick- 
ly from place to place. His 
itinerary of well over 100 coun- 
tries will warm the hearts of 
many DXers. George has some 
11,000 contacts from H5 and S8 
and he reports that the gear for 
Vendaland is already in place. 

Speaking of those new Afri- 
can homeland countries, you 
should be hearing Vendaland 
and Qwa-Qwa before the year is 
out. These two, along with H5, 
Bophuthatswana, and SB, Tran- 
skei, should be added to the 
ARRL DXCC countries list as 
soon as WARC 79 is history. 
They most certainly will be 
made retroactive to their in- 
dependence dates, so go ahead 
and work them even though 
they won't count for a while. 
There is also the possibility that 
South Bophuthatswana will 
count separately from North 
Bophuthatswana. so work all 
the H5s you hear until you are 
sure you have them both, 
ZS6BOK/H5 was in South 
Bophuthatswana; H5AA was 
North. 

IP5CJA, on during the WPX 
contest last March f was on 
Montecrlsto Island in the 
Tyrrhenian Sea, part of the 
Tuscan Archipelago. This is a 
wildlife conservancy like 
Desecheo Island and is a& 
ministered by the Italian Depart- 
ment of the Interior. Only two 
operators are allowed on the 
island at once and for only four 
days. Although Montecristo 
Island would appear to qualify 
as a new country under the 
same ^distinctively separate 
administration" that qualified 
Desecheo, the ARRL has so far 
rejected the 11311305" claims. 

W4BAA is looking to close 
out the logs for the 9L1JM 
operation from November, 1974, 
to September, 1978. The station 
has returned to Holland, so if 
you still need a GSL, it's now or 
forever hold your peace. 

VQ9JJ and VQ9KK are on 
Diego Garcia for a long stay and 
plan to be active on 28545 kHz 
and 21352 kHz, QSL to W5RU 

That AX6 prefix marked the 
visit of Prince Charles to 
Western Australia on the 150th 
anniversity of settlement there 
In the old west. 

Continued on page 158 



22 






JAime 



_ 



♦ VP2GMR 

9Y4SF 



J H30DB 




IC-701, Your Synthesized Passport 



Enter the exciting world of HF DX with 
ICOM's outstanding, fully synthesized 
IC-701, Globe -spanning QSO's are as 
easy as hook-up and tune-in. Complete 
installation requires only a good 50 Ohm 
antenna and an AC power plug-in, Your 
IC-701 comes with everything else you 
need for beginning DX transmissions, in- 
cluding the matching IC-701PS external 
speaker and power supply, the fine 
SM-2 base microphone, and even two 
built-in VFO's. 

Turn on the power, and the world's at 
your single fingertip. The IC-701 lets you 
scan all the Amateur HF bands from 
160M to 10M {plus some MARS coverage 
above and below some of the Ham 
bands) with one finger No more fool- 
ing around with two or more tuning 
knobs, and no complicated return ng 
when you QSY 

When talking on your IC-701, you get a 

200 watt PEP input signal whose punch is 
significantly increased by the high quality 



built-in RF speech processor. This makes 
your 200 watts sound like so much more 
that we recommend you leave the speech 
processor on all the time. 

For adding on frequency memory and 
remote frequency control, the IC-701 s 
synthesizer is completely compatable 
with ICOM's RM2 remote computer con- 
troller: and with ICOMs optional EX1 
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DAIWA CN-720 SWR 
AND POWER METER 

Take one look at the new 
Daiwa CN-720 swr and power 
meter and you'll realize that it's 
something unique among ham 
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meters, which display only one 
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the CN-720 simultaneously dis- 
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power; and swr— on a single 
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Actually, the concept of the 
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time, which might seem like 
convenience enough, but Daiwa 
has gone a step further. In the 
area where the forward and re- 
flected power pointers cross 
one another, there is a third 
scale designed to indicate swr. 
Simply note the point where the 
two pointers cross and swr can 
be read directly from the scale. 
Thus, you can monitor all three 
important quantities at the 
same time on one dial face. 
Believe me, this makes trans- 
mitter and antenna tuner ad- 
justments a snap. 

The front panel of the CN720 
contains a single control switch 
which is used to set the power 
range of the meter at 20, 200, or 
1000 Watts. When rf is applied 
to the meter, one of three LED 



indicators is illuminated as a 
reminder of the power level you 
have selected, 

The rear panel features three 
SO-239s for connection of the 
station transceiver along with 
two antennas (or one antenna 
and a dummy load). A built-in 
slide switch allows selection of 
either antenna without resort- 
ing to an external coax switch— 
a definite plus. 

The CN-720 is housed in a 
rugged all-metal enclosure 
measuring 7" Wx4%"Hx 5" D. 
An electrically identical unit, 
Model GN-620, is available in a 
more compact case measuring 
6V 2 rl W x 3" H x 3vr D. Both 
units are rated for legal limit 
power from 1.8-150 MHz. All 
features of the CN-720 are re- 
tained in the 620— the only dif- 
ference is the size. Those want- 
ing a large, easy-to-read meter 
would probably choose the 720. 
Where small size and weight are 
important, the 620 is a better 
choice, Styling is a subjective 
factor, of course, but I find these 
meters very attractive; they 
should look good in most any 
ham shack. J. W. Milter Divi- 
sion, Belt industries, PO Box 
5825 t Gompton CA 90224. 
Reader Service number 847, 

Jeff DeTray WB8BTH/1 
Assistant Publisher 

BROADBAND UHFYAG IS 
Cushcraft Corporation has 
announced 2 new broadband 
Proline 6-element yagis for UHF 
service. Both models offer 
10-dBd forward gain, 20-dB 
front-to-back ratio, 10-MHz 
bandwidth, and 50-Ohm UHF 
connector termination. They 
come complete with hardware 
lor versatile end-mount installs- 




One of CushcrafVs new UHF yagis. 



tions. Designated models 
P456-6 (450-460 MHz) and P467-6 
(460-470 MHz), they require no 
tuning and are ideal for situa- 
tions where relatively inexpen- 
sive yet durable antennas are 
required. For further informa- 
tion, contact Cushcraft Cor- 
pom t ion, PO Box 4680, Man- 
chester NH 03108. Reader Ser- 
vice number C67. 

1.4-GHZ, 10DIGIT 
FREQUENCY COUNTER 

Optoelectronics, lnc. f has 
just announced an ali-new, top- 
of-the-line, ac-dc portable multi- 
function counter/timer Dubbed 
the MCT 9010, this state-oMhe- 
art unit has a most impressive 
list of features, all of which are 
standard, including a precision 



temperaturB-compen sated 10- 
MHz crystal timebase (0-1 ppm, 
tcxo 17-40° C) with an aging rate 
of less than 1 ppm/year guaran- 
teed, four functions (frequency, 
period, ratio, and totalize), 8 
gate times from .01 second to 20 
seconds, a low-frequency multi- 
plier for resolution of ,001 Hz 
below 5 kHz T resolution to 1 Hz 
through 1.4 GHz, and a variable 
sensitivity attenuator with a 
typical sensitivity of 1-20 mV 
rms from 10 Hz to 1 GHz. 

Provided with each MCT 9010 
will be a "Certificate of Com- 
pliance" certifying the time- 
base stability, aging, and NBS 
calibration traceabtlity. For fur- 
ther information, contact Op- 
toelectronics, Inc., 5821 N.E. 
14th Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale FL 





Daiwa *s CN-720 swr and power meter 



Optoelectronics* MCT 9010 counter. 



24 




B&K-Precision f s new digital puiser probe. 



33334: (305)-771 -2050/1. Reader 
Service number 03. 

MODEL HG-S2SS CRANK-UP 
TOWER 

Hy-Gain Electronics, a divi- 
sion of Telex Communications, 
Inc.. has announced the Model 
HG-52 self-supporting tower. 
The HG-52SS is designed to 
support 9.0 sq, ft. of antenna 
area with winds up to 50 mph. 
This all-steel tower has the ad- 
vantage of an improved guide 
system which allows the tubing 
to be open at each end, ensur- 
ing complete galvanizing and 
total moisture drainage, 

The HG-52S5 will accommo- 
date standard rotators. A thrust 
bearing can be bolted to the top 
section to allow a 2-inch mast. 
For further information, contact 
Hy-Gain Electronics, 8601 
Northeast Hwy, 6, Lincoln NE 
68505; (402)-467-5321 . Reader 
Service number H4, 

NEW DIGITAL PULSER PROBE 
ANNOUNCED BY DYNASCAN 

The B&K-Precision product 
group of Dynascan Corporation 
has just Introduced a new 
digital pulser probe. The new 
unit, designated as Model DP- 
100, is designed as an aid to 
fast analysis and debugging of 
integrated circuit logic sys- 
tems. 

The DP- 100 generates a sin* 
gle pulse in the "one-shot 11 
mode or a 5-Hz pulse train in the 
continuous output mode. Sim- 
pie to operate, the DP-100 can 
be used alone or in conjunction 
with a logic probe or oscil- 
loscope. When the probe output 
is applied to a circuit, it will 
automatically pull an existing 
logic low to a high state or an 
existing high state to a low. By 
observing the change in circuit 
output, the user can isolate 
faulty circuits and components. 
Applied test energy is limited to 
only 0,33% of the normal power 



dissipation of a good device, 
This ensures that circuit dam- 
age cannot result from the 
DP-100 test procedure. 

For full versatility, the DP-100 
is compatible with DTL, TTU 
RTL, and CMOS logic circuits. 
Operating power is derived from 
the circuit under test, so bat- 
teries are not required. Like 
other B&K-Precision products, 
the DP-100 is well protected 
against overvoltage or polarity 
reversal. The output (probe tip) 
is protected to ±35 volts and 
the input power leads are pro- 
tected to ±160 V dc and 117 V 
ac. 

For additional information, 
contact B&K-Precision, Dyna- 
scan Corporation, 6460 West 
Cortland Street ; Chicago IL 
60635; (312)-889-9087. Reader 
Service number B45. 

80-METER ANTENNA TRAPS 

Unadilla has added a pair of 
80-meter antenna traps (the 
KW*80} to its line of 10-15-20-40- 
mef er series. The KW-80 takes 1 
kW, is weatherized, and is 
available for the CW band (KW- 
80C) or the phone band (KW- 
S0F). For further information, 
contact Microwave Fifter Com- 
pany, inc., 6743 Kinne St., East 
Syracuse NY 13057; (315W37- 
3953. Reader Service number 
U9. 

MODEL TH5DX FOR 10-15-20 
METERS 

Hy*Gain Electronics has in- 
troduced the newest member of 
its famous Thunderbird line of 
triband antennas. The TH5DX 
offers outstanding performance 
on 20, 15, and 10 meters, it fea- 
tures 5 elements on an 1 8-foot 
boom, with 3 act ive elements on 
15 and 20 meters and 4 active 
elements on 10 meters. The 
TH5DX also features separate 
air-dielectric Hy-Q traps for 
each band. This allows the 







Unaditla's new KW-80 80-meter antenna trap. 



TH5DX to be set for the maxi 
mum F/B ratio and the minimum 
beamwidth possible for a tri- 
band antenna of this size. Also 
standard on this antenna are 
Hy-Galn's unique beta-match, 
rugged boom-to-mast bracket. 



Ham Help 



As a radio amateur, I like very 
much to experiment and try dif- 
ferent approaches to various 
problems. I am sure that there 
are more persons, in many 
fields, who are doing the same 
thing: experimenting with 
various facets of scientific 
problems in the hope of finding 
a better/cheaper/more-efficient 
way of doing things, or doing 
things that supposedly cannot 
be done. 

At this time, there is an orga- 
nization being started to bring 
together, in one group, various 
clubs and individuals who 
might be called amateur scien- 
tists. The organization is called, 
aptly enough, the Amateur 
Scientist Research Organiza- 
tion. Anyone interested can find 
out more by writing to ASRO, 
PO Box 4, McMechen WV 26040. 
We will be glad to send him the 
latest newsletter and bulletin. 
There is no charge or obligation. 

Also, there is a net planned 
for the ham members. We feel 
that this organization fills a 
definite need in the world of the 
amateur scientist. We are open 
for suggestions from all per- 
sons. 

Richard S. Meyer WD8BJ W 

134 Jims Run 
McMechen WV 26040 

I have a military surplus unit 
labeled TYPE CFN-46ADT RF 
TO IF CONVERTER, SERIAL 
737, A unit of model BP Radio 
EqpL, Navy Dept.— Bureau of 



taper-swaged elements, and im- 
proved element compression 
clamps. For further information, 
contact Hy-Gain Electronics, 
8601 Northeast Hwy. 6, Lincoln 
NE 68505; (402) 461 5321, 
Reader Service number H4. 



Ships, Farnsworth TV & Radio 
Corp, I would appreciate any in* 
formation on frequency cover- 
age, H output frequency, volt- 
ages, etc. Many thanks. 

J, O. Dickinson W4LLF 

1408 Monmouth Court West 

Richmond VA 23233 

I will be visiting the United 
States and Canada for 3 weeks 
in August of this year, and I 
would like to meet local 
amateurs as I pass through. 
Having the equivalent of a 
Technician's callsign, I do not 
know many hams stateside. 

Being originally from VU2, I 
shall be bringing along some 
slides on VU2 and ZL and will be 
happy to talk about them. I shall 
be spending a week each in 
Concord CA f Point Pleasant NJ. 
and Toronto, Canada, with no 
fixed plans, so I would appre- 
ciate advice on local attrac- 
tions, 2-meter repeaters, ham 
shops, etc. (All letters will be 
answered.) I have also been a 
broadcast-band SWL for some 
years and would like to hear 
from SWLs, too, 

Ashok Nallawalla 

PO Box 144 

Dunedin, New Zealand 

I need a February, 1950, copy 
of CQ to copy an article, I will 
return it to the owner in good 
shape. Thank you. 

Richard E. Flarida K0BJA 

2267 Star Route 183 

Atwater OH 44201 



2$ 



Ham Help 



I am Interested in obtaining 
information on the World Radio 
Laboratories Model S8 175 
transmitter. I am particularly in- 
terested in converting the DSB 
to SSB, and would also (ike to 
know about any other success- 
ful modifications that have 
been made to this unit. 

I am also interested in ob- 
taining a schematic on a digital 
frequency display for the FRG-7 
receiver; using either an exter- 
nal frequency counter or a sepa- 
rate readout. 

Rex D. Faulkner 

341 3 Covington Drive 

Augusta GA 30909 

I would like to get in touch 
with any hams who are interest- 
ed in or own antique and classic 
cars, for the purpose of starting 



a classic car net on 15 meters. 
When writing, please list the 
car(s) (if any) you own. 

Gary Carter WA4IAM 

329 Oakdale Rd 
Rocky Mount NC 27801 

I would like to get In contact 
with a ham in the Peoria, Il- 
linois, area who could help me 
with code practice for my 
General ticket. 

Patrick Butler 

3208 W. Greenwood PI. 

Peoria I L 61615 

Does anyone have a sche- 
matic for the Hatlicrafters 
TXO. Electronic Keyer, Model 
HA-4? I will gladly pay copying 
cost and postage. 

Bill Hurt WD4RMA 

Rt.1, Box212A 

Zirconia NC 28790 



Anyone interested in starting 
an informal net for hunters, 
shooters, and fishermen on 
about 21.400-410 MHz daily at 
15002? Drop me a card or meet 
on frequency. 

Art Santella K1VKO 

43 Seaview Ave, 

East Norwaik CT 06855 

i am interested in becoming a 
QSL manager for any OX sta- 
tion. 

Dennis Younker WA60YV 

45255 Raysack T Apt. 2 

Lancaster CA 93534 

I am trying to make a Gonset 
GSB-2 Model 900B with a Model 
901 A work again, 

I need a manual, a sche- 
matic, and alignment info, 

I will be glad to pay any 
reasonable cost for copies and 
mailing. Thank You, 

R. Maag K6IUP 

40103 87th St, W. 

Leona Valley CA 93550 



I am very curious to know if 
there exists an unconverted, un- 
tampered with, working or not. 
Motorola HT-220 for sale which 
costs less than the national 
debt. 

David Pilipauskas WB9HPJ 

6649 S. Fairfield 

Chicago IL 60629 

I would like to purchase a 
manual or schematic for a Kaar 
UHF transceiver {model 
12TR510A), which I plan to con- 
vert to 440 MHz. The manufac- 
turer is no longer in business. 

N orris Saari W7LAP 

13535 53rd Ave. So, 

Seattle WA 98168 

I would like to hear from 
anyone using the new Attas 
RX-110 and TXH0L combina- 
tion. I'm interested in the com- 
ments and experiences of 
others who are using this setup. 

Keith Arnold N8AQR 

1273 Erickson Ave, 

Columbus OH 43227 



Social E/ents 



Listings in this column are 
provided free of charge on a 
space-avaitabie basis. The 



following information should be 
included in every announce- 
ment: sponsor, event, date. 




time, place, city, state, admis- 
sion charge (if any), features, 
talk-in frequencies, and the 
name of whom to contact for 
further information. Announce- 
ments must be received two 
months prior to the month in 
which the event takes place, 

UPPER HUTT NZ 

JUN 14 

The 1979 Annual Conference 
of the New Zealand Associa- 
tion of Radio Transmitters will 
be held on June 1-4, 1979, at 
Upper Hutt, New Zealand. 
Visitors are welcome to attend 
this conference- For registra- 
tion forms, contact the 
Secretary, 1979 Conference 
Committee, PO Box 40-212, Up- 
per Hutt NZ. 

ST. PAUL MN 
JUN 2 

The North Area Repeater As- 
sociation, Inc., will hold its 
Amateur Fair 79 on Saturday, 
June 2, 1979, at the Minnesota 
State Fairgrounds, St. Paul. 
Minnesota. This is a swapfest 
and exposition for amateur 
radio operators and computer 
hobbyists. There will be free 
overnight parking for self- 
contained campers on June 1st 
only. You may sell from your 
car in the giant flea market or 
from the available inside 
space. There will be AMSAT 
and microprocessor exhibits, 
FCC, ARRL T Minnesota Repeat- 
er Council booths, and many 
prizes. Admission is $2.00. For 
information or reservations for 
commercial space, write Ama* 
teur Fair, PO Box 30O54, St. 
Paul MM 55175. 

WENATCHEE WA 

JUN 2-3 

The Apple City Amateur 



Radio club will hold its Nam 
Fest on June 2-3, 1979, at Rocky 
Reach Dam. 7 mites north of the 
city on Highway 97, Wenatch- 
ee, Washington. Registra- 
tion fee for amateurs is $3.00 
(which includes one ticket for 
the prize drawing), $1,00 for 
non-amateurs, and children 
under 12 are free, A banquet 
dinner will be held on Saturday 
night at $5.00 per person. Free 
camp/trailer space will be pro- 
vided at the park. Featured will 
be equipment displays, a VHF 
tune-up clinic, an arts and 
crafts show^sale. a swap shop, 
a photography display, ex- 
hibits, a tour of the Power 
House, a film on the Life of 
Thomas Edison, and a potluck 
dinner on Sunday at 1:00 pm. 
For information and reserva- 
tions, contact the Apple City 
Amateur Radio Club, 713 
Grandview Avenue, Wenatchee 
W A 98801. 

ISLIP LI NY 
JUN 3 

The Long Island Mobile Ama- 
teur Radio Club, Inc.. will hold 
its Long Island Hamfair 79 on 
June 3, 1979, from 9:00 am to 
4:00 pm at the Islip Speedway, 
on Islip Avenue (Rte. 111), just 
one block south of the South- 
ern State Parkway, Exit 43, or 
south on 111 from Exit 56 of the 
Long Island Expressway, Islip, 
Long Island. New York, There 
will be over 250 exhibitors. 
General admission is $1.50 and 
exhibitors' admission is $3-00 
per space. Wives, sweethearts, 
and children under 12 are ad- 
mitted free. There will be many 
door prizes available for all 
ticket holders. Talk-in on 
14&25/.65 and .52. The rain date 

Continued on page 164 



26 



^ Reader Service—see page 195 



MFJ ENTERPRISES INC >979 




NEW MFJ-962 1.5 KW Versa Tuner 

For $159.95 you can ran up to 1.5 KW PEP and match everything from 
1.8 thru 30 MHz: coax, balanced line, random wire. Built-in balun. SWR, 
dual range forward and reflected power meter. Flexible six position an- 
tenna switch. Outstanding value. Whm #/ „ can you gBt m 1Jf KW 

Tuner with SWR, dual range 
forward and reflected powar 
meter, antenna switch and balun 
for only . . . 




**i WTO 



W4TCHINC 



M " 



/7& 



MATCMM 



ANTENNA 



INDUCTOR 



1 'J*n t , 

:1IIH - 




VU i Ml* I fl lift it I 



\V*I 



\ MlO**,TT 5£RiES 



MOOEl WFJ-M3 



Tht NEW MFJ-962 1.5 KW Vena Tuner ■ lets 
you run up to 1.5 KW PEP and match any teed- 
line continuously from 1,8 to 30 MHz: coax, 
balanced line or random wire. 

This gives you maximum power transfer 
your antenna for solid OSOs and attenuates har 
monies to reduce TV I and out of- band emission 

An accurate meter gives SWR. forward, reflect 
ed power in 2 ranges (2000 and 200 watts). 

A llexible six position antenna switch Fets you 
select 2 coax lines thru tuner or direct, or ran 






dom wire and balanced fine. 

A new all metal, low profile cabinet gives you 
RFI protection, rigid construction, and sleek styling. 
Black finish. Black front panel has reverse letter 
ing 5x14x14 inches. A flip down wire stand tilts 
tuner for easy viewing. 

Efficient, encapsulated 4:1 ferrtte balun. 500 
pi 6000 volt capacitors, 12 position inductor. 
Ceramic rotary switch. 2% meter 

Built-in quality. Every single unit is tested for 
performance and inspected for quality. Solid 



American construction, quality components. One 
year limited warranty. 

For your nearest MFJ dealer, call toll free 
800 647 1800, Stop by your dealer. Compare it 
feature foi feature with other tuners. Compare its 
value, its quality and its performance 

After a truly side by side companion, you'll 
be convinced that its value, quality and features 
make it a truly outstanding value 

Why not visit your dealer today? II no dealer 
is available order direct from MFJ. 



MFJ-961 1,5 KW VERSA TUNER ill has balun . six position antenna switch. Matches coax, 
balanced line, random wire, from 1.8 to 30 MHz. 

6 position antenna switch lets 
you select 2 coax lines thru tuner 
or direct, or random wire and 
balanced line. 




The MFJ-961 1,5 KW Vena Tuner ■ gives you 
a flexible six position antenna switch, ft lets you 
select 2 coax lines ttmj tuner or direct, or ran- 
dom wire and balanced line. 

Run 1,5 KW PEP. Match any feedlrne from 1.8 
to 30 MHz: coax, balanced line, random wire. 

Gives maximum power transfer. Harmonic at- 
tenuation reduces TV!, out of band emissions. 



Black an metal cabinet Black front panel has 
reverse lettering. Flip down wire stand tilts tuner. 
5x14x14 inches. 

Encapsulated 4:1 ferine balun, 500 pt r 6000 
volt capacitors. 12 posit ton inductor, ceramic 
switches. SO-239s, ceramic feedthrus. One year 
limited warranty. 

Every single unit is tested for performance and 



inspected for quality Solid American construction, 
quality components. 

For your nearest MFJ deafer, call toll-free 
800-647-1800. Visrt your dealer and compare. 
You'll find real value 

Why not see the NEW MFJ-961 1.5 KW Versa 
Tuner HI at your dealer's today? If no dealer is 
available order direct from MFJ. 



FOR YOUR NEAREST DEALER OR FOR ORDERS 

CALL TOLL-FREE 800-647- 1 



Order any product from MFJ and try it It not delighted, return within 30 days for a prompt refund (less shipping). 
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Order By Mail or Call TOLL FREE 800-647-1800 and Charge It On 

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v* Reader Service— see page 195 



27 



Add Digital Display for $50 



100-Hz accuracy 



A useful addition to your shack 



Richard C. Jaeger K41QJ 
1599 Gonzaio Road 
Boca Raton FL 33432 



Several years ago, I de- 
cided that a digital 
readout for my R4B re^ 
ceiver would be a worth- 
while addition to my 
shack After reviewing ex- 
isting articles describing 
counters and vfo readouts, 
the counter in Fig. 1 was 
designed, which was simi- 
lar to one described in Ham 
Radio, l 

Only the vfo signal is 
measured, which avoids 
the complexity of sequen- 



ce VFO 

SIGNAL * 

$445-4955 «Kji 



HfPyT 
BUFFER 



tially measuring the fre- 
quency of several oscilla- 
tors. The signal from the 
vfo in the R4B r which tunes 
from 5445 kHz down to 
4995 kHz, was mixed in a 
digital mixer (7474) with 
the output of a crystal 
oscillator at 5445 kHz, to 
produce a difference signal 
in the range of 0-500 kHz. 
Since I wanted the abili- 
ty to accurately calibrate 
the display, a variable 
capacitor was used to ad- 
just the frequency of the 
crystal oscillator which fed 
the digital mixer, so 
that the counter could be 
adjusted to zero on each 
band. The output of the 
mixer was fed to the count- 



SEVEM 
SEGMENT 

DtSPLAVS 



E 



100 H* 



DECODER- 
DRIVERS 



I j ft * a 



74AT 



MIXER 
►474 



0-5DOKHJ 




CHTSTHL 



I 



544SKHI 






7490 



E 



ing circuitry, which dis- 
played a three-digit count 
(10 kHz, 1 kHz, 100 Hz] fif- 
ty times per second. A 
50-Hz flicker rate in the 
LED display is not detect- 
able by the eye, and 
eliminates the need for 
latches between the out- 
put of the decade counters 
and the seven-segment de- 
coder-drivers. 

After using this readout 
for over six months, I 
decided that the overall 
performance was not satis- 
factory. First, the three 
digits did not display suffi- 
cient information. I found 
that 1 was constantly refer- 
ring to the receiver dial to 
determine in which 100- 



*>v 



i 



i KHI 



JO «Hj 



74 47 



T447 



7490 



CLEAR 



COUHT EMBLE dOtSECt 



/n 



7430 



H«fE BASE AW 
CONTROL LOGIC 



STROM 



Fig. 1. Block diagram of the first digital readout 



kHz band segment I was 
operating. Second, since 
the basic count interval 
was 10 ms r and the counter 
was not synchronized to 
the input signal, the low- 
order digit flickered annoy- 
ingly between two values. 
Finally, the frequency ad- 
justment obtained with the 
simple variable crystal 
oscillator was not suffi- 
cient to cover the variation 
in hfo mixer crystals in the 
receiver. So, a second 
design was undertaken 
with the aim of correcting 
the faults which had be- 
come apparent in the ex- 
isting display. 

The new version of the 
display corrects the prob- 
lems discussed above, and 
can be built for less than 
$50 if all of the parts 
are purchased new. The 
display was designed with 
four digits and 100-Hz 
resolution, as shown in the 
block diagram of Fig t 2. 
The incoming signal is first 
divided by ten, and the 
basic count interval in 
creased to 100 ms, to 
eliminate the flicker in the 
last digit. 

After some thought, I 
realized that mixing the 
vfo signal to produce the 
0^500-kHz signal represent- 
ed unneeded complexity. 
Measurement of the vfo 



26 



signal could be done di 
rectly by simply down- 
counting or subtracting, 
rather than counting up- 
ward in the counters. To 
accomplish this, preset- 
table down-counters 
(74192s) are used and 
preset to 455.0. When the 
signal from the vfo at 
5455.0 is subtracted from 
this count, the correct 
reading of 000.0 is dis- 
played in the lower four 
digits. The most significant 
digit is dropped. When the 
vfo is tuned to 4955,0, the 
display will show 500,0 
kHz. To display readings 
corresponding to 500.0 to 
999,9, the preset count is 
changed to 955.0. Circuitry 
for the counter and display 
is shown in Fig. 3. 

Using the presettable 
down-counters also solves 
the problem of how to cali- 
brate the readout. Instead 
of presetting the two low- 
order digits to fixed values, 
the preset values are deter- 
mined by the contents of 
two additional decade 
counters (7490s). The con- 
tents of these two counters 
may be altered by simply 
pulsing their inputs until 
the preset is correct to 
calibrate the counter- The 
preset value in these two 
digits ranges from + to 
9.9, corresponding to an 
adjustment range of — 5 
kHz and +4.9 kHz about 
the nominal frequency 
This range represents a suf- 
ficient adjustment range 
for the crystals used in the 
receiver and corresponds 
to approximately a 0.01% 
or greater tolerance on the 
mixer crystals used in the 
R4B receiver, In the digital 
readout for the R4B, the 
third digit is always preset 
to the value 5, The fourth 
digit is preset to either 4 or 
9, depending upon which 
500-kHz segment is being 
used, and is selected by a 
front panel switch. 

The vfo range and preset 

number are also shown in 
Table 1 for other rigs which 
were available to me, The 



4 



SEVEN 



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R4B tffO IUPWT 
544S-494S KHl 



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7447 




7475 



l<J %ni 



744 7 



74 73 



L 



Tl 



COUAITEB 
74192 



Z2 



109 4Mt 



'447 



7475 



LI 



XI 



COUNTER 
74192 



>77 /ft 



5 MMj 



-to* 

74*0*1 



I 



5Ht 



COHTROV 
LOGIC 



m 



DECADE 
COUNTER 
7490 



COUNT GATE 



1 



■ * » 



J447 



74 75 



DOWN- 
COUNTER 
74192 



DECADE 
COUNTER 

749 



24 ZK 






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Heath line of vfos do not 
have the convenient 5-kHz 
offset. However, switch- 
selectable preset can easi- 
ly be added to the third 
digit of the counter. It 



should also be possible to 
shift the heterodyne oscil- 
lator crystals with a 
capacitor, in order to en- 
sure that an offset always 
exists. A third alternative is 



to replace the oscillator 
crystals with new ones off- 
set by 5 kHz, 

The timebase circuitry 
(Fig. 4) is of straightforward 
design. A counter chain 



29 



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Fig. 5, Timebase and control logic for the digital readout 



divides the output of a 
5-MHz oscillator down to 5 
Hz. One intermediate di- 
vider stage is wired in di- 
vide-by-two, divide-by-ftve 
fashion, so that 100-kHz f 
50-kHz, and 25-kHz out- 
puts are available and may 
be switch-selected for cali- 
brator purposes, if desired. 
The control signals were 
designed to be of minimum 
complexity. As shown in 
rig. 5, the timebase output 
is a signal with a 200-ms 
period During one 100-ms 
period, the contents of the 
counter are gated to the 
display latches, and con- 
tinuously displayed on the 
seven-segment displays. 
The preset values are then 
gated into the counters, 
and the counter is ready to 
measure the input signal. 
During the next 100-ms 
period, the counters are 
decremented by the input 



signal, and the cycle then 
repeats itself. 

The vfo signal from the 
R4B is obtained at the out- 
put of the tow-pass filter 
(C132, L6, CI 49) which is 
connected to the output of 
the vfo unit as shown in Fig. 
6, The signal is tapped off 
at the junction of C1 49 and 
L6 through a .01 -uF capac- 
itor. An attachment is 
made to the circuit board 
mounted directly behind 
the af gain control, and the 
wire is routed along the 
side of the chassis to a 
phono socket installed in 
the spare position on the 
back of the R4B 

The digital readout was 
packaged with its power 
supply in a small cabinet. 
The power supply (Fig. 7) 
uses a full-wave bridge rec- 
tifier with a capacitive fil- 
ter, followed by an LM309 
5-volt regulator The seven- 



Transceiver 


Vto range 


Preset 


Mode 


HW-101. SB-101 


5500-5000 


500 


Down count 


HW-32 


1770-1620 


970 


Down count 



Table T. 



segment displays do not re- 
quire regulated voltage, 
and the display drivers 
(7447) can use a segment 
supply of up to 15 volts 
Power for the seven-seg* 
ment displays is therefore 
tapped off ahead of the 
regulator, in order to 
minimize dissipation in the 
regulator. The filter capac- 
itors were chosen to max 
imize the ripple at the 
regulator input, while en- 
suring that the regulator 
does not drop out of 
regulation, This can be 
done easily using an 
oscilloscope, and also 
minim izes regulator 
dissipation. The displays 
are mounted in a socket 
assembly and bezel unit 
which adds immeasurably 
to the overall appearance 
of the display. 

A toggle switch selects 
either a 0-500,0 or 500*0- 
999.9 display. Two push- 
buttons are used to cal- 
ibrate the two low-order 
digits of the display 



Calibration is accom- 
plished by first adjusting 
the receiver to zero-beat 
with the calibrator signal 
This can be done quite ac- 
curately by watching the 
S-meter as the receiver is 
adjusted to zero-beat. At 
zero-beat, the S-meter 
needle will waver back and 
forth at a low frequency. 
After the receiver is ad- 
justed to zero-beat, the 
two buttons on the readout 
are depressed until the 
readout displays the cor- 
rect frequency One will 
get the hang of this adjust- 
ment after a little practice. 
The calibration obtained is 
well within the 100-Hz 
resolution of the readout, 
and the display accurately 
reads out the frequency to 
which the receiver is tuned 
to within 100 Hz. The 
stability of the timebase in 
the counter has been found 
to be more than adequate 
for this resolution. Drift of 
the timebase has been 
measured to be less than 
100 Hz from a cold start. 

This version of the 
readout has been in use 
now for approximately two 

years, and has proved to be 
a useful addition to the 
shack. The display permits 
an accurate QSY, allowing 
one to return to the exact 
frequency of a desired sta- 
tion during contests or 
when chasing DX. The 
calibration feature also 
allows the offset associat- 
ed with CW reception (100- 
1000-Hz) to be removed, so 
that the display indicates 
the frequency of the re- 
ceived signal directly. ■ 

Reference 

I. Gerd H. Schrfck, "Digital 
Readout Variable Frequency 
Oscillator Ham Radio, 
January. 1973. pp 14-19. 



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30 




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ATLAS 21 Ox 
TRANSCEIVERS 
SOLD IN 5 YEARS 

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LIMITED EDITION 



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Phone (714) 433-1983 



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PO Box 2085 
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TEXAS IMSTRUttEIUTS 



Fig, 7. A simple three-terminal integrated circuit regulator can easily be added to almost 
any receiver low-voltage supply to improve hum, ripple, and circuit decoupling. The ex- 
ample circuit is taken from the Drake R-4C. 



Modern receiver equip- 
ment designs often 
become obsolete before 
they can be manufactured, 
tested, and sold. Unfortu- 
nately, highly-reliable 
printed circuit boards al- 
most freeze the perfor- 
mance design of many sol- 
id-state receivers. Some of 
the more exotic, sophisti- 
cated technologies are dif- 
ficult to add to miniatur- 
ized solid-state receivers or 
transceivers. Marketing 
policies don't make a print- 
ed circuit board substitu- 
tion upgrade possible But, 
within the decade, the in- 
creasing costs of receivers 
will make this a very profit- 
able market either for orig- 
inal manufacturers or for 
small specialty-electronics 
firms. One of the really big 
advantages of vacuum- 
tube equipment is that usu- 
ally the normally spacious 
layout permits easy main- 
tenance as well as "grace- 
ful" upgrading in the ham 
shack. 

Several field changes 
that utilize new high- 
performance components 
and circuit concepts are 

described in this article. 



32 



Some of them are not even 
standard equipment in the 
latest off-the-shelf solid- 
state receivers. For exam- 
ple, a high-performance, 
wide dynamic range, 
doubly-balanced modula- 
tor with all of the ad- 
justments factory-set 
within the device can be 
added very easily to almost 
any receiver. The popular 
Drake R-4B and R-4C radio 
receivers are used as 
typical examples of how 
older receiver perfor- 
mance can be upgraded by 
simple field changes. 
Greater local oscillator 
suppression, better crystal 
filter floors, and a wide 
dynamic range product 
detector are among the 
easy-to-make changes that 
produce a big difference in 
performance. None of the 
field-change improve- 
ments takes over 45 min- 
utes to incorporate. 

Low-voltage Power Supply 

A miniature, 3-terminal, 
integrated circuit, 12-volt 
regulator can replace the 
high-voltage (150 V dc) 
drop-down sources while 
greatly improving the hum 
and rectifier hash noise. 
The lower source impe- 
dance of an electronic 
regulator can improve 
distortion problems. A big 
improvement for Drake 
equipment is the removal 
of the drop-down resistors 
and transformer which pro- 
duce 1 5 Watts of heat This 
improvement will increase 
the component reliability 
of the receiver; and will 
also reduce vfo drift. 

Presently, the 11 volts is 
obtained through a power- 
dropping resistor from the 
150-volt line, A reference 
source for the 14-volt line 
is obtained through an- 
other power-dropping 
resistor from the 150 volts. 
A capacitance-multiplying 
transistor circuit smooths 
the 14 volts, but the ripple 
output is still greater than 
50 millivolts on many pow- 
er supplies. 



The three-terminal voltage 
regulator reduces the rip* 
pie and hash to less than 2 
millivolts. 

At a cost of less than $3, 
the change takes only 45 
minutes to make. Refer to 
Fig. 1. Here are the pro- 
cedures: 

1. Install the 3-terminal 
LM340T-12 voltage regula- 
tor (manufactured by 
either TI or National) on 
the third mixer, V4 (6EJ7), 
shield just above and on 
the same side as pin 9 of 
the tube socket. Use a 
small general-purpose 
finned heat sink mounted 
under the integrated cir- 
cuit tab. Drill a 9/32" hole 
and use 6-32 hardware. 

2. Remove these parts: 
Q2 — E P-487, regulator 
transistor; 

CR18/19— B565, rectifiers; 
C201— 20 uF, electrolytic 
capacitor; 

R1 15-6,800 Ohm, 5-Watt 

resistor; 

R116-5,600 Ohm, 5-Watt 

resistor. Note the location 

of the bottom hole (chassis 

end) where the resistor is 

removed, labeled point 

"A" in Fig. 1; you'll need it 

later. 

The wi re to C1 67 A, 1 000-u F 

electrolytic capacitor 

(marked C166 on some 

schematics). 



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Fig. 2. If the low-voltage winding doesn't provide enough 
voltage to the integrated circuit voltage regulator, the 63 
Vac filament winding can be used with a simple half-wave 
rectifier to boost the voltage* 



Caution: Stay away from 
the upper holes where the 
power resistors were re- 
moved. Accidental con- 
nection to this 150-volt line 
can cause damage! 

3. Wire point B" at the 
dc input of the otd Q2 
regulator to the new regu- 
lator input, pin 1. 

4. Wire point "C" at the 
dc output of the old Q2 
regulator to the new 
regulator output, pin 2. 
(Ground is made through 
the integrated circuit tab.) 

5. Jumper wire from the 
marked bottom hole of the 
old power resistor, R115 



(6,800 Ohm), point "A" to 
the " + 14 V" [now +12 V) 
bus point where all of the 
red wires are terminated. 
This step connects the 11 V 
line to the new +12 V line. 
The circuit impedance is 
now low enough to prevent 
any interaction. 

6. Add a 2.2 uF non- 
polarized capacitor (25- 
volt minimum) across the 

filament socket as shown 
in Fig. 1. 

7. Check the voltages 
listed in Table 1 after 
visually confirming the wir- 
ing. 

If the existing low- 



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Fig. 3, Proper signal and LO feed and termination techniques are applied to the Drake 
R-4C receiver third mixer. 



33 



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F/g. 4, Diagram of the ready-to-use TL442 doubly-balanced mixer/modulator shows the in- 
ternal functions which require no external controls or additional circuitry. 



voltage transformer wind- 
ing doesn't provide at least 
15 volts, then the 6.3 V ac 
section of the filament 
winding can be used to 
boost the voltage to the 
regulator. Fig. 2 shows how 
to bootstrap the 6.3 V ac 
filament line to the center 
tap of the low-voltage 
winding through the use of 
a simple half-wave rec- 
tifier. The unused C167A, 
1000-uF filter capacitor 
provides sufficient filter- 
ing. The integrated circuit 
does the rest If the voltage 
input to the regulator is too 
high, additional heat sink- 
ing may be required 



Mixer LO and Signal 
Feeding 

Mixers are the first place 
where receiver perfor- 
mance falls short of our ex- 
pectations. If the mixer is 
ahead of the filters, then 
third-order interference is 
created within the amateur 
bands. Specified as 
"dynamic range/' this is 
probably the most strin- 
gent receiver specification. 
If the mixer is after the 
filters, then problems can 
still arise due to the same 
causes, except for one: The 
LO is not radiated back 
through the rf amplifier to 
the antenna to interfere 



with other radio services. 
And, if an audio filter is 
used for CW, then the 
dynamic range of the last 
mixer is not too important 
However, when the LO is 
radiated back into the i-f or 
amplified without attenua- 
tion at the mixer output, 
then the probability that 
spurious responses in the 
receiver will be generated 
greatly increases. The 
same principles apply to 
the i-f signal driving the 
mixer, as far as reducing 
the output of this signal at 
the mixer output 

A modern solution avail- 
able is to use doubly- 



balanced modulators to at 
tenuate each signal at any 
input or output, with only 
the conversion signal ap- 
pearing at the output 
However, in practice, the 
bipolar balanced mixers 
I measured offer about 
10-dB poorer dynamic 
range performance than 
MOSFETs and vacuum 
tubes under optimum cir- 
cuit conditions. Then the 
only really strong case for 
a balanced mixer is where 
the signal or LO are so 
close in frequency to each 
other in the mixer output 
that a tuned circuit cannot 
discriminate against the 
amplified LO and signal in- 
put. 

Balanced mixers do 
solve the spurious signal 
problem. However, many 
tests that I conducted with 
single versus dual-input cir- 
cuits (such as a dual-gate 

MOSFET) have shown that 
the noise figure and 
dynamic range perfor- 
mance are about the same 
either way. 

The primary factor in 
good mixer performance is 
a strong LO signal on the 
order of 250 m V for either a 
vacuum tube or a dual- 
gate MOSFET, fed either 
singly or with dual inputs. 
The dynamic range tends 
to be proportional to the 
gain of the particular 
device Beyond these good 
design practices, an order- 



AUDIO 
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Fig. 5. A communications doubly-balanced modulator/demodulator is applied to the Drake R~4C receiver with a 
minimum of additional parts, No printed circuit board is needed. 



34 



of -magnitude increase in 
sophistication of circuitry 
is required. 

The third mixer in the 
Drake R-4C was chosen to 
demonstrate how to apply 
proper feed and termina- 
tion principles to a mixer. 
As a result, the LO and 
signal radiation was 
reduced. And, the crystal- 
filter rejection floor was 
lowered by reducing 
ground loop radiation. Fig, 
3 shows the circuit before 
and after the improve- 
ments. Note that the 
original circuit provided a 
capacitive divider voltage 
step-up from the LO output 
at point "F" to the crystal- 
filter transformer at point 
"B" to enhance undesired 
radiation. Both the signal 
and the LO signals are ter- 
minated in several ground 
returns at the transformer, 
T6, grid-leak resistor R132, 
and limiting diodes 

CR20/21. 

Good principles of mixer 
feeding were applied. First, 
the signal was fed with the 
grid-leak resistor in parallel 
with the coupling capac- 
itor, thus eliminating this 
ground loop. Then the LO 
was fed in series with the 
signal transformer, T6. 
Therefore, the LO signal 
could not be increased, 
and, furthermore, the LO 
signal is not impressed 
across the secondary of the 
signal transformer, T6. 

A 150-Ohm resistor is 
used to terminate and limit 
the LO voltage output 
while not enhancing har- 
monic generation. Finally, 
a tuned circuit is con- 
nected to the output of the 
mixer to reduce the LO and 
input signal by about 20 
dB. As a result, the signal 
rejection floor of the 
crystal filter is reduced by 
more than 15 dB, and the 
broadband white noise is 
greatly reduced in the SSB 
mode while only slightly 
degrading the narrow-band 
CW mode of operation. 
Here is the procedure for 
incorporating this field 
change: 



1 . Disconnect the 1-meg- 
ohm grid-ieak resistor, 
R132, from ground at point 
"A", Bend it over and 
reconnect to the output 
terminal of the i-f trans- 
former, T6, at point "B". It 
will be in parallel with the 
25-pF coupling capacitor, 
CI 99. 

2. Remove the 18-pF LO 
coupling capacitor, C52, 
from the printed circuit 
board on the bottom near 
the chassis to the grid at 
pin 2 of V4, the 6EJ7 mixer. 

3. Remove the LO coax 
from point "F" on the LO 
printed circuit board on 
the top side of the chassis 
to the printed circuit board 
on the bottom of the 
chassis. 

4. Separate the ground 
lug at point "D" from the 
bottom end of the i-f 
transformer, T6, pin by 
about 3/8 of an inch. 

5. Connect the LO from 
point "F" [where the coax 
was just removed) with 
miniature coax through the 
same chassis hole, routing 
along the output {power 
transformer side) of the 
tube socket to the i-f 
transformer, T6. Connect 
the center conductor to 
the bottom terminal at 
point "C" of the trans- 
former, T6. Connect the 
shield to the ground lug at 
point "D". 

6. Install a new 150-Ohm 
resistor from the bottom 
end of the i-f transformer, 
T6, at point "C", to the 
ground lug at point "D". 

7. Install the 50-kHz 
parallel-tuned circuit 
(10-mH miniature molded 
choke in parallel with a 
1000-pF mica capacitor) in 
series with a 0.01-uF 
500-volt disc coupling ca- 
pacitor from the mixer, V4, 
pEate, pin 7, to the ground 
lug (next to pin 9) below the 
power transformer at point 

tiTZft 

8. Turn on the set after 
visually confirming the cir- 
cuit wiring. Tune in a signal 
to zero beat and retune the 
i-f transformer, T6, for max- 
imum signal. 



Doubly-balanced 
Demodulator 

Finally, a very high- 
performance communica- 
tions doubly-balanced 
modulator is easily sub- 
stituted for the dual-diode 
detector. The TL442 was 
specifically designed for 
communications applica- 
tions by providing factory- 
preset null adjustments in- 
ternal to the integrated cir- 
cuit. Signal and LO bal- 
anced nulls are greater 
than 30 dB. In some of the 
R-4C receivers, the LO in- 
put to the first audio 
amplifier at the top of the 
volume potentiometer was 
about 100 millivolts com- 
pared with an audio com- 
ponent of just several 
millivolts. Fig. 4 shows a 
diagram of the Texas In- 
struments TL442 (old desig- 
nation SN76514) integrated 
circuit. Design features; 

1. factory-tuned null ad- 
justments for both signal 
and local oscillator; 

2. noise figure of approx- 



+I4V DC 

bus 



470 
OHMS 

— ^JV— 



TO PIN 2 
TL-442 



lOfiF 



rh 



Fig. 6. Decoupling circuit 
required when 3-termtnal 
regulator is not used. 

imately 6 dB; 

3. typical conversion gain 
of14dB; 

4. low standard-communi- 
cation circuit input/output 
impedances with virtually 
no reactive components at 
HF frequencies; and 

5. flat frequency response 
to 100 MHz, with tuning 
usable to 300 MHz; Cj n = 
3-5 pF and C G ut = 10 pF. 

UHF transistor chips are 
matched and the resistors 
are etch-trimmed in the 
manufacturing process to 
achieve balanced circuits. 
The IC actually consists of 
two cross-coupled dif- 
ferential amplifiers whose 
emitters are driven by a 
third differential amplifier, 
A constant-current source 
is connected to the bottom 



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FIL CHOKE: 
DC CHOKE: 
SWC CHOKE: 



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Many others aiso available. Write for free list or quote on any custom 



transforms r f choke, or saturable reactor. 




Peter W. Dahl Co 

4007 Fort Blvd. • El Paso, Texas 79930 
Telephone (915) 556-5365 or (915) 751-4856 



^D6 



r]taslt<E LtlaiQfc 



js* Reader Service — see page 195 



35 



Voltage 

Dc input 
Dc output 



Location 

Regulator input, pin 1 
Regulator output, pin 2 
and output bus 



Value before 

17 Vdc, 300 mVac 

15 Vdc, 42mVac 



Value after 

16 V dc, 200 mV ac 

12 Vdc, <1 mVac 



(third) differential am- 
plifier. This device works 
best with 200-300 mV local 
oscillator injection, and 
performs without signifi- 
cant overloading up to 
about 500 mV of i-f signal 
input. Hence, the signal 
handling characteristics of 
the TL442 are as good as or 
better than most vacuum- 
tube converters in current 
receiver designs. 

For example, a two-tone 
test with 20-kHz separation 
showed that the third-order 
intermodulation products 
20 kHz above the upper 
frequency signal (or 20 kHz 
below the lower frequency 
signal) were more than 75 
dB below the two-tone 
signal level. Since the tests 
were conducted at 6 MHz, 
the performance would be 
expected to be somewhat 
better at the 50-kHz i-f fre- 
quency. Normally, the dy- 
namic range of the audio 
detector is not too impor- 



Table 1, 

tant as long as distortion is 
reasonably low, but, when 
audio CW filters are used, 
dynamic range becomes 
important again. 

An excellent description 
of 'the TL442 is also 
available from Texas In- 
struments. 1 Cost of the 
doubly-balanced mixer is 
about $3.00, an excellent 
trade-off when you con- 
sider that no external tun- 
ing or bias components are 
required for this applica- 
tion. 

The application of the 
doubly-balanced demod- 
ulator to a receiver is 
shown in Fig. 5. When a 
3-terminal voltage regulator 
is not used, the decoupling 
circuit shown in Fig. 6 may 
be required. Therefore, the 
load on the last i-f trans- 
former is still maintained 
at about 4000 Ohms and 
the avc action is not af- 
fected. Normal i-f input to 
the IC with the avc "on" is 



12 V dc regulator 

LM340T-12 

Heat sink, Calectro CAT No. J4-866 

Hookup wire 

6/32 x 1/2 screw 

6/32 lock washer 

6/32 nut 

2.2-uF s non-polarized capacitor 

Note: for early R-4C receivers, 1 Amp 50 piv diode (not supplied) 

Third mixer 

10-mH choke 

0.01 *uF disc capacitor 

1000-pF silver rnica capacitor 

15QOhm resistor 

12" RG-174/Ucoax 

Doubly-balanced demodulator (product detector) 

TL442 

3 1 .0-uF, 25 V dc tantalum capacitors 

1000-Obm resistor 

470-pF disc capacitor 

Hookup wire 

Audio distortion correction 

(thanks to R, J. Sherwood, Ham Radio, Dec, 1977) 

0.0015-uF disc capacitor 

4700-Ohm resistor 

Cost: $15.00. Add 5% tax in Texas: 075, Shipping/handling: 0.60. 

Total . Mail check or money order to: Sartor i Associates, 

W5DA T PO Box 2085, Richardson TX 75080. 

Table 2. As many parts are bard to obtain, the author will 
supply parts as listed here. 



about 10 to 30 mV. The LO 
is connected to the 
50-Ohm IC input to reduce 
loading on the 50-kHz local 
oscillator. About 125 mV are 
available at the IC in- 
put. The procedures for in- 
stallation of the doubly- 
balanced demodulator are: 

1 + Mount the IC "dead- 
bug"-style (leads up with 
double-stick tape) on the 
chassis between the bfo 
transformer, T11, and the 
bfo tuning capacitor. An 
alternative mounting loca- 
tion is the back side of the 
bfo capacitor. Then simply 
wire in the leads to the 
printed circuit board. 

2. Connect bias pins 4 
and 12 together. 

3. Connect pin 6 to a 
ground point. Then wire all 
three of the bypass capac- 
itors from pins 4 and 12, 9, 
and 10 to the same ground 
point. The values of the 1 .0 
uF capacitors are not 
critical, but must bypass 
both audio and i-f signal 
components. Miniature 
ceramic or tantalum elec- 
trolytics with at least 10 V 
dc breakdown are ade- 
quate, Connect pin 2, the 
12-volt input, to the 14 Vdc 
bus line. 

4. To connect the LO in- 
put, first lift the 1000-Ohm 
product detector resistors 
(R60, R61) off the printed 
circuit board. Then, con- 
nect a wire from one of the 
C84/R60 or C83/R61 junc- 
tions to the LO input of the 
IC at pin 5. 

5. To connect the i-f in- 
put, lift the product detec- 
tor diodes (CR2, CR3) off 
the printed circuit board at 
the i-f input junction point. 
Connect a 470-pF decou- 
pling capacitor from this 
junction point to the IC i-f 
input, pin 11. 

6. Connect output, pin 
13, to the junction of old 
R60/R61 resistors. The 



result of the doubly- 
balanced demodulator ad- 
dition is cleaner audio over 
a much larger signal range, 
particularly in the avc 
"off" position, Further, the 
frequency tuning tolerance 
for SSB signals is wider. 
Audio output is increased 
about 5 dB as a by-product. 
The low output impedance 
of the integrated circuit 
makes the audio amplifier 
less susceptible to hum 
and other spurious pickup, 

Acknowledgements 

Assistance and sugges- 
tions in applying and 
evaluating the perfor- 
mance of these receiver 
improvements are grateful* 
ly accorded to Jack 
Whitaker W5HEZ, Rob 
Sherwood WBJ9JGP, and 
the several members of the 
Richardson Wireless Klub. 
I can supply a parts kit for 
these changes at a cost of 
$15.60 postage paid.B 

References 

1 + Balanced Mixer Application 
Notes, Section 6.6 of Linear 
and Interface Circuits Applica- 
tions Book, Linear Circuits Ap* 
plications Dept., Mall Station 
964, Texas Instruments, Inc., 
Dallas TX 75222, 

2. Ham Radio, March, 1977, 
"Drake R4C Modification for 
Improved Audio/ 1 G. R. Bailey 
WA3HLT. 

3. Ham Radio, December, 
1977, "Receiver Problems and 
Cures," R. J. Sherwood 
WB0JGP and G. B. Heideiman 

KoHHH. 

4. Ham Radio, December, 
1977, "Crystal Filter Con- 
verter/' H. J, Sartori W5DA. 

The audio improvement of- 
fered by reference 3 is most im- 
portant. However, in many 
receivers, parasitic oscillations 
occur in the several-hundred- 
Hertz range, and the addition of 
a 0.0015 uF capacitor across 
resistor R33 in the audio 
amplifier did not entirely 
eliminate them. To completely 
correct the phase error in the 
feedback circuit, eliminate an 
undesirable peak in the audio 
frequency response, and elim- 
inate the spurious oscillations, 
a 4700-Ohm resistor needs to 
be added In series with the 
0.0015 uF capacitor across re- 
sistor R83. 



36 



OFFER! 




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special model of this remarkable transceiver. 

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LIMITED EDITION 



FREE 



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with every 21 Ox Limited Edition 
Transceiver. This Model DMK 
provides for easy plug-in and 
removal of the 21 Ox for mobile 
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cable, reverse polarity 
protection, circuit breaker, and 
mounting hardware. 



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CWKIT 

with every AC Console, 
Provide VOX and Semi -break- In 
CW operation, An ideal addition 
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added: 

• Receiver Incremental 
Tuning (R-l.T.) 

• CW coverage on 1 
meters 

• Power increased to 
250 watts 

• Special front panel 
with commemorative 
gold name plate 

With over 16,000 Atlas 21 Ox/21 5x's 
in the field, the high performance 
and durable dependability of this 
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Outside Illinois: 1-800-631-5802 



37 



A Solution to the Home-Brew 

Housing Shortage 

building a box for your next project 



Custom configurations are no problem 



Weldon I. Hogie W0IHI 
615 E. 7th Street 
Northfield MN 55057 

One of the problems en- 
countered by the 
home-brew addict is how to 
package his latest project 
With a well-stocked junk 
box, he may find that the 
cabinet he prefers costs 
more than all the parts put 
into it. Also, even if cost is 
not a concern, the closest- 




Fig. 7. 



t*is' 



Xi^ 



} C 



r- 



size commercial cabinet 
may not have exactly the 
most desirable configura- 
tion. 

It is not too difficult to 
bend up your own simple 
cabinet with two U-shaped 
pieces (double clamshell 
rotated 90°) as shown in 
Fig, 1, but there is a limit 
to accessibility once 
everything is installed. If a 
printed circuit board is 
mounted above the inside 
of the bottom clamshell, 
for instance, the board 
must be removed or tilted 
away to get at the trace 
side, Also, unless heavy- 
duty bending equipment is 
available so that you can 
use quite thick material, 
rigidity leaves much to be 
desired. This article pro- 
poses a method of custom- 
building your own en- 
closure in any dimension 



a"- 



«t*-i $ n -i«i 



\^ 



"s^ 



3£ 



Z2^ 



or configuration desired. 
The main features are 
complete accessibility to 
the interior, excellent 
rigidity when the covers 
are removed, and reason- 
able cost. 

Let's Build One 

To use an example: Let's 
build an enclosure 3" high 
by 6" wide and 8" deep, 
suitable for an electronic 
counter, for instance. Ob- 
tain a 5- or 6-foot length of 
aluminum angle material 
which is 1/2" on a side and 
1/16" thick. This aluminum 
angle is generally avail- 
able in hardware or 
building supply stores in a 
display containing various 
types of aluminum rods, 
straps, tubes, angles, and 
decorative sheets. 




Fig. 2. 



Fig. 3. 



Cut two pieces, each 22" 
long. Scribe and cut four 
90° notches in one side of 
each of the 22" lengths, as 
shown in Fig, 2. Use a 
hacksaw to cut and a file 
to smooth up the notches. 
Now, carefully bend 90° at 
each notch so you end up 
with two identical rec- 
tangular pieces like the 
one shown in Fig. 3. These 
are the side rails. You can 
bend this material only 
once, so do it right the first 
time. You may want to 
practice on some short 
lengths of angle before 
starting on the 22" lengths. 

Cut two pieces of .06" 
aluminum sheet 3" by 6" 
for the front and back 
panels. [Or cut 3-1/16" by 
6" — see Note in the section 
"Cover It Up" below). 
You could use ,05" sheet, 
but r 06" is surprisingly 
more sturdy and not that 
much more difficult to 
work with. Fasten the 3" by 
6" plates to the side rails as 
shown in Fig. 4 and you 



38 



have a very sturdy enclo- 
sure ready for stuffing. 

The leftover lengths of 
aluminum angle can now 
be used to make mounting 
surfaces inside the 
enclosure by attaching to 
the side rails and front and 
back panels. By cutting off 
short 1/2" lengths of the 
angle material, handy little 
mounting angles can be 
made to help in fastening 
the mounting surfaces. 
When fastening to the 
rails, use 4/40 or 4/36 flat- 
head screws, countersunk, 
in order to retain the flat 
outer surfaces of the rails 
to help in fitting covers, 
(Handy hint! Obtain a 1/4" 
machinist's center drill 
used by metal lathe oper- 
ators. It will drill a no. 4 
clearance hole and 
countersink it in one 
operation. I always keep 
one handy on the bench, 
mounted in a handle, for 
quick deburring and 
countersinking.) 

Larger Enclosures 

Look for 3/4" by 1/16" or 
1" by 1/16" angle material. 
Larger enclosures can be 
fabricated using this wider 
stock, and good rigidity 
will still be maintained. 
The 3/4" by 1/8" angle 
should also be considered 
if an exceptionally strong 
enclosure is desired. While 
the 1/8" angle is too thick 
to notch and bend as with 
the 1/16", suitable lengths 
can be cut to 45° on each 
end and fastened together 
with 90° angle plates or 
brackets placed inside the 
rails as shown in Fig. 5. I 




Fig. 4, 




■"S £> A 



Wj 



a 



90" 

ANGLE 
PLATE 



30" 

ANGLE 
BRACKET 



B 



^y 



suppose, for very large 
enclosures, the rails could 
be welded up using steel 
angle material of suitable 
width and thickness. 

Sloping Front Panel 

By reducing the angle of 
one front notch and in- 
creasing the angle of the 
other, rails for a sloping 
front panel can be made. 
Caution! The rails will no 
longer be identical; you 
must make a right and a 
left rail. The dimensions 
and angle of notches can 
be determined mathemat- 
ically, but it is simpler to 
draw out the side profile of 
the proposed rail and take 
the dimensions and angles 
from the drawing as shown 
in Fig. 6, Don't forget that 
now you must make the 
front panel larger than the 
back panel, to cover the 
longer sloped distance at 
the front. 

Card Rack Enclosures 

By using the fabricated 
rectangles as front and 
back rails instead of side 
rails and supporting them 
with side panels as in Fig. 
7, an enclosure can be 
made with the top, bot- 
tom, front, and back ac- 
cessible. By hinging the 
front and back panels, you 
have access to remove 
cards from the front and to 
service socket bus lines 
from the back of the 
enclosure, Piano hinges, 
which are available in dif- 
ferent lengths, can be cut 
to size and are very sturdy. 
An enclosure for an S-100 
bus system could be made 
up using a hinged top 
cover. 




ANGLE OF 
TOP NOTCH 



ANCLE OF 

BOTTOM 

NOTCH 



Fig. 6. 




By now you can see the 
possibilities are virtually 
unlimited. 

Cover It Up 

A simple way to make a 
cover for the 3" x 6" x 8" 
enclosure described earlier 
would be to first make a 
bottom cover. Make sure 
this bottom plate is flush 
all the way around and 
fasten it to the rails with 
tapped or self-tapping 
screws pushed through 
rubber mounting feet. Or 
you can fasten the plate 
normally and use the self- 
stick feet that are 
available. Note; // you 
make the front and back 
panels 1/16" higher than 
the 3" required, they can 
be offset down, when 
fastened, to cover the 
edges of the bottom plate 
when installed, to give a 
cleaner look. 

Bend up a clamshell to 
cover the top and sides as 
shown in Fig. 8. Don't be 
afraid of bending alum- 
inum or light steel if you 
don't have a metal brake. 
A 4-foot length of 1-1/2" 
steel angle obtained at a 
junk yard, cut in half and 
held in a bench vise, works 
fine, A plastic-tipped ham- 
mer helps to sharpen the 
bends without denting the 
material. (A regular ham- 
mer and a wood block will 
do the same.) If you should 
want a semi-rounded look, 
the side rails can be round- 
ed slightly with a file to 
soften the sharp edges. 
When bending wide sur- 
faces with your home- 
made brake, use the vise in 
the middle and C-clamps at 
the ends to hold the 




angle pieces together. 
When making bends too 
deep for the vise, use an 
angled C-clamp at one end 
and the vise at the other. 

If inadequate ventila- 
tion could be a problem, 
here is one approach. Drill 
holes in the bottom plate 
to let cool air enter. Make 
the clamshell cover about 
1/8" or so higher than 
needed and fasten it up on 
the side rails so there is a 
gap between the top of the 
front and back panels and 
the cover. Warm air can 
escape through these gaps 
Make the cover 3/4" longer 
than the rails and overlap 
1/4" at the rear and 1/2" at 
the front. The air gaps will 
not be noticed. Angle the 
edges of the cover at the 
front so it extends 1/2" at 
the top and is almost flush 
at the bottom. This gives it 
an attractive light-shield 
effect. 

Concerning ventilation, 
if you have hesitated to 
drill holes in covers 
because you can't do it 
cleanly, read on. First 
determine the size hole 
and the spacing between 
holes which look attrac- 
tive to you. Drilling out 
small scrap pieces of 
material on a trial basis 
might help you to decide. 
Carefully measure and 
draw out on the cover a 
grid of squares to locate 
the holes. Start from the 
center and work out so 
symmetry is retained. Use 
a center punch to make a 



Qn 0- 




Fig, 5, 



Fig. 7. 



Fig .ft 



Fig, 9. 



39 



mark at the intersection of 
the squares of the grid. Use 
a small drill bit, 1/16" or 
so, to drill a pilot hole at 
each punch mark. The care 
with which you mark and 
drill the pilot holes deter- 
mines the professional ap- 
pearance of the end result. 
Drill out the pilot holes 
with a drill the next size 
smaller than the drill you 
selected for the final hole 
size, then drill to final hole 
size. Keep this last drill 
handy, Sand down the 
burrs on the holes using 
the sturdiest sanding 
material you can find. The 
cloth-backed sanding belts 
from a small belt sander 
are perfect. Use a wood 
block to back up the sand- 
ing material. As the burrs 
are sanded down, push the 
drill bit through the holes 
to clean out the residue 
and sand some more. 
When the burrs are gone, 
use a finer grade of sand- 
ing material until the sur- 
face is smooth. Always use 



a backing block when 
sanding or the holes will be 
dished out. Keep pushing 
the drill through as you 
proceed to clean out the 
holes. You will end up with 
holes with perfectly clean 
edges, looking as though 
they were punched out 

A final word on covers: A 
double clamshell is a little 
more difficult to fit, but, 
as shown in Fig, 9, it may be 
more commercial look- 
ing. A piece of angle or 
strap material is fastened 
in the middle of the rail as 
shown and the two halves 
fastened to this when 
assembled. The popular 
bail-type handle also can 
be attached at the point of 
balance, if desired. 

Dress It Up 

Consider the use of a 
false front panel or escutclv 
eon. When you mount the 
regular front plate to the 
side rails, use countersunk 
flat-head screws. If any 
other mountings or parti- 



tions are fastened to the 
front plate, countersink 
these also. A false-front 
panel will now cover up all 
the screw heads. This 
panel can be made of 
very thin material, painted 
attractively, or covered 
with one of the many self- 
stick vinyl products now 
available, such as wood 
grain. You may want to use 
the old trick of etching 
aluminum in a lye and 
water solution to produce 
a soft, satiny look. Use rub- 
on lettering for a profes- 
sional appearance. If there 
are not enough switches or 
controls to hold the false 
front in place, use double 
sticky tape or dabs of sili- 
cone sealer (RTV). 

If you are photograph- 
ically inclined, you could 
draw up the panel, letter it, 
and photograph it. The let- 
tering could be rub-on let- 
ters, carefully printed 
hand-lettering, or the prod- 
uct of a LeRoy lettering set 
or a Selectric typewriter. 



Make a print the proper 
size and fasten it to the 
false front with rubber 
cement. If your drawing is 
made on a black surface 
with white lettering, the 
print can be purposely 
underexposed to a medium 
grey and then toned to 
almost any color. (Ask at a 
photo store for toner of the 
color desired.) Spray lac- 
quer applied to the print 
will keep it protected and 
looking new. 

Several years ago I built 
my own electronic counter 
and used this type of 
enclosure. Since then 1 
have made many changes 
and additions to the 
counter in order to keep 
up with the state of the art, 
and it has been a real 
pleasure to work on it. I 
can poke into it from all 
angles and add or remove 
boards at will. I can highly 
recommend that you try 
this method of enclosure 
construction for your next 
project. ■ 





The 

In the Northwest ! 

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2m FM Transceiver 




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Other locations: (Waik-in customers only) • Bellevue— 12001 N.E. 12th • Everett— 4610 Evergreen Way • Open Mon, thru Sat. 



40 



SPECIAL 
OFFER! 








To mark this impressive accomplishment Atlas is producing a 
special model of this remarkable transceiver. 

ATLAS 2 1 Ox 

LIMITED EDITION 



FREE 



$55 



DELUXE PLUG-IN 
MOBILE MOUNT 

with every 21 Ox Limited Edition 
Transceiver. This Model DMK 
provides for easy plug-In and 
removal of the 21 Ox for mobile 
operation. Complete with DC 
cable, reverse polarity 
protection, circuit breaker, and 
mounting hardware. 



FREE $60 



VOX/SEMI-BREAK-IN 
CW KIT 

with every AC Console. 
Provide VOX and Semi -break- In 
CW operation. An Ideal addition 
for the home station. 



With these new features 
added: 

• Receiver Incremental 
TUning (R.I.T.) 

• CW coverage on 1 
meters 

• Power increased to 
250 watts 

• Special front panel 
with commemorative 
gold name plate 

With over 16,000 Atlas 21 Ox/ 21 5x s 
in the field, the high performance 
and durable dependability of this 
rig has been proven beyond 
question. 

Take advantage of this special offer 
now. Supply is limited! 



STILL AT 
THE SAME 
LOW PRICE 



OUR FINE REPUTATiON SPEAKS FOR ITSELF 



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41 



Alexander M. MacLean 
WA2SUT/NNNBZVB 
IS Indian Spring Trail 
Denviile NJ 07834 



How Do You Use ICs? 

- part XI 



Battery power amps 



The article on linear pre- 
amps probably left a 
lot of battery-power freaks 
with their tongues hanging 
out It bothered me, too, 
There was a nice simple 
way to get the preamps to 
work below nine volts with 
good margin, but only one 
power amplifier would go 
as low as nine volts — the 
LM380CN mini-DIP — and 
it was going to be critical at 
that. 

There had to be a way; 
there's too much of a gap 
there. A little more digging 
in the linear book came up 
with a real humdinger. 
I think you are going to 




like the LM386 + It has a 
rated output of about 500 
mW — which may not seem 
like much, considering 

what I said about the 
LM38QCISL It, too, is in a 
mini-DIP package, but 
there are a few things that 
this one does that really 
make a difference. To start 
with, the IC works over a 
range of 4-12 volts. That 
takes care of your nine-volt 
battery just fine, and it 
can't be matched at all by 
the LM38GCN or its big 
brother, and more than 
makes up for the slight out- 
put. 

Even this should not be 



gAlJW 



-IMPUT 



*fHPUT 



GMfl 



fi4tN 



BIP455 



Vj 



VquI 



Fig. t. LM386 low~voltage audio power amplifier. 




(5V* 



/TJ 



^ 



OS 



=tt]-« 



rh 



downgraded. The IC will 
handle a 4- to Ifr-Ohm 
speaker or set of phones, 
and, with phones, that 500 

mW will pierce your ears 
for you. 

There is, of course, one 
little drawback; there had 
to be. This is the maximum 
supply voltage. You can't 
exceed 15 volts source. 
This is rather close to the 
13.8 volts on which your 
car or truck is supposed to 
run. It is possible that a 
surge might exceed that 
much, or some trouble 
might result in more 
voltage than the device 
can handle. It would ap- 
pear a simple design prob- 
lem, however, to include a 
zener to limit the voltage 
swing or a regulator circuit 
to handle it. This would be 



needed only for mobile 
use or where there was 
some possibility of voltage 
surges which could cause 
trouble. I don't see it as a 
serious problem if you take 
basic precautions 

Fig. 1 shows the device 

and its pinout.' This looks 
a whole heap like all the 
other amplifier ICs, but 
there are some differences. 

Fig. 2 gives the hookup, 
another minimal-part cir- 
cuit, There were a few sub- 
tle differences noticed 
with this IC compared with 
the others. The 0.05-uF cap 
and the 10-Ohm resistor do 
the same job as with the 
others. They suppress a 
high-frequency oscillation 
which may come. The out- 
put cap value is not criti- 
cal The larger value passes 




9Q-£S0*iF 
I5V 



^ 



to 



?k o v^ 



m 



4-lfefl 






Fig. 2 t Basic LM386 audio amplifier circuit 



Fig. 3. LM386 high-gain circuit. 



42 



the low tones, and smaller 
value will cut them off, 
which is acceptable for 
communications use. The 
10k volume control is not a 
critical value, but there 
should be something there, 
even a fixed value. With 
some configurations, there 
will be instability without 
an input resistor. The pin 
seven bypass may help in 
some applications, but I 
did not notice any gain in 
circuit performance with 
or without it. 

Up to this point, we just 
about have a repeat of the 
LM380 series of amplifiers 
except for the voltage 
rating, but the LM386 has 
one more important trick 
up its sleeve. Notice that 
there are two pins labeled 
gain; pins one and eight. 
The circuit given here has a 
nominal gain of 20, which 
is about the same as the 
LM380 series. Using the 
gain pins can give you gain 
up to 200. The hookup is 
shown in Fig, 3. The 10-uF 
capacitor bypasses an in* 
ternal resistor which 
limited the gain. With the 
10 uF you get the full 200 
or so gain. With a resistor in 
series, you can set the gain 
where you want it. 

Fig. 4 shows that part of 
the circuit The 1,2k value 
was shown in the applica- 
tion notes as giving a gain 
of about 50. } By ear, a 
2200-Ohm resistor will give 
about the same gain as no 
RC network at all. The 
nearest variable you could 
use should be a 23k- or 
Sk-linear taper poten- 
tiometer. This would give 
you an adjustable gain op- 
tion to play with. Remem- 
ber that the pot gets 
hooked up backwards. To 
increase the gain, you 
decrease the resistance in 
the circuit 

Using this high-gain op- 
tion has its price, too. That 
1000 uF Vcc bypass is 
something new, I found 
that with this IC, a lot of 
supply bypassing is needed 
to avoid stray oscillation. 




IOjlF 



^e 



Fig, 4. 50-ga/n circuit 

This may be due to using 
the long power leads and 
test leads, but this is a high- 
gain IC. Even in the low- 
gain configuration, you 
may need this much supply 
bypassing as well as the in- 
put resistance. 

Once the circuit is tame, 
the results are worth the ef- 
fort; for sheer performance 
it is hard to beat. It com- 
bines in one package an ef- 
fective audio-power ampli- 
fier with the sensitivity of 
the audio preamps. The cir- 
cuit is simpler than the two 
separate stages would be 
and works just as well. 

There was a bit too much 
measuring with the audio 
preamps, so this time let's 
stick to how it sounds. The 
power amplifier part ac- 
tually sounds the same as 
the other power amplifiers, 
in its low-gain setup. It has 
a nice hefty output to your 
ear and should do any 
communications job easi- 
ly. The sensitivity of the 
stage at low gain is about 
the same, too. This, by it- 
self, is really quite sen- 
sitive. Using the mike, I was 
getting just about the same 
usable input to my ear as 
with the preamps and the 
high impedance phones of 
that test setup. When I 
went to the high-gain set- 
up, things really got to be 
interesting. Once the cir- 
cuit got tamed, it really 
took off in performance. 
That high-gain setup is real- 
ly sensitive. I had no prob- 
lem picking up background 
noise to my heart's con- 
tent, but a nearby sound 
would scramble my brains. 
That thing is loud. 

It has reinforced my feel- 
ing that there is little need 
for the separate preamp 
for most ham use. This one 




4 I * hMS 



ft* 






iiooo^r 



Fig. 5. Brute force bypass* 
ing for preamps or amps. 



BYPA55 

GAIN 

f 

I 

GAI* 
-INPUT 



, 




N -j 


z 


* 

13 V 


t 


Z\ 


i 


±0 J 


5 


r ' 5 


I 


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-Vsl*H2VJ 
v OuT 

G*D 

BOOTSTRAP 
* INPUT 



Fig. 6. LM388 1.5-Watt 

audio power amplifier. 



4-I2V0C 



5100 









m 



£ 



10* 



Hhi = 5i0fl %*h* 




ft? 



-^i — 



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ftl 



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Fig. 7. LM388 basic circuit 



IC can perform the func- 
tion—if needed at all — 
and much easier, by itself. 
It did bring up one serious 
hindsight view, however. 
When I did the preamp 
series, I used the bypass 
values on hand to tame the 
circuits. Beyond a certain 
point, they did not work 
They were fairly low values 
reflecting what the ap- 
plication notes showed, At 
that time, I did not have 
any 1000-uF capacitors on 
hand, It may be that some 
of those high-gain stages 
which I found to be too 
unstable can be tamed 
with brute force bypassing. 

Since the preamp cur- 
rent is slight, there is little 
chance of serious voltage 
drop, so you also can try 
adding a series resistor in 
the V s lead shown in Fig. 5. 
A value of 1k or 2 2k might 
be a good starting point. 
This might tame some of 
those wilder circuits for 
serious use. I still don't 
think you will need all that 
gain, but if you do, it might 
be worth a try. 

The LM366 appeared — 
by ear — to give the same 
functional sensitivity as 
the best of the preamp cir- 
cuits given. They were in 
the 40-dB class. A gain of 

200 is46dB 

There is one other IC in 

this family to watch for. 



the LM388, which is the big 
brother of the LM386. It is a 
1.5-Watt, 14-pin tC power 
amplifier (See Fig. 6. 2 ) It is 
slightly more complicated 
to put together. The basic 
hookup is shown in Fig, 7. 
Notice the two 510-Ohm 
resistors and the 10-uF 
bypass. The high-frequency 
bypass circuit uses the 
values given also for the 
LM380— 0.05 uF and 27 
Ohms. Unfortunately, I 
was not able to get this IC 
from my dealers. I h^ve 
never seen it or the LM386 
listed, so you will have to 
write and see. The LM386 is 
available from James Elec- 
tronics for $1.10. 

Ordinarily l do not like 
to show a circuit without 
having tested it, but the 
power amps have worked 
so well that I think it is safe 
to do so. It gives you the 
basic information about it, 




a J MtSH GAffi 




t*J VARIABLE GAIH 



Fig. 8 LM3BB gain contra/. 



43 






JT 



<> — t- 



»ooo^ 



BTMS5 




IK 



H 



OT 



m 



10-250 



0Of§ 



Fig, 9, LM388 toad returned to V s (gain 200). 



V|N 




■Ht— 



2 m 



m :ii»t,(enj 



Fig, 10. LM380 high-gain circuit (not recommended!). 



should they become avail- 
able. The 510-Ohrn resis- 
tors should be thought of 
as specific values in this 
case. They also are easily 
available from Jameco and 
other sources. The 10uF 
value also is common. 
This is the basic low-gain 



hookup-the same as the 
other, except for the 
power. I do not see a need 
for this for most purposes. 
If you are running on bat- 
teries, it means quite a bit 
more drain even at rest. 
This was a new IC, as of 
1975 when my manual was 




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printed, and there was lit- 
tle information included 
with it. I do not have the ex- 
act specs. It also has the 
high-gain configuration 
available with the addition 
of the capacitor between 
pins 2 and 6. There should 
be no reason why this 
should not be made vari- 
able as was the other. (See 
Fig. 8J 

There was one other cir- 
cuit shown which was dif- 
ferent from most present- 
ed. This was a high-gain cir- 
cuit, but the load was 
returned to the V s pin. (See 
Fig. 9.) I can't think of any 
reason why this should be a 
particularly desirable 
feature. It looks as if it 
might be possible for dc 
current to flow through the 
speaker winding, which 
might not be good for it. 
The manual did not say 
why this feature was in- 
cluded. My feeling would 
be to stay away from this 
circuit unless you know 
why you wanted it. 

These ICs seem to be 
two-up on the LM380 series 
of amplifiers. They are low 
voltage and can be made 
higher gain. There is a way 
shown to turn the LM3B0 
into a high-gain circuit. The 
specs say that, in theory, 
you can have gain up to 
300, but they say this is 
hard to do and still keep it 
stable The basic hookup is 
in Fig. 10* 3 Notice some ex- 
tra parts in the basic 
LM380 circuit The tip-off 
should be obvious. Those 
are one-percent resistors I 
don't like one-percent re- 
sistors. Fortunately, I did 
not have any to try. I used a 
pair of resistance substitu- 
tion boxes and clicked 
away. Very quickly, the cir- 
cuit's capability showed 
up. For experimental use or 
breadboardlng, it looks 
like a real bummer. 

Without the extras, it is 
quite sensitive, but with 
them, the hum gets worse. I 
would assume it is the test 
leads Even not counting 
the hum, however, the cir- 
cuit didn't add anything. 



There was no noticeable in- 
crease in usable gain when 
tried with the mike input 
hookup. In fact, the sen- 
sitivity seemed to go down, 
and that's not counting the 
times it went into oscilla- 
tion or just cut off. Even 
the addition of the big 
bypass capacitor did noth- 
ing to help. 

Another bad feature of 
this circuit is that as you 
apply positive feedback to 
try to boost the gain, you 
also draw more current 
with the IC. This is not the 
healthiest thing for an IC to 
do. I don't think I per- 
manently damaged any, 
but I wouldn't bet on it 
since some of them got hot 
to the touch, It is supposed 
to have built-in thermal 
shutdown, but why go ask- 
ing for troubles like that? 
Stay away from this one. 

I don't know why the cir- 
cuit did not appear to work 
with any range of values 
tried, but that should be an 
indication that it is not 
suited to the reliable 
breadboard category that 
this series is based upon. 
Still, we have added one 
more reliable IC to the bag 
of sol id-state tricks that are 
available: the LM386. It 
has its own strengths and 
weaknesses, but the bat- 
tery-power option and the 
extra sensitivity if you need 
it make it a strong choice 
when you are planning a 
circuit 

Among all the linear ICs 
given so far, you should 
have something that will fit 
the requirements for al- 
most any of the common 
audio amplifier uses. The 
tested circuits may not be 
the optimum achievable, 
but they should cut down 
on the amount of cut-and- 
try needed to get some- 
thing that works for you.B 

References 

1. Linear Integrated Circuits, 
National, February, 1975, pp. 
5-51 to 5-54. 

2. tbid. f p, 8-2. 

3. Linear Applications, Volume 
l t Radio Shack, February, 1973, 
Sec. AN 69-7, 



44 



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45 



Customize Your HT144B 

— some nifty mods 



Total enjoyment of 2m. 



L. Z. Sqjor W2KGV 

767 Lomas SL 

Port St, Lucie FL 33452 



Many hams have built 
the VHF Engineering 
2 meter HT144B kit, which 
has proven itself an ex- 
cellent handie-talkie. Here 
are modifications that will 



make it easier to service 
and use, therefore enlarg- 
ing your total enjoyment of 
2m FM Described will be 
how to: 

1, Modify for simplicity 
of crystal changing and 
repairs. 

2, Add a "drop-in" bat- 
tery charging facility. 

3, Provide for an exter- 
nal microphone and ear- 
phone. 





The HT144B open for inspection. 



4. Replace the antenna 
with a rubber ducky, 

5. Add a touchtone™ 
pad. 

Difficulty in changing 
crystals is probably the on- 
ly drawback of an other- 
wise well-designed handie- 
talkie, so I will start with 
that modification. First, 
disassemble your unit, re- 
moving the antenna, the 
printed circuit chassis, and 
the four standoff spacers, 
disconnecting any im- 
peding wires as you go. File 
down the sides of two of 
the spacers, as shown in 
Fig, 1. Mount these two 
spacers, orienting the filed 
surface outward, directly 
to the PC board's top two 
holes, using lock washers 
and some nail polish as ce- 
ment to hold the spacer 
securely. Mount the re- 
maining spacers in the 
other two holes of the 
chassis in the same man- 
ner. Now, future removal 
of the chassis to change 
the crystals will only re- 
quire removing the screws 
from the front of the case 



and sliding the chassis 
back, eliminating the 
twisting, clumsy maneuver 
previously required due to 
the interference of the 
threaded studs mounted 
on the side flange of the 
case front. Do not reassem- 
ble the unit as yet. 

Now let's get to the 
"drop-in'' battery charging 
feature. First, determine if 
you have at least a 
3/16-inch space between 
the bottom inside of the 
HT and your battery pack. 
If not, then obtain a bat- 
tery carrier that will allow 
you the space. Disassem- 
ble those parts of your unit 
still remaining that would 
interfere with unobstruct- 



CHA^rh 




FILED 
SURFAtt 



Fig. 1. How mounting studs 
are filed and oriented. 



46 



ed drilling of the case. Drill 
or punch out two %-inch 
holes as shown in Fig, 2, 
Next, fashion a piece of 
1/16~inch-thick insulating 
material to fit the entire 
bottom inside of the case. 
Place it in the bottom and 
scribe thereon the location 
and outline of the holes 
you just made. Drill a 
3/8-inch hole in the center 
of each scribed area. Se- 
cure this piece in place 
with cement or thin 
double-faced adhesive. 

Next, we modify the bat- 
tery holder For this, you 
can etch a piece of one- 
sided copperclad PC board 
in the pattern and dimen- 
sions of Fig. 3 or cut out the 
design from thin copper 
sheeting. 

Now, lightly "flow-tin" 
some solder onto the cop- 
per to provide better corro* 
sion resistance (silver 
plating would be nice, if 
you have the facility). Affix 
the PC board or strips to 
the battery holder with ce- 
ment or double-faced ad- 
hesive (to the side nearest 
to the snap connectors). 
Solder wire leads from the 
strips to the connectors, us- 
ing care not to defeat the 
snap action and, more so, 
not to melt the plastic of 
the battery holder. Since 
this plastic melts easily, a 
dish of cold water for dunk- 
ing immediately after 
soldering is a helpful 
precaution. 

You should now have a 
snug-fitting battery pack 
when the HT is reassenv 



BATTERY 



5EE FlG 3 



5/4" 
»«OLE5 




iNiULATcKG 
MATERIAL 



ttOTTOM OF case 



Fig. 2. "Drop-in" battery charging assembly detail. 



bled If not, a simple card- 
board shim between the 
battery pack and the cir- 
cuit board is called for. 
Looking at the bottom of 
the HT, you should be able 
to see the contact strip 
material through the holes 
on the insulating board, 
which will be insulating 
them from the case by a 
circular area at least 1/8 of 
an inch wide. Paint the posi- 
tive contact insulated area 
with red nail polish for 
identification. 

Since it will no longer be 
needed, the charging sock- 
et at the top of the HT is 
removed and the holes 
used for the external mike 
and earphone jacks and, as 
a bonus, for a small LED to 
indicate a power-"on" con- 
dition (see Fig. 4 for 
layout). The LED is espe- 
cially valuable, as the 
switch on the volume con- 
trol can easily come on 
without enough audio be 



PHONE 



MIKE JACK 




pySM TO tal« 

SWITCH 



ROW 
SOCKET 



ing present to warn you 
that the battery is draining. 
The LED drain is minimal 
Solder a "U "-shaped piece 
of solid #22 wire to the 
cathode of the LED and a 
330-Ohm resistor to the 
anode (see Fig. 4 for con- 
figuration). Solder the 
other end of the 
"U"-shaped wire to the 
metal frame of the channel 
switch in a position that 
will allow the LED to slide 
easily into the hole left by 
the battery charging jack 
holding screw Now, route 
the resistor up over and 
down toward the on/off 
switch and solder it to the 
proper contact so that, 
when the switch goes on, 
the LED will light. 

At this point, install the 
microphone and earphone 
jacks, using closed-circuit 
types. Use a miniature 
phone jack for the micro- 
phone and a subminiature 
one for the earphone. Use 
shielded wire for the con- 
nections, as shown in Fig 5 
Wiring it in the manner 
shown will enable you to 



C83 



m 




I/4" 




Fig. 3. Battery charging con- 
tact strip. 

use the internal speaker- 
mike as usual, but have the 
convenience of using an 
external microphone-ear- 
phone assembly if you wish 
(see photo). 

The Rubber Ducky 

The installation of the 
rubber ducky is simplicity 
itself. Most easily ob- 
tainable and priced right is 
the Radio Shack #20-178 
VHF. If you opt for this 
antenna, you can use 
either a subminiature 
phone jack or an old- 
fashioned pin jack. Be sure 
that the center contact of 
the jack is insulated from 
the case. Use shoulder 
washers if necessary. 

Now, dig into your junk 
box for an old 7- or 9-pin 
tube socket and cannibal- 
ize it for one of the pins. It 
should be one that will 
serve as a single-pin socket 
for a number 16 or 18 sol- 
id, tinned copper wire. This 
pin is then soldered to the 
proper contact of the 
antenna jack, A 2-inch 
length of the solid wire 
mentioned above is now in- 
serted into the pin. Slide a 
piece of insulating tubing 
about 1 Va inches long over 
the wire. The wire is routed 
straight down to the push- 
to-talk switch and then at 
right angles to the switch's 



TO TT AUDIO- 



m 



JlOOK 

(i 

jioOK 






era 



0?2 



Vado this 
capacitor 




C35 



fcr-SI- 



n 




EAftPHOtlE 



*JVJ| 



MICROPHONE 



Fig. 4. Antenna and microphone plus speaker jack Fig. 5. Original circuit of HT144B is in heavy lines; the 
assembly detail. modification is in light lines. 



47 



TO 

TT PAD 

AUDIO 



CB4 SITE 
NOT USED 




Ffg, 6. Touchtone connec- 
tion point showing resistor 
network positioning in C84 
position. 

antenna change-over con- 
tact. Solder it to the con- 
tact. This lead dress is im- 
portant to prevent feed- 
back. You now can avoid 
the chore of unsoldering 
the antenna connection 
every time the chassis is 
removed for crystal 
changes or repairs. See Fig. 
4 for details. 

The Touchtone Connection 

By using one of the slim 
touchtone pads # such as 
one made by Barber Corp,, 



the pad can be mounted on 
the outside of the HT 
without really adding to 
the bulk. If you cement the 
pad to the HT, you then 
need only one hole for the 
wires. Alternately, you can 
bolt it to the HT using 
small screws, but be 
careful that they do not in- 
trude upon the space 
available for the battery 
carrier. The audio from the 
pad will need to be at- 
tenuated by a resistor net- 
work of 100 and 100k 
Ohms. There is a tailor- 
made place for the net- 
work on the chassis in the 
place left vacant by the 
unused capacitor, C84 (see 
Figs. 5 and 6 for circuit and 
layout), 

Final Touches 

Before buttoning up 
your HT, make the hole 
used for the push-to-talk 
button into a slot by cut- 
ting away the material be- 
tween the hole and the 
edge. A nibbler does this 



more neatly than a hack- 
saw. In either case, smooth 
the edges, round them off 
slightly, and touch up the 
bright aluminum with flat 
black paint- You will now 
be able to remove the 
cover of the HT without 
needing to remove the 
push-button, which often 
becomes loose from fre- 
quent removals (see Fig. 4). 

As a final touch and to 
give a nicer feel to the HT, I 
applied an imitation 
leather material to the 
back of it, I did not slot 
the push-to-talk button 
hole in the material, but 
punched out the hole and 
cut a slit from the edge to 
the hole The stiffness of 
most materials will yield 
enough to permit passage 
of the button on removal 
or installation and yet 
maintain a closure at other 
times to give a neat ap- 
pearance. 

With the foregoing 
features installed on my 
HT, I use it in comfort 



every evening on the com- 
muter train by holding the 
HT on the windows)!!. With 
the external Plantronics 
headset which requires 
very low voice levels, there 
is no disturbance to fellow 
passengers, but it does gen- 
erate a great deal of in- 
terest among them. During 
the several transit delays 
due to weather, fire, and 
accidents, it was comfort- 
ing and useful to have the 
HT to advise the XYL of my 
homeward progress or lack 
of it, Autopatch or the 
good offices of fellow 
hams on the repeaters in 
the area provided the link 
In fact, the XYL monitors 
the repeater for the 20 
minutes prior to our usual 
arrival time, and, by drop- 
ping the right cue words in 
our QSOs, such as 'This is 
W2KGV mobile 2 on the 
ConRail at White Plains 
station," she knows when 
to leave for my station to 
pick me up. Very con* 
venient. ■ 



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48 



p^Readw Service— see page 795 




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49 



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Mark Forbes WB9PHM 
1009 Beech 
Normal IL 61761 



Ultra-Simple CMOS Logic Probe 



a single IC does it all 



Make sure your troubleshooting is on target 



When it comes to 
troubleshooting dig- 
ital IC projects, a logic 
probe is indispensable, 
and, with so many con- 
struction projects employ- 
ing digital technology, 
almost anyone can use 
one. Most commercial 
probes represent two prob- 
lems in the eyes of hams 
and hobbyists: Commercial 
probes cost from $25 up- 
ward; and a given probe 
generally works with only 
one type of logic (TTL or 



CMOS). This article de- 
scribes a design for a logic 
probe which meets all 
requirements for trouble- 
shooting digital circuits, 
and solves the two prob- 
lems mentioned. 

The circuit shown in the 
schematic (Fig. 1) is fairly 
simple. The gates are 
CMOS, which has several 
advantages in this applica- 
tion: 

1, CMOS gates have a 
very high input impedance 
and will not load the cir- 




This is a closer view of the probe showing the method oi 
using the tC as the component base. The capacitor lead is 

used for the probe tip. 



cuit being observed. 

2. CMOS may be pow- 
ered from 3 through 15 
volts, so that the probe 
may be used in both 
CMOS and TTL circuits 

3. The supply current for 
CMOS ICs is extremely 
small, so the probe may be 
powered parasitscally from 
the circuit under test- 
even from low-powered 
battery circuits. 

4. CMOS gates are easily 



o 



FRPBE 
TIP 







-' w 

it- * 



made into "one-shots" 
[which lengthen out pulses 
to make them visible). 

5. CMOS has self limit- 
ing current sourcing and 
sinking, which allows LEDs 
to be driven without the 
use of series resistors. 

The circuit is built using 
five inverters, a NOR gate, 
a resistor, three capacitors. 
and three LEDs. This con- 
figuration brings another 
advantage Motorola has 



: :hi 



6 




L0« 



03 



C2. 
OI 



if IM 



*>* ®^ 



; R 4 

- h IM 

m 









<£& 



* 



C3 



R5 



12 



l>» LL — ® ' 



Fig. 1, Single IC logic probe. 



50 



FROM 

MCI45TE 

PIMI 



{> 






FROM V 



^{> @hr 



Ki?!f > ^> @- 



PULSE 




NOTE UNUSUAL 
POWER CONNECTIONS 



F/g. 2. Using a 4050 for extra drive. 



produced a CMOS pack- 
age, appropriately called a 
HEX gate, which contains 4 
inverters, a NAND gate, 
and a NOR gate, which 
sells for about SO?. 1 

Operation 

The operation of the cir- 
cuit is as simple as the cir- 
cuit itself. If the probe tip 
is touched to an active 
high (or "1") signal, in- 
verter 3 turns on the high 
LED, while inverters 1 and 
2 keep the low LED off. 
When a low (logical "0") is 
identified by the probe tip, 
inverters 1 and 2 cause the 
low LED to turn on, and in- 
verter 3 keeps the high LED 
off. The two inverters on 
the low line are there for 
buffering purposes. 

When idle, the 1 meg re- 
sistors split the supply 
voltage, letting R5 pull the 
output to a high state. This 
charges up the capacitor, 
C3, which then applies a 
high to the NAND (being 
used as an inverter), which 
holds the inputs to the 
NOR and inverter 6 low. 
When a negative edge of a 
pulse occurs, it is slowed 
up by the R1-C2 time con- 
stant (since the capacitor 
voltage cannot change in- 
stantaneously), This 
lengthened pulse changes 
the NOR output to high. 
Again, the pulse is 
lengthened by the time 
constant of C3 and the 
pull-up resistor, R5. The in- 
put to the NAND slowly 
changes (compared to the 
input pulse!) from high to 
low. The gate characteris- 



tics cause more of a "snap- 
action" than the rise and 
fall of the capacitor 
voltage. This is further 
squared off by inverter 6. 
The high signal is fed back 
to the NOR, which brings 
the output low again (This 
is the "one-shot" effect.) 
When inverter 6 receives 
the lengthened pulse, it il- 
luminates the pufse LED 
for the duration of the 
pulse. 

CMOS can exhibit some 
memory action when the 
input is removed from a 
signal source and left 
floating. The diodes and 
pull-up and pull-down 
resistors eliminate this 
memory problem to ensure 
normal operation of the 
probe. The resistor values 
are fairly critical. With the 
values shown, the probe 
operates well from 09 
volts. At more than 9 volts, 
some leakage current will 
cause the high LED to light 
dimly. This is easily distin- 
guishable from a true high, 
however, and it will go out 
on a low. 

Construction 

If it is desired, a printed 
circuit board can be made. 
However, the author and 
several other builders 
found it easier to trim 
leads short and either 
solder or wire-wrap direct- 
ly to the IC This provides 
an extremely compact cir- 
cuit. 

The probe, when built as 
described above, can be 
mounted in about any- 
thing that is convenient 




Here are two different prototypes. Alt the components in 

the left-hand version are in the right-hand version, except 
for the 4050 at the bottom of the protoboard. Also, 
smaller LEDs were used. 



My model was mounted in 
the casing of a Bic 4-color 
pen. This provides extreme 
portability, with the 
pocket clip allowing the 
probe to be carried 
around. 



If desired, the LED out- 
puts could be used to pro- 
duce high and low tones, 
using 555s for an audio 
logic probe. 

I have two final con- 
struction notes. The 22-uF 




This is the final assembled version. A Bic 4-color pen was 
used as the case. The LEDs and power leads can be seen at 
the top, and the tip is probing an /C at the bottom. Prac- 
tically anything can be used as a case, such as a cigar tube 
or cylindrical plastic mailing tube. You could even leave it 
in the "rodent" form! 



51 



IC1 

D1-D3 

R1 

R2-R4 

R5 

C1 

C2 

C3 

LED1-LED3 



IC2 



Parts List 

Motorola MC 14572 CMOS integrated circuit 

Small signal diodes, 1N914 of similar 

68Gh% 1 /4~Watt 

1 meg %-Watt 

100k 'A -Watt 

2.2 uF tantalum (see text) 

.01 uF ceramic disc 

1 uF tantalum 

miniature LEDs— coJor reader's choice 

Optional 

4050 CMOS hex buffer (non-inverting) 



tantalum capacitor be- 
tween Vcc and ground is to 
provide additional filter- 



ing. This value is not too 
critical, and the circuit 
may work on a good power 



supply without it Also, 
while the LEDs are not too 
bright, they are sufficiently 
bright for normal work. For 
a few cents more and an 
additional IC package, a 
4050 CMOS hex buffer can 
be used, if desired, to pro- 
vide added drive, as shown 
in Fig. 2. For ultra-simplici- 
ty and small size, however, 
the single IC version is 
recommended 

Conclusion 

While a logic probe may 



be the most useful tool in a 
ham shack, commercial 
models can be fairly ex- 
pensive. This probe can be 
built even on a poor man's 
budget, and, for anyone 
working with digital cir- 
cuitry, a cheap logic probe 
is practically a must, ■ 

Reference 

1The MC 14572 is available 
from Graham Electronics, 133 
S. Pennsylvania St,, Indianap- 
olis St., Indianapolis IN 46204, 
and from other Motorola dis- 
tributors. 



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52 



is* ReatfQr Service—see page 195 



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DELUXE PLUG-IN 
MOBILE MOUNT 

with every 21 Ox Limited Edition 
Transceiver. This Model DMK 
provides for easy plug-in and 
removal of the 21 Ox for mobile 
operation. Complete with DC 
cable, reverse polarity 
protection, circuit breaker, and 
mounting hardware. 



FREE $60 



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CWKIT 

with every AC Console. 
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• Receiver Incremental 
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• CW coverage on 1 
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• Power Increased to 
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• Special front panel 
with commemorative 
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With over 16.000 Atlas 21Qx/215x's 
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53 



M 



"The Voice of Wolf Creek" 

-the KGCX story 



How to operate a radio station without a license. 



Dr . William C Hess W6CK 
PO Box 19M 
Pasadena CA 91102 



Beginning in 1924, the 

late }oe lacobs 7TF oper- 
ated an unlicensed broad- 
casting station on his ranch 
in the wilds of Montana. In 
late 1925, this station was 
moved to the tiny village of 
Vida, Montana, where its il- 
legal operation was con- 
tinued by the local banker, 
f . £, Krebsbach, The follow- 
ing transcript of a 1930 
speech given by Krebsbach 
to the Lions Club of nearby 
Wolf Point was recently 
presented by the Krebsbach 
family to their long-time 
friend, Dr. Hess, because of 
his abiding interest in the 
history of KGCX. It details 
the trials and tribulations in- 
volved in operating this 
clandestine radio station un- 
til it was licensed and the 
services of a licensed oper- 
ator were secured, —Ed. 

Five years ago, in 1925, 
when I returned to Wolf 
Point after undergoing sur- 



gery at the Mayo Clinic, 
some of the local radio en- 
thusiasts told me of hear- 
ing "The Voice of Cow 
Creek" on their radios. Of 
course, I knew at once that 
it must be the work of Joe 
Jacobs, eastern Montana's 
radio wizard. And it was, 

At that time, Joe had a 
license only for operating 
an amateur station, but he 
was going on the air with 
musical programs on a 
wavelength of over 200 
meters, which was strictly 
forbidden by the Depart- 
ment of Commerce, 

Being interested in see- 
ing a real broadcasting sta- 
tion which could transmit 
voices and music, I went 
down to the Jacobs Ranch 
as soon as the condition of 
the roads permitted. Joe 
had the transmitter sitting 
on a small table, and while 
it was not the neatest piece 
of construction I have ever 
seen, it did the work that 
any transmitter is capable 
of doing, and it did mighty 
well, as you all remember. 

Instead of using high- 
priced meters such as we 
are using now, which cost 
anywhere from twelve to 



twenty-five dollars each, 
he was using old discarded 
seventy-five cent voltme- 
ters. The panel was only 
two-feet square- 
He had a hand-held mi- 
crophone which had to be 
carried around the room to 
pick up organ music, pho- 
nograph, or whatever type 
of music they could get at 
their ranch home. The 
microphone had to be held 
up to the organ frame so 
the vibrations could be 
picked up; the same was 
the case with the phono- 
graph music. The mike had 
to be attached to the pho- 
nograph cabinet otherwise 
the volume of pickup 
would not be sufficient for 
broadcasts. 

We all got a great deal of 
pleasure out of it, and I 
suggested that I bring the 
Vida Syncopators Orches- 
tra down to the ranch and 
broadcast our music, Mr, 
lacobs suggested that the 
set be taken to Vida in- 
stead, as we had more 
room there to broadcast 
from the Community HalL 
So, it was not long be- 
fore Vida had a direct con- 
nection with the outside 



world — a pure and simple 
bootleg, wildcatting radio 
station. We operated 
Sunday afternoons only, 
and from the number of 
letters we received, we had 
a great many listeners to 
the foolishness we put out 
I believe that at first we 
tried to make ourselves as 
foolish as possible. 

In a very short time, Mr. 
Jacobs perfected what is 
known as the electrical 
phonograph pickup. Wheth- 
er it was an innovation on 
his part, I don't know (he 
used a headphone to make 
it), but I do know that it 
was the very first time pho- 
nograph music was broad- 
cast in the entire middle- 
west by the now-common 
electrical pickup process. 
Other stations at that time 
were broadcasting phono- 
graph music by the now en- 
tirely obsolete system of 
merely placing the micro- 
phone in front of their 
phonographs. With that 
system, the quality, of 
course, was not nearly as 
good as with the electrical 
pickup process. It was at 
least a year before other 
stations started using our 



54 



system. This is one thing in 

the broadcasting game in 
which we were absolutely 
the pioneers. 

We became so interest- 
ed in the novelty of broad- 
casting that we applied to 
the Department of Com- 
merce for a broadcast 
license for Vida — a town 
of twenty-five inhabitants. 
Of course, we assumed 
they would forget to look 
up the population of the 
fair city, We received a re- 
ply stating that a ban had 
been placed on all further 
radio station construction, 
and that the number of 
radio stations was to be 
reduced, not increased. 

Still, we kept on broad- 
casting, not knowing the 
penalty. The penalty for 
operating a radio station 
without a license was $500 
and six months in the coop. 
We did not know this, but 
did know that the practice 
was not exactly according 
to Hoyle, 

We started reaching out 
quite a distance with our 
broadcasts, and, finally, a 
bit too far, as we were 
heard at Froid, Montana. A 
certain gentleman there 
(this is not the term we ap- 
plied to him at that time), 
who did not approve of 
Vida having a radio station 
when Froid could not have 
one, immediately sent in a 
complaint to the radio in- 
spector at Seattle stating 
that an illegal broad- 
casting station was operat- 
ing at Vida under the name 
of "The Voice of Wolf 
Creek/' 

We had changed the 
title of the station to this 
appelation when we moved 
it to Vida, since Vida 
was near Wolf Creek. 
Naturally, the radio inspec- 
tor knew who to write to at 
Vida since we had submit- 
ted our application for a 
broadcast station to him. 
We knew that the appli- 
cant for a station had to be 
a reliable person or firm, so 
we had used the name of 
the bank where I was the 
cashier. So, the inspector 




This shows Mr, Krebsbach operating the original KCCX transmitter at Vida, Montana, in 
1926. Note the crank of a hand-wound phonograph at the left edge of the picture. 



wrote a letter at once to 
the First State Bank at 
Vida, asking the name of 
the owner and operator of 
the station at Vida — not 
licensed by the govern- 
ment—so that he could 
commence prosecution at 
once. 

All was not so good 
around Vida (especially in 
the bank) for a week or 
twof Paul (my brother) 
would come in every now 
and then, saying, "I told you 
so" and "now don't get me 
into it" — all nice, cheery 
remarks, you know. The 
final outcome was that Mr, 
Jacobs lost his amateur 
license, and nothing fur- 
ther was done, 

I asked a number of my 
friends in the surrounding 
towns to write to the in- 
spector telling him that Joe 
was brokenhearted and 
felt terrible over the abrupt 
ending of his chosen 
career. About two weeks 
later, Joe received a letter 
from the Department of 
Commerce asking whether 
he wished to be reinstated 




This is a picture of Mr. Krebsbach in the 1950s, at the 
KCCX microphone. 



55 



— and Joe was soon re- 
stored to the status of be- 
ing a full-fledged amateur 
operator, but he refused to 
have any further connec- 
tion with the bootleg radio 
station. 

Naturally, we thought 
that that was the end of our 
broadcasting career, as we 
surely now had a black 
mark with the Department 
of Commerce about a foot 
wide. In the meantime, I 
got in touch with Mr, 
Wiilson of the Fobes Radio 
Supply, at Butte. Mr. 
Wiilson happened to be a 
close friend of Mr. 
Redfern, who was the 
supervisor of this 7th Radio 
District. I don't know what 
Mr. Wiilson did, but I do 
know that he was in- 
strumental in getting our 
first license with the call 
letters KGCX. We started 
unlicensed broadcasting at 
Vida on October 1, 1925, 
and received our license at 
Vida on October 6, 1926. 

At first, we started on a 
one-day schedule per 
week, broadcasting only 
on Sunday afternoons, as 
we had done without a 
license. However, now that 
we were a legitimate sta- 
tion, we increased the 
broadcasting schedule to 
Monday, Wednesday, and 
Saturday during the noon 
hour, and very shortly went 
on a daily schedule from 
12:15 to 1:15 pm. 

To show you how much 
nerve we had (that is not 
the exact word, but will 
do), we did not have a resi- 
dent licensed operator as 
required by the govern- 
ment. Since we badly need- 
ed someone with a First 
Class radio operator's 
license, we decided to go 
to Butte on the day the 
assistant radio inspector 
was scheduled to be there 
giving radio examinations, 
so that Joe could take the 
First Class operator's exam 

On the designated morn- 
ing, we walked over from 
our hotel to the Post Office 
building where the exami- 
nation was to be held )oe 



sat down, waiting for the 
test to start, and I went 
back to our hotel, about as 
nervous as I have been 
here with this station at 
times. I phoned Mr. Will- 
son and told him Joe had 
started the examination 
"Well," he said, "if he is 
not back at the hotel in an 
hour, he will have passed 
his code test and then 
everything will be hotsy 
totsy." 

I sat in the lobby of the 
hotel with my back to the 
door and watched the 
clock. For the first fifteen 
minutes, 1 was slightly ner- 
vous, and before the hour 
had expired, 1 was a ner- 
vous wreck. Each time the 
door to the lobby opened, I 
would think it was Joe 
coming back. The hour 
passed and Joe did not 
come; another hour passed 
and finally it was lunch 
time. I asked Mr. Wiilson to 
lunch, and we both went 
up to see Joe. He said he 
had failed the first two 
code tests, but that Mr, 
Clark, the examiner, was 
very nice to him and al- 
lowed him a third try at the 
code test, which he passed. 

I thought that that was 
all there was to it, as surely 
Joe could not fail the 
technical part of the exam- 
ination. In those exami- 
nations, you are required 
to know the construction 
of a ship transmitter, a land 
transmitter, and the con- 
struction and maintenance 
of storage batteries. You 
must be able to draw a 
complete diagram of a 
transmitter, and you must 
know ten of the radio laws. 
You must know what the 
source of the trouble is 
when a milliammeter, volt- 
meter, radio-frequency am- 
meter, or other meters fail 
to respond. And this is 
about half of the work in 
the examination, which or- 
dinarily takes a full day to 
complete, 

Joe finished his examina- 
tion at 3 o'clock, and we 
went to a movie to relieve 
the strain. We were both 



happy, to say the least. We 
had finally conquered! 

We stopped at a nearby 
drugstore, and phoned the 
radio inspector and asked 
for results. Joe had flunked 
by a mere three points. It 
was just a small matter of 
forgetting to connect the 
motor generator to the 
transmitter, in the diagram 
which Joe had drawn. 

Right there and then, all 
of the joy went out of our 
lives completely. We were 
homesick, sick at heart, and 
what not We went back to 
our hotel room, and ]oe 
paced the floor on one side 
of the room and I on the 
other side. We phoned Mr. 
Wiilson and he asked us to 
come down to his office, 
which we did, and he asked 
us out to his home for din- 
ner. On the way out, I re- 
marked with a good-sized 
lump in my throat, "Well, 
that's the end of KGCX " 

Mr. Wiilson said, 

"Why?" 

"Well/' I said, "I can't 

operate the station any 
longer without a licensed 
operator and risk being 
caught— 111 be fined $500 
and spend six months in the 
hoosegow." 

He said the $500 fine and 
six months in jail did not 
apply to operating a sta- 
tion without having a 
licensed operator, but 
rather to operating a sta- 
tion without a license, 

He also said that the 
penalty for operating 
without a licensed oper- 
ator was merely revocation 
of the station license, and 
that if you quit broad- 
casting now, you will have 
to surrender your KGCX 
station license, and then 
you will be through as far 
as getting another station 
license at Vida is con- 
cerned 

He further said that if 
you continue broadcasting 
without a licensed opera- 
tor and get caught, the 
worst that can happen is 
that your station license 
will be revoked, and even if 
that happens you won't be 



any worse off than if you 
quit now. 

He continued, "but if 
you continue broadcast- 
ing, Joe can take the 
operator's examination 
again in three months and 
will surely pass then/' 

Right at this point is 
where Wolf Point nearly 
never would have had a 
broadcasting station as, if 
we had followed our dic- 
tates and stopped broad- 
casting then at Vida, Wolf 
Point would not have a 
radio station today The 
much* cove ted license 
would have been gone for- 
ever. 

We returned to Wolf 
Point, and it was pitiful to 
see Joe so nervous and 
disappointed over his 
failure. I should say at this 
point, that there is absolute- 
ly no disgrace in one's in- 
ability to pass the First 
Class operator's examina- 
tion on the first attempt. I 
know that I would not at- 
tempt to take it at this time. 

We continued to op- 
erate the Vida station, and 
everything went smoothly 
until the following June 
when we received word on 
a Friday evening that the 
radio inspector would ar- 
rive at Wolf Point on the 
following Monday morning 
to inspect KGCX at Vida. 

The first thing to do was 
to hotfoot it to Wolf Point 
and get in touch with Mr. 
Johnson, at Havre, who 
was the holder of a First 
Class operator's license. 
He agreed to come to Wolf 
Point on the Sunday morn- 
ing train, but he did not 
show up. I wired him, and 
he phoned back advising 
that he had missed the 
train, but that he would 
come on Number 4, that 
evening, for sure. 

He did, and we spent all 
night rehearsing the man- 
ner of operation of our 
transmitter, its construc- 
tion, our broadcasting 
schedules, etc., so that he 
would be fully informed 
and be able to deceive the 
radio inspector into think- 



56 



ing that he, Johnson, was 
actually the licensed oper- 
ator of KGCX. Actually, 
Johnson had only been at 
Vida on one other occa- 
sion, when he visited there 
briefly just to satisfy his 
curiosity about our trans- 
mitter. As you know, there 
was only one other radio 
station in the whole state 
of Montana at that time, 
besides ours. 

Next morning, Mr Clark, 
the assistant radio inspec- 
tor, was to arrive from 
Seattle. I had arranged that 
Mr, Johnson would be 
taken to Vida that morning 
on the first ferry crossing 
over the Missouri River. I 
had also arranged to have 
Joe Jacobs on hand early in 
the morning at Vida, so 
that he could give Johnson 
a final "brush-up" on our 
transmitter, so that we 
would be sure to deceive 
Mr. Clark about Johnson 
being our licensed opera- 
tor. 

Naturally, Johnson knew 
very little about our trans- 
mitter, having seen it only 
once before. My brother, 
Paul, was in a terrible 
sweat, and later told me 
this was quite sufficient for 
him, and that he did not 
want to be "in" on any 
radio station venture of 
mine, ever, 

Mr. Clark arrived on 
Number 2, Monday morn- 
ing as scheduled, and I 
stalled around Wolf Point 
as long as I could in order 
to give Joe as much time as 
possible to "clue in" 
Johnson about our station 
at Vida. 

During the trip to Vida, I 
was preparing Mr. Clark for 
the shock he might get 
when he first viewed our 
transmitter at Vida, as it 
was just a cheaply assem- 
bled set. To all this, he said, 
"Well, don't worry about 
how the set looks as long as 
your broadcasts go out all 
right/' 

When we reached Vida, 
Joe Jacobs was sitting 
leisurely on the front steps 
of the bank, apparently un- 



concerned about the ap- 
proaching dignitary from 
Seattle, 

In the event that the 
radio inspector might hap- 
pen to go into the village 
general store and Post Of- 
fice, for any reason, and to 
help give the impression 
that Johnson was indeed a 
resident of Vida, who 
worked at the store when 
he was not on duty as the 
licensed operator of KCCX, 
a bit of flummery was ar- 
ranged. So, when we ar- 
rived at Vida, Johnson was 
already in back of the 
counter at the store with 
his coat off, busily selling 
butter and eggs, and posing 
as a clerk in a store which 
he had just entered for the 
first time in his life. Ob- 
viously, the storekeeper 
was a part of the con- 
spiracy to deceive the 
Department of Commerce, 
since he wanted Vida to be 
able to keep the radio sta- 
tion, as did everyone in the 
surrounding community. 

Joe stepped into the 
bank with Mr, Clark and 
started his First Class 
operator's examination. I 




Marcel las Jacobs poses to give prospective customers an 
indication of the size of the Jacobs wind electric plant. 



went over to the store and 
asked Johnson to come 
over to the bank. During 
joe's examination, Mr. 
Clark inspected everything 
about our transmitter, the 
antenna system, etc., and 



asked Johnson to turn on 
the transmitter and trans- 
mit a phonograph record 
This came through nicely, 
and the inspector then 
asked for an announce- 
ment through the micro- 




Shown parked alongside the Vida bank is this unorthodox vehicle built by Joe Jacobs, Its 
airplane motor would whiz it over the prairies at 40 mph. In winter f it was equipped with 
skis. Note the antenna insulators and ground system of KCCX at the left. Seated in the 
vehicle is young Clair Krebsbach, now General Manager of 50-kW KERR. 



57 




Montana Pete performed tor years on KCCX. When he departed for greener pastures, 
KCCX held a farewell party for him in the form of a barn dance, with live coverage of the 
affair provided by the station. Mr. Krebsbach, acting as master of ceremonies, intended to 
say into the mike, "We shall certainly miss Pete." Unfortunately, he transposed the first 
letters of the last two words* His profuse apologies to the hundreds of KCCX listeners, 
and to those present at the party, only made the situation worse. 



phone. Johnson talked into 
the mike, but the inspector, 
who was listening on a 
radio in another room, said 
nothing came through We 
were then using a desk- 
stand telephone as a micro- 
phone. Jacobs looked up 
from his exam papers and 
saw the telephone receiver 
hanging on the hook (which 
short-circuited the mike), 
and quietly told J ohnson to 
take the receiver off the 
hook, which brought a 
faint smile to the face of 
Mr Clark. 

At dinner that evening in 
our living quarters in the 
bank, with Mr. Clark as a 
dinner guest, my young son 
had to help things along by 
telling his mother, "Mama, 
Mr. Johnson is here again, 
isn't her 

It may be that Mr Clark 
sensed that something was, 
indeed, amiss, but he said 
nothing. In any event, he 
was very nice to us, and J oe 
had passed his examina- 
tion and all was well 

I was startled again at 
the ferry when we were re- 
turning to Wolf Point. 



Johnson, of course, had to 
return to Havre, Mr, Clark 
was going east. As I was 
starting home, Mr. Clark 
bid me goodbye and on 
came Johnson to also bid 
me goodbye. Rather 
strange for my operator to 
bid me goodbye. 

I am sure that because 
of the remark my young 
son had made, and be- 
cause Johnson bid me 
goodbye, there was little 
doubt in the mind of Mr, 
Clark that I had been op- 
erating KCCX without the 
services of a licensed 
operator. However, he said 
nothing. 

We operated KCCX at 
Vida until February 1,1929 
At that time, I took over 
the Westland Oil Company 
agency at Wolf Point I 
thought it would be very 
nice if we could continue 
operating a radio station in 
this area, so I applied to 
the Federal Radio Commis- 
sion for permission to 
transfer the Vida station to 
Wolf Point, They replied 
that they would approve 
the transfer, but that they 



would not allow us to use 
the small 7Va-Watt trans- 
mitter we had used at Vida, 
They told us we must use 
either 100 Watts or 250 
Watts up to sunset, and 1 00 
Watts after sunset. We first 
planned on 100 Watts, but 
Mr. Hooper, of Regina, in- 
formed us that a 250-Watt 
set would cost but little 
more, so we made applica- 
tion for that power, 

We had no knowledge 
whatsoever as to what in- 
formation we should put in 
the application relative to 
the rating of the tubes, the 
type of transmitter, and 
other such items, and this 
necessitated a trip to 
Regina to get the required 
information from Mr. 
Hooper, who was chief 
engineer of radio station 
CKCK, up there in Regina, 
Canada, about 175 miles 
north of Wolf Point. We 
made the trip via airplane, 
as the roads were impassi- 
ble, and after going 
through some hair-raising 
experiences on the trip 
(two forced landings with a 
dead motor), we brought 



the necessary information 
back to Wolf Point and 
submitted our application 
to the Government, 

We thought that we would 
have our construction per- 
mit in two or three weeks, 
but six weeks went by with 
no word from the Commis- 
sion. I telegraphed Senator 
Walsh and Congressman 
leavitt in Washington, and 
within twelve hours I had a 
telegram from Mr. Leavitt 
advising me that the permit 
had just been granted and 
that we were assured a 
250-Watt station in Wolf 
Point ■ 

Author's note: The foregoing 
speech was never given a title 
by Mr. Krebsbach. If occurs to 
me that the name of a popular 
magazine would be an apt and 
accurate title for the subject 
speech, viz: True Confessions. 

The village of Oberammer- 
gau t in Germany, is famous for 
its Passion Play, and the town 
of Hemel is well known in 
California for its annual out- 
door Ramona Pageant, but for 
sheer audacity and raw cour- 
age on the part of its actors, the 
tableau just described, which 
was presented at Vida by Mr, 
Krebsbach. First Class Oper- 
ator Johnson, the village 
storekeeper, et al, in attempt- 
ing to deceive the Department 
of Commerce of the United 
States government, has no 
equal. 

Joe Jacobs and his brother, 
Marcellus, did a great deal of 
experimenting with wind 
chargers on their ranch. Later, 
they established a large factory 
in Minneapolis and were able, 
through their 260 dealers, to 
sell twenty million dollars 
worth of wind chargers to 
farmers, airports and railroads 
throughout the world, an im- 
pressive accomplishment all 
stemming from the electrical 
tinkering of two young men on 
a Montana ranch. 

Joe Jacobs passed away in 
1962. In 1933. Marcellus in- 
vented the cathodic pipeline 
device which has saved pipe* 
line companies millions of 
dollars. He still carries on elec- 
trical experiments in a large 
laboratory near Fort Myers , 
Florida, where another elec^ 
trical tinkerer, Thomas A. 
Edison, developed many of his 
patents. 



58 




DELUXE PLUG-IN MOBILE MOUNT 

with every 21 Ox Limited Edition Transceiver. This 
Model DMK provides for easy plug-in and removal of 
the 21 Ox for mobile operation. Complete with DC 
cable, reverse polarity protection, circuit breaker, 
and mounting hardware. 



SPECIAL 

OFFER! 

$60 

VOX/SEMI-BREAK-IN CW KIT 

with every AC Console. Provide VOX and Semi- 
break-in CW operation. An ideal addition for the 
home station. 





To mark this impressive accomplishment Atlas is producing a 

special model of this remarkable transceiver. 



ATLAS 2 1 Ox 

LIMITED EDITION 



With these new features added: 

• Receiver Incremental Tuning (R.I.T.) 

• CW coverage on 1 meters 

• Power Increased to 250 watts 

• Special front panel with commemorative 
gold name plate 



With over 16,000 Atlas 21 Ox/21 Sx's in the field, the high 
performance and durable dependability of this rig has 
been proven beyond question. 

Take advantage of this special offer now. Supply is 
limited! 



STILL AT THE 
SAME LOW PRICE 




ELECTRONICS INTERNATIONAL 



v*E«3 



11305 ELKIN STREET, WH EATON, MD. 20902 

TEL 301-946-1088 



Serving the Washington, D.C. area for 15 years 



59 



CB to 10 

part XIX: Lafayette SSB rigs 



They work like champs. 



Fred H. Gerken WBiLLP/S 
7009 Knight 
Lewisviiie TX 75056 



Recently, due to the ex- 
tinction of 23-channel 
CB radios, several ama- 
teurs have converted SSB 
CB rigs to ten meters with 
great success. The fun of 
QRP operating, and the 



band openings lately, have 
contributed to their pres- 
ent popularity. The follow- 
ing information is a basic 

description of how to con- 
vert two of Lafayette's 
23-channel SSB radios to 



ten. 

The first step in any con- 
version is to decide on a 
frequency scheme. Since 
most SSB activity on ten 
seems to be around 28.6 
MHz, and since the phone 




fig. 7. Xtal-plexer. 



— *2G3 i 



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a 



-75pF 



Rzoe 



i 



0*05 



m 



iw^ 



-■ " J * '•» 



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GRECN 



Fig, 2. 



w- 



taoi 



L20I 



— M05 

ttHl 

m 



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m 



ftt 




0202 




Fig. 3. 



m 



GZ03 



:! 




r 
t 



m 



m 



band begins at 28.5 MHz, I 
used the frequency/chan- 
nel scheme shown in Table 
1. 

In order to produce the 
frequencies shown in Table 
1, new xtals must be pur- 
chased and substituted for 
xtals x-205 through x-210. 
Table 2 shows the new 
xtals that must be in- 
stalled, 

The new xtals can be of 
the third-overtone type, 
which is less expensive 
than a fundamental type. 
Note that any one xtal will 
give you four channels, so 
if you need only 40 kHz of 
the band, only one xtal 
needs to be installed. 

Installing the New Xtals 

First, remove the old 
xtals directly behind the 
channel selector. I recom- 
mend the use of a solder 
wick, as the circuit board is 
very easily ruined by ex- 
cessive heat Next, install 
the new xtals in the proper 
locations. Note that the 
xtals are not in order. 
Locate C203, an 86-pF 
capacitor, remove it and in 
its place put a 68-pF mica 
capacitor. Locate C220, a 
15-pF capacitor, remove it 
and in its place put a 10-pF 
mica capacitor, {See Fig. 1 .) 

Tuning Up the Xtal-plexer 

Place the channel selec- 
tor to channel 1. This 
switches x-205 and x-201 in- 
to the xtal-p lexer's circuits. 
If x-205 is a 24.865 MHz 
xtal as specified, then tune 
L201 to resonance at that 
frequency Measure the 
frequency and signal am- 
plitude at the gate of Q207. 
Note that a 14.910 MHz 
signal is also present at the 
gate of Q207. If the 14.910 
MHz signal prevents you 
from tuning the 24.865 
MHz stage, then ground 
the source end of C219 (10 
pF). Once L201 is tuned, 
begin tuning L202. (Re- 
move the ground from 
C219 if you grounded it in 
the previous step.) The 
L202 stage should tune to 
resonance near 39.775 



Channel 


Frequency 


1 


28.500 MHz 


2 


28.510 


3 


28.520 


4 


28.540 


5 


28.550 


6 


28.560 


7 


28.570 


8 


28.590 


9 


28.600 


10 


28.610 


11 


28.620 


12 


28.640 


13 


28.650 


14 


28.660 


15 


28.670 


16 


28.690 


17 


28.700 


18 


28.710 


19 


28.720 


20 


28.750 


21 


28.760 


22 


28.770 


23 


28.800 



Table 7. 

MHz Measure frequency 
and signal amplitude at the 
collector of Q202 Next 
tune coil 1203 for peak out- 
put, and measure signal 
amplitude at the cold end 
of C227 (1 pF). 

Next, tune L204 for peak 
output, and measure signal 
amplitude at the base of 
Q17. Then go back and 
tweak L202 and L201 for 
maximum signal at the 
base of Q17 with the chan- 
nel selector switched to 
channel 11 or at the center 
of your frequency scheme. 
Tweak L203 again for max- 
imum output. 

Receiver Tune-Up 

Select channel 1. Inject 
a modulated signal at 28.5 
MHz at the antenna con- 
nector or, if a signal gen- 
erator is not available, con- 
nect a 10 meter antenna 



J-CiOi 

Tap* 7 



Xtal # 


Old Xtal 


New Xtal 


x-205 


23.330 MHz 


24.865 MHz 


x-206 


23,380 


24,915 


x-207 


23.430 


24.965 


x-208 


23.480 


25.015 


x-209 


23.530 


25-065 


x-210 


23.580 


25.115 



Table 2. 



TP 




H2,3M70fl 



Fig. 4. 



Place the mode switch to 
AM and tune L18 and L19 
for maximum audio output 
or maximum band noise. 
The S-meter can be used as 
a tuning indicator. Slowly 
decrease the injected sig- 
nal strength, and tune LI 8 
and L19 for maximum 
receiver sensitivity. This 
completes receiver conver- 
sion. Switch the mode 
switch to USB and run 
through the channels; if the 
band is open, and an anten- 
na is connected, signals 
should be heard. 

Fine Tuning Modification 

There are two proven 
modifications to the fine 
tuning. One uses the origi- 
nal varactor diode circuit, 
the other requires that a 
variable capacitor be add- 
ed. 

Modification 1 is the 
easiest and requires only 



that the green wire on the 
fine-tune pot be moved 
from the tap to the wiper. 

The brown and green wires 
are both on the wiper after 
modification, This allows 
the transmit and receive 
frequencies to track to- 
gether ± 600 Hz. 

Modification 2 requires 
that a 15-75-pF variable be 
mounted in place of the 
fine-tune pot, and that 
D205 and R208 be removed 
from the xtal-plexer board, 
(See Fig. 1 .) A wire from the 
variable capacitor is con- 
nected to the circuit board 
where the cathode of D205 
was originally. This modifi- 
cation allows the transmit 
and receive frequencies to 
track ±2.5 kHz. {See Fig, 

2.) 

Transmitter Tune- 
Up— USB and AM 

Place the mode selector 



OlS 
IMGQ 



R64 
470K 

-***m 



fh 



C69 ; 

0047,aF 



/TT 






019 
IN60 



C7Q 
00 UF 

HI— 



m 



<& 



010 
25H33E 



019 

2 SAT 3 30 



■ 04 7>F 



*63 



/T7 



? S 6K 



C74 

oait»iF 

HI — 





-)l — « 



020 
2SCS3 9 



R72 
£,7K 



*flVPC 



Fig- 5. 



61 





Q20 1 




Q20T 






Q20? 






W.Q? 




03.0* 








2-4 U Hi 
OSC 


* Wl*Eff 




AMP 




28MK* 




?6MHi 

a MP 






02O3 


Q2G4J 




Of 




t 










OSC 


* eyFTf« 




AMP 
















05 


M 




0U,3,* 




QT 












JiUHi 

Q5C 


tlMKl 

* BUFFER 




8ALANCC0 

MOD 




MMHJ 

AM? 




FILTER 






IC20I 








T 




t 




OS* 






029 






D5.6 






032 






yic 


if 

* AMP 




ALC 




PWR 
AMP 


^ 


QRlVFR 






J 

0?06 


i 










32- 










AGC 4 




J METER 
OET 




P/RF 

METER 





fig. 6. Transmit USB. 



switch in the AM position 
Connect a dummy load to 
the antenna connector 
through a power indicator. 
Now, while keying the 
mike, adjust L2 for max- 
imum output of rl This 
will be fairly low, perhaps 
less than 1 Watt. Next, in 
order, tune coils L3, L4, L5, 
L7, and Lb for maximum rf 
output In the AM mode, 



full output power is about 
3,8 Watts with 13.8 V dc 
supplied. Switch the mode 
switch to USB and whistle 
into the mike. About twice 
the rf should be indicated 
on the output Remember 
to check the frequency of 
the rf at the antenna. Re- 
member also that 28.5 MHz 
USB is very close to the 
phone band's edge! 



Transmitter Tune-Up— LSB 

This part of the conver- 
sion is optional. If LSB is 
desired, follow the next 
few steps. Change CI 31 to 
36 pF and change C91 to 36 
pF; put the removed C91 
(39 pF) in place of C94 (47 
pF). Place the mode selec- 
tor in the LSB position Key 
the mike, remembering to 
use a 50-Ohm dummy load 
on the antenna. Tune L15 
for maximum rf. The fre- 
quency should be about 1 7 
MHz, depending on the 
channel you have selected. 
Tune LI 6 and LI 7 for max- 
imum rf while monitoring 
at the junction of R2 and 
R3 T (See Fig. 4 t ) Now 
modulate the rig. An LSB 
signal should be present at 
the antenna. Check the re- 
ceiver for good sensitivity. 
It may be necessary to re- 
tweak LIS, L16, and L17 for 
best results. 

Noise Blanker 

Lastly, I noted that the 



SSB-75 does not incor- 
porate a noise blanker cir- 
cuit, although the SSB-100 
does. Actually, the foil pat- 
tern for the blanker is on 
the SSB-75 circuit board, 
and the components can 
be added for less than $10. 

A schematic of the 
blanker used in the 
SSB-100 is shown in Fig. 5. 
Components are common, 
but substitution of semi- 
conductors is not recom- 
mended. These exact semi- 
conductors are available 
from Fugi Svea Electronics. 

Summary 

This collection of notes 
is provided for your infor- 
mation, and may not work 
in all SSB-series radios. 
However, two SSB-75s are 
now on the air at this QTH 
and working like champs. 
Good luck! If you run into 
trouble during this conver- 
sion, drop me a line, and 
maybe I can help, 73. ■ 



MFJ ENTERPRISES. INC 1979 



NEW MFJ DELUXE 3 KW Versa Tuner IV 



The MFJ-984 Deluxe 3 KW Versa Tuner IV gives you a combination of features that 
only MFJ offers, like . . . exclusive RF ammeter , dummy load, SWR, forward, reflected 
power meter, antenna switch, balun. Matches everything from 1.8 thru 30 MHz: coax, 



balanced lines, random wires. 




FREE MFJ LOGBOOK . . . 

Just ask your MFJ deafer to demonstrate 
this MFJ-984 Versa Tuner IV. Logbook 
quantities are limited. 




This is MFJ's best 3 KW Versa Tuner IV. The 
MFJ-984 De&m 3 KW Versa Tuner IV gtves you 
a combination at quality, performance, and tea 
lures thai others can't touch at this price. 

PERFORMANCE: You can run up to 3 KW PEP 
and continuousl y match any feedline from 1 .8 to 
30 MHz: coax, balanced line or random wire. 

FEATURES: A 10 amp RF ammeter insures 
maximum power to antenna at minimum SWR. 

A separate meter gives SWR. forward, reflected 
power in 2 ranges (2000 and 200 watts) 
1 A flexible antenna switch lets you select 2 
I coax lines thru tuner and 1 thru or direct, or 

random wire, balanced line or dummy load, 
I A 200 watt 50 ohm dummy load lets you tune 
I your exciter off air frjf peak performance 



Alt metal, low profile cabinet gives RFl protec 
hon, rigid construction Black Anodized aluminum 
front panel 5*14x14 in. 20 pounds. 

A flip stand tills tuner for easy viewing. 

Efficient, encapsulated terrile 4:1 balun. 500 pf, 
6000 vol! capacitors, 1& position dual inductor, 
17 amp ceramic rotary switch, 2% meters, 
SO 239 coax connectors Ceramic feedthru lor 
random wire, balanced line. Binding post lor ground 

QUALITY: Every single unit is tested for per- 
formance and inspected for quality. Solid Amen 
can construction, quality components. 

The MFJ-9&4 carries a full one year limited 
warranty. 

For your nearest MFJ dealer, call toll free 
800-647 1800. Stop by your dealer Compare it 



feature Joe feature with other tuners. Compare its 
value, its quality and its performance 

After a truly skle by side companion, you'll 
be convinced that its value, quality and features 
make it a truly outstanding value. 

Why not visit your dealer today? II no dealer 
is available call toll free 800 647-1 S00 and order 
direct from MFJ. $8.00 shipping. 

MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC. 

P. O. BOX 494 ^mk 
MISSISSIPPI STATE, MS 39762 
CALL TOLL FREE .... 800-647-1800 

For technical information, order repair status, in 
Miss., outside continental USA, can 601-323-5869, 



62 



v* Readtr Service— see page 19S 




DELUXE PLUG-IN MOBILE MOUNT 

with every 21 Ox Limited Edition Transceiver. This 
Model DMK provides for easy plug- in and removal of 
the 21 Ox for mobile operation, Complete with DC 
cable, reverse polarity protection, circuit breaker, 
and mounting hardware. 



SPECIAL 

OFFER! 

$60 

VOX/SEMI-BREAK-IN CW KIT 

with every AC Console. Provide VOX and Semi- 
break-in CW operation. An ideal addition for the 
home station. 





To mark this impressive accomplishment Atlas is producing a 

special model of this remarkable transceiver. 



ATLAS 2 1 Ox 

LIMITED EDITION 



With these new features added: 

• Receiver Incremental Tuning (R J.T.) 

• CW coverage on 1 meters 

• Power Increased to 250 watts 

• Special front panel with commemorative 
gold name plate 



With over 16,000 Atlas 2l0x/215x*& In the field, the high 
performance and durable dependability of this rig has 
been proven beyond question. 

Take advantage of this special offer now. Supply is 
limited! 



STILL AT THE 
SAME LOW PRICE 




^H3 



11240 W\ Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90064 213/477-6701 
931 H. Euclid, Anaheim, Calif- 92801 714/772-9200 

Butler, Missouri 64730 816/679*3127 



Henry Radio 



Price* suttee! to change without notice 



63 



At Last! A Really Simple Speech 

Processor 

-5dB for $10 



Add some punch to your signal. 



Jeff Stadeiman W9UT 
Bob Sieingart WB90EC 
Box 38 
Pound Wi 54161 



Amateurs are always 
looking for ways to 
add a little extra punch to 
their signals I guess it's 



just a natural inborn ham 
instinct to want to be 
louder than the other guy. 
And, of course, one of the 
most popular methods to 
get just a little bit more out 
of that transmitter is 
through speech processing. 
There have been count- 
less articles written on this 
type of signal enhance- 
ment, but many are very 



MIKE 
INPUT 




ULYVL 



ff? 



Fig. 1. The processor circuit. Transistors are 2N4Q8,GE2, or 
Radio Shack RS2004. Diodes are any germanium diodes, 
such as 1N27Q. 



complex and present prob- 
lems to the casual builder. 
This processor, however, 
while very simple and inex- 
pensive, is highly effective. 
The builder can expect to 
see a 2-5-dB improvement 
in signal strength. The total 
cost of this project should 
be no more than ten dol- 
lars, using all new compo- 
nents. 

The processor is con- 
structed on perfboard, 
wired point -to-point, and 
enclosed in a metal box. 
The individual builder, 
however, may wish to de- 
sign and etch a circuit 
board, or incorporate the 
unit directly into the trans- 
mitter. The input, output, 
and voltage-switching cir- 
cuits have been left un- 
finished. The builder may 
want to incorporate a 



switching network of his 
own design. 

The authors have used 
this processor in many con- 
test and DX situations, and 
have received nothing but 
glowing reports from 
listeners. This simple, inex- 
pensive processor should 
make a worthwhile ad- 
dition to nearly any sta- 
tion. ■ 



Parts List 



1 

3 
3 

i 
i 

1 
1 

2 

1 
2 



330k 

100k 

10k 

560Q 

50k pot 

,047 uF 

470 pF 

10 uF electrolytics 

.2uF 

2N4Q8, GE2, or RS-2004 
transistors 

2 1N270 diodes or similar 
Box, hardware, switches 




There's a new, eighth OSCAR satellite in orbit, and the AMSAT team helped put It there! 

Your help is needed for future satellites. Join AMSAT and support the new. ad- 
vanced Phase 111 series of OSCARs. engineered to provide communications over 
transcontinental distances for hours at a time. 

Send $10 membership dues to AMSAT, P.O, Box 27. Washington, DC 
20044. Life membership is available for a tax-deductible donation of S I 00 
or more, payable In quarterly installments if you wish. 

Phase HI satellite solar cells may be sponsored for $10 each, and 
we" II send you a certificate specifying the cells you are sponsoring. 

For a tax-deductible contribution of $1,000 or more, we'll 
even Inscribe your name on a plaque to be placed in orbit 
aboard the Phase III spacecraft for posterity, and well send 
you a replica honoring your contribution. 

Dues and contributions may be charged to VISA or 
Master Charge. Phone us at (202) 488-8649. 




64 



ALL NEW 




HIGH-PERFORMANCE HF TRANSCEIVER 



Today's technology, backed by a proud tradition, is yours to enjoy in the 
all-new FT-1 01 ZD transceiver from YAESU. A host of new features are teamed 
with the FT-1 01 heritage to bring you a top-dollar value. See your dealer today 
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iecast front panel, plus heavy 
jty case 

uiftMn. fully adjustable, VOX 
rcuitry 

uilt-ln flF speech processor 
ir more "talk power" when you 
ndtt 





Digital plus analog frequency 
readout. Digital display resolu- 
tion to 100 Hz 






Rugged 6146B final amplifier 
tubes with RF negative feed- 
back 



RF end AF gain controls loca 
on concentric shafts for 
operator convenience 



d 

sated 




uift-trt threshold adjustable. 
3be blanker 

jutpped for SSB and CW 
aeration. Choice of wide or 
arrow bandwidth for CW (with 
nional CW filter installed) 



Full band coverage: 160 through 
10 meters, plus WWV/JJY 
(receive only) 




TX RX T or Iran see ive frequency 
offset from main dial Irequei 



Continuously variable IF band- 
width: 300 Hz to 2.4 KHz 



TRANS WITTER 

PA Input Power: 
180 watts DC 
Carrier Suppression: 

Better than 40 dB 

Unwanted Sideband Suppression: 

Setter than 40 dB @ 1000 Hz. 14 MHz 

Spurious Radiation: 

Better than 40 dB below rated output 

Third Order Distortion Products: 

Better than -31 dB 

Transmitter Frequency Response: 

300-2700 Hz (-6 dB) 

Stability: 

Less than 300 Hz in first 30 minutes after 10 

min. warmup; Jess than 1 00 Hz after 30 minutes 

over any 30 mm. period 

Negative Feedback: 6 dB @ 14 MHz 

Antenna Output Impedance: 

50-75 ohms, unbalanced 



SPECIFICATIONS 
GENERAL 

Frequency Coverage: 

Amateur bands from 1 .8-29.9 MHz. plus 

WWV/JJY (receive only) 

Operating Modes: 

LSB, USB. CW 

Power Requirements: 

100/110/117/200/220/234 volte AC. 

50/60 Hz; 13.5 volts DC (with optional DC-DC 

converter) 

Power Consumption: 

AC 1 1 7V: 75 VA receive (65 VA HEATER OFF) 

285 VA transmit; DC 13.5V: 5.5 amps receive 

(1 1 amps HEATER OFF), 21 amps transmit 

Size: 

345 (W) < 1 57 (H) x 326 (D) mm 

Weight: 

Approximately 1 5 kg. 

COMPATIBLE WfTH 
FT90WM ACCESSORIES 



Select switches For use with 
FV-901DM synthesized scan- 
ning VFO (option). FV-901DM 
provides scanners plus 40 fre- 
quency memory bank 



RECEIVER 

Sensitivity: 

025 uVfor S/N 10 dB 

Selectivity: 

2 A KHz at 6 dB down. 4.0 KHz at 60 dB down 

(1.66 shape factor): Continuously variable be- 

tweeo 300 and 2400 Hz (-6 dB); CW (with 

optional CW filter installed): 500 Hz at 6 dB 

dorvn. 1 .2 KHz at 60 dB down (2:1 shape factor) 

Image Rejection: 

Better than 60 dB (1 60- 1 5 meters); Better than 

50 dB (10 meters) 

IF Rejection: 

Better than 70 dB (160 t 80. 20-10 m); Better 

than 60 dB {40 rn) 

Audio Output Impedance: 

4-16 ohms 

Audio Output Power: 

3 watts @10% THD (into 4 ohms) 



Qfmo 



, 



Price And Specifications Subject To 
Change Without Notice Or Obitgation 




radio 



w 



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YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP., 15954 Downey Ave., Paramount, CA 90723 • (213) 633-4007 
YAESU ELECTRONICS Eastern Service Ctr., 981 2 Princeton-Glendale Rd„ Cincinnati, OH 45246 



New Life for Tube-Type Dippers 

— simple circuit reads out on your frequency counter 



From tube to transistor — without tears. 



Randy Prewitt K4UA 
2013 Sherwood Ave^ 
Monroe LA 712QI 

Don't misunderstand 
_ me, There's nothing 
technically wrong with the 
old Knightkit grid-dip 
meter It's just that when- 
ever I wanted to measure 
the frequency of a coil, the 
ac line cord was too short 
or I would invariably drape 
the power cord across a 
simmering soldering iron, 



nearly electrocuting my- 
self. 

So, something had to 
give, hopefully the line 
cord And it did, but not 
as quickly as initially 
planned. About a year ago, 
I started noticing an abun- 
dance of articles proclaim- 
ing the miracles of field- 
effect transistors (FET) and 
bipolars replacing tubes in 
many simple circuits. Then 
the light dawned and I 
planned my attack. After 
all, I needed a portable, 
cordless gdo to take to my 



Photos by KA4AAH 




beam antenna for measure- 
ments, and to get into tight 
spots in other electronic 
projects. 

Needless to say, not all 
attacks are successful, and 
my first few weren't Oh. I 
managed to transistorize 
the beast alright, but end- 
ed up with numerous false 
dips and erratic meter 
readings. Plus, the dial left 
much to be desired as far 
as accuracy goes. Since I 
had just completed a fre- 
quency counter, more 
lights began dawning. 



About the same time 
that I was mentally abusing 
myself for being so stupid 
as to louse up a perfectly 
good tube gdo just be- 
cause it had an ac line 
cord, Fred Teague W4RHJ 
showed me a breadboard 
gdo circuit he was playing 
with. I tried it, making a 
few modifications for my 
particular needs, and, 
amazingly, it worked the 
first time. 

Since I had already 
stripped the bulky tube 
components from my 




Side view of gdo, showing existing tuning capacitor, bat- 
tery, and vertically-mounted perfboard with circuit 



Top view of gdo, showing vertical mounting of perfboard 
transistor circuit and main tuning. 



66 



-*> 



I 



70of 



LI 



L.I **■ 



-» 



1 



70pF 
lOOpF 



-* TO Ffl£OU£.NCV 
COONTEf? 



r*— * 



rf? 



:|iok 



T" 



100 
PF 



HFCI 



_LlOOpF 



*f®t 



* 



Jin 

\ switch 



I 




4P, TQ BK 



02 

ZNT06, ETC 



^Qn 



POT 



IK 



p 



/n 



F/g: 7, 



Knightkit, it was a simple 
matter to clean up the 
breadboard version and in- 
stall the small perfboard 
circuit vertically in the 
Knight case. About all I 
kept from the original were 
the case, coils, variable 
capacitor, meter, and the 
combination switchpot 

You'll find the new cir- 
cuit to be simple, non- 
critical concerning parts, 
and reliable if good, sensi- 
ble rf wiring is followed. 

One of the novel fea- 
tures is the placement 
of diode D1 Through 
the pick-off capacitor, it 
rectifies a small amount of 
rf and drives the meter 
amp. Many circuits have it 
reversed, but this method 
allows using a Jess expen- 
sive transistor since we're 
dealing with dc and not rf, 



It makes the circuit less 
critical, too. Another fea- 
ture is an rf pick-off used to 
feed a frequency counter 
This allows you to read the 
dip from the meter and 
glance over at the frequen- 
cy counter for the num- 
bers. Super accuracy, Of 
course, you should retain 
the existing Knight dial for 
those times when you're 
hanging off the tower try- 
ing to get a dip on your new 
beam's frequency. At times 
like that, you sure don't 
need another piece of 
equipment like a frequen- 
cy counter bonking you in 
the head as you dangle 
from the tower; 

If you wind your own 
coils and build the unit 
from scratch, use Vi-inch 
forms with an RCA pin plug 
on the bottom and a mat- 



Parts List 

L1-L6— Existing coils from Knight grid-dip meter, or custom 

wound coils can be wound on Va-inch forms 

CI — Dual 50~pF variable, retained from original circuit 

D1— 1N914, or similar 

Q1— ECG 132 Syfvania, or similar HEP 

Q2— NPN garden variety 

B1— Nine volt battery 

RFC— 1 mH 

All resistors 1/3 Watt, capacitors in pF (mmf) unless specified 

Ml— Existing meter in Knightkit or 1 mA basic dc movement 

J1_ Pin jack 



1.5-3.5 MHz 
3.0-8.5 MHz 
8.5-20 MHz 
19-45 MHz 
45-1 15 MHz 



Coil Information 

75 turns, pi-wound Litz, three pis 

30 turns, 3-pis Litz wire 

30 turns, #24 close wound, Vi-inch form 

12 turns, #24 close wound, Yz-inch form 

4 turns, #22, spaced over 1 inch, Vi-inch form 




View of converted tube gdo f showing normal selection of 

coils. 



ing plug on the gdo. The 
lower frequency coils use 
thin Litz wire and the higher 
frequency jobs use #24 
wire, progressing to #22 
wire for the highest range 
coil. Using a frequency 
counter, you can calibrate 
the dial right on the money. 
Personally, I couldn't 
get along without mine 



now. And by the way, this 
tale does have a moral Ac- 
tually, it has two. First: 
Don't throw anything away 
which can be converted. 
Second: If the conversion 
doesn't work, don't de- 
spair, A better circuit will 
come along m the future. 
Welcome to the future; 
here's your better circuit. ■ 




To really master code, get Pickering Code Master instruction 
tapes. They're easy to use f easy to learn, complete and reliable. 
But don't just take our word for it, ask any ham. Or order a set 
and see for yourself, 

CM-1 Novice. A complete course with 5. 7 and 9 WPM code 
group practice. 

CM-TA General No instruction, jus! practice. x h hr at 1 1 WPM, 
1 hr at 1 4 WPM and S4 hr at 1 7 WPM Tape includes coded groups 
and straight text. 

CM-2 Extra Class. Mostfy straight text, some groups. 1 hr. at 
20 WPM. V 2 hr. at 25 and 30 WPM, 
All courses are two hours long and come with key sheets for 
checking probiem areas. 

To order, send your check, money order. Master Charge or Visa 
number (aJoog wrtft card expiration date) to Codemaster Specify 
number and quantity of tapes desired Tapes are $7 95 each, 
two for $1 4, and three for $1 9. Also specify 7" reel or cassette. 
Well send your tapes post paid by fourth class marl First cfass t 
Canada and Mexico orders, add $1 per reel, 50$ per cassette. 
To order by phone, call (401 ) 683-0575. 
R.L residents, add 6% 
saJes tax 

Pickering 
Codemaster Co., 
P.O. Box 396 D. 
Portsmouth. Rl J 
02871 



Pickering Codemaster. Your key to code. 




v* Reader Service— $99 page 196 



67 



You Ought To Be in Pictures 

— here's what the guys on 14,230 are doing 



The status of SSTV. 



Dave Ingram K4TWJ 
Eastwood Village, #120! South 
Rt. II, Box 499 
Birmingham AL 35210 



The ever-increasing 
number of slow-scan 
signals being observed on 
our high-frequency bands 



is factual evidence of this 
mode's acceptance bv 
amateurs around the 
world. Visual communica- 
tions, with its modern 
reflections of a "Golden 
Age in Electronics," ob- 
viously inspires many inno- 
vation-minded amateurs. It 
is indeed refreshing to see 
such technical proneness 
gain popularity in this 




This SSTV picture, which was received from Dick K6SVP, 
shows the Voyager spacecraft approaching the planet 
Saturn. The targe white object in the top right-hand corner 
of the picture is a parabolic dish on the spacecraft The 
' 'gear "looking item on the left of the Voyager is part of 
the units probe. The "snow" at the top of the picture was 
due to noise on 20 meters. 



modern computer age. 
Many technical and opera- 
tional expansions have 
favorably affected the 
world of SSTV recently. 
This article is presented as 
an "update account" of 
these expansions. Some of 
the more prominent techni- 
cal innovations will be con- 
sidered first, then I will 
discuss the operational 
and future aspects of slow- 
scan TV. 

Digital-Scan Conversion 

The unlimited expan 
sions associated with digi- 
tal scan conversion have 
definitely established this 
method as the ultimate 
technique for serious SSTV 
work. Home-brew scan con- 
verters, however, are be- 
coming somewhat scarce in 
the US since Robot's Model 
400 gained popularity. This 
is simply because one can- 
not build a slow-to-fast-scan 
converter (with its as- 
sociated 65K of memory) for 
less money. Building a digi- 
tal scan converter without 
the use of prefabricated PC 
boards is also a hair-pulling 
experience. 

Robot's 400 is perfectly 
suited for technical expan- 
sions, the most promising 



one presently being dual 
65K memories. This ap- 
proximately $180 addition 
can be used for implement- 
ing real-time color, restrict- 
ed motion, and special pro- 
cessing of interference- 
ridden pictures. Dr. Don 
Miller W9NTP and Dr. 
Robert Suding W0LMD are 
presently the leading 
pioneers in these areas. 
(W9NTP may still have these 
"second memories" avail- 
able, If interested, send Don 
a large SASE for full details.) 

Medium-Scan TV 

One of the most out- 
standing new concepts to 
affect our world of visual 
communications recently 
is the evolution of the 
medium-scan TV system. 
This super-expansion of 
SSTV combines the best 
features of both the fast- 
scan and slow-scan worlds 
and results in a high resolu- 
tion-motion TV system ca- 
pable of international com- 
munications. The prime in- 
stigators of this system are 
W9NTP, W3EFG, WB8DQT, 
W6MXV, and W0LMD. Ad- 
ditionally, W9NTP has dem- 
onstrated this system to 
several European amateurs 
interested in operating 



68 



medium scan from their 
areas. The prime objective 

of this amateur "special in- 
terest group" is to be the 
first to effect transatlantic 
communications with live, 
motion TV. 

Technically speaking, 
medium-scan TV is a 128 

horizontal line by 128 
vertical pixel double-inter- 
laced system with a 35-kHz 
bandwidth. There are 7.5 
fields transmitted each 
second, and a 4-bit sync 
code is used to designate 
the specific fields. Color 
may be employed with this 
system by properly encod- 
ing each field with red and 
green signals while also in- 
tegrating the black and 
white components to pro- 
duce the "Y" signal, Spe- 
cial Temporary Authoriza- 
tion from the FCC has been 
granted to the previously- 
mentioned amateurs to 
permit transmissions of 
these wideband signals on 
the high end of 10 meters. 

A simplified block dia- 
gram of medium-scan TV is 
shown in Fig, 1, Since nar- 
rowband FM is employed 
in this system, some easily 
assembled circuits and an 
ordinary FM receiver re- 
place the station's regular 
high-frequency trans- 
ceiver. A Robot 400 or 
similar scan converter with 
dual 65K memories is used 
to decode and reconstruct 
the received pictures and 
present them to a conven- 
tional fast-scan television. 

Simultaneous Audio and 
Video 

Several techniques for 
multiplexing sound and 
SSTV have been investi- 
gated, but this form of 
communication hasn't yet 
gained widespread accep- 
tance. The simplest and 
least expensive method of 
multiplexing audio and 
video involves using a 
Motorola MCI 596 in its 
conventional AM modula- 
tor/demodulator config- 
uration. These circuits are 
included in recent issues of 



Motorola's applications 
notebooks. 

Single-Memory, 
Compatible-Color SSTV 

Mike Tallent W6MXV 
has been developing a 
single-memory color sys- 
tem which has substantial 
promise for SSTV use. This 
system, which is fully com- 
patible with our existing 
black and white SSTV sys- 
tem, employs slight modifi- 
cations of the R-Y, B-Y 
parameters used in conven- 
tional fast-scan TV con- 
cepts. 

Initially, a 737.5-Hz color 
subcarrier is modulated in 
quadrature (in phase and 90 
degrees out of phase) with 
color-difference informa- 
tion, while luminance 
SSTV modulates the 
regular 1500- to 2300-Hz 
bandwidth. At the receiv- 
ing end, a continuously- 
transmitted color pilot 
signal is processed and 
used to reproduce the 
color-burst phase refer- 
ence and control clocking 
of the D-to-A converter. 
Basically, this concept per- 
mits the interlaced and 
phase-shifted color infor- 
mation to be loaded in 
main memory along with 
the regular SSTV. Next, this 
information is accelerated 
to fast-scan rates, re- 
moved, and used to con- 
struct R-Y, BY, and Y 
signals which drive a con- 
ventional fast-scan TV. 

While Mike's system suf- 
fers the same problems 
associated with our present 
NTSC (fast-scan) system 
(high black and white resolu- 
tion but poor color resolu- 




This is an SSTV picture of a human eye operation. The 
operation jig which holds the probe is fitted to the eye dur- 
ing such operations as cutting the pupil area and inserting 
a new lens, The picture was the first of a series received 
from Dave W5DUU. 



tion), it has the definite ad- 
vantage of low-cost com- 
patible color. This ex* 
perimental concept may 
well prove to be tomorrow's 
accepted method for real- 
time color SSTV. 

The Software Situation 

There is a natural 
tendency for specialized 
modes of communication 
such as SSTV to attract a 
larger number of technical- 
ly-oriented amateurs than 
on-the-air operating en- 
thusiasts, As a result, SSTV 
developments have out- 
paced meaningful on-the- 
air usages. Naturally, we 
would like to encourage 
more "applications-ori- 
ented" video enthusiasts to 
join our ranks. If you have 
ideas or are involved with 
activities which can be 
shared with others through 
visual communications, the 



world of SSTV is a haven for 
endless opportunities. Possi- 
bly the following brief 
discussion of some recent 
amateur accomplishments 
with SSTV will help spur 
your thoughts along these 
lines. 

N6V and the gang at the 
Jet Propulsion Labs were 
true pacesetters of SSTV 
programming with their on- 
the-spot reports and views 
of Mars during 1977, The 
JPL gang is continuing 
these activities during 1979 
with SSTV retransmissions 
from the Voyager space- 
craft on a mission to 
Jupiter, Saturn, and 
Uranus. 

Dave W5DUU, an ac- 
complished eye surgeon in 
Texas, frequently transmits 
pictures of human eye 
operations which are fasci- 
nating to view, Dave's ac- 
companying explanations 



v 



1 ufHQflr 

HOBOT 
SCAN C0NV 



10 l*E7£R 
QSCILLATQft 



tO MITER 

Atipuren 



'Cm MKHT SA»D WIDTH 
Fit SIGNAL 



w 



TRANSMITTER 



29M»c 



PHlfiVP 



23MHf 



MIXER 



B9MH: 



COMMERCIAL 
FM 

RECEIVES 



C0MP. 



VIDEO 



2 MEMORY 
ROBOT 
SCAN CONV 



60VMI 



: : : 



-- 



o 

o 



FAST SCJUM 
TV SET 



Fig. 1. W9NTP medium-scan TV system which may be used on the high end of 10 meters. 



69 



Call or Write for Delivery or Quote 

ICOM IC701 
with AC/MIC 




LEAVE A MESSAGE & WE'LL CALL YOU BACK! 



All prices fob Houston, except *h©r* indicated Prices subject to change 
without notice, an items guaranteed Some items subiect prior sale Send 
letterhead lor Dealer price list Texas residents add 6% tax please 
add postage estimate. *1 00 minimum W5GJ. W5MSS. K5AAD N&Jj 
AG5K W5VVM. WD5E0E K5ZD WA5TGU. WBSAYF, KSHC, KSBGB 
WB5USV 



MASTERCHARGE ■ VISA 

MADISON 

ELECTRONICS SUPPLY, INC 

1508 McKINNEY • HOUSTON, TEXAS 77002 

713/658 026fl 



From time to time 73 Magazine makes Its subscriber (islg available, 
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Fonts na CA 

Wc carry the following: ICOM. Midland. Am- 
com, DenTron. Kl.M. S*an, Drake, Ten -Tec. 
Wilson. SST. MFJ. Hy-Gain. Lunar. Nye- 
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Store Ftint in i Electronics, 86 2S Sie-rri \»f., 
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Santa Clara CA 

Bay area"?, newest Amateur Radio store, Ncw& 
used Amateur Radio sales & service. We Fea- 
ture Kenwood, ICOM, Wilson, Yaesu. Atlas* 
Ten-Tee A many more Shaver Radio . JS9Q 
Loehlnviir Attune, Sanli Clam CA 9M51. 
247-4ZHL 

Denver CO 

Espenmcnicr's paradise! Electronic and 
mechanical camponenu for computer people, 
audio people, hams, robot builders, expert* 
menterv Open sm da>f j <*cti Gairwa? Fin> 
tronioi Corp.. 2*39 W. 44th Ate.. Den%rr CO 
80211, 458-5444, 



Paul 



New Castle DE 

WAJQPX. Rob WAJQLS-Serving 



amateurs in southern New Jersey, Delaware, 
and Maryland with the largest &tock of amateur 
equipment and accessories in Delaware 
Detawsre Amateur Supply. Tl Mcadoft Road. 
New Ca»l*t DF 1972A, 321-7728. 

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KENWOOD— I AfcSV— DRA&£ 

The *OfSd ! s most famasiic amateur show- 
room' Yoa goita see il lo believe it' Radio 
Wholesale, 2012 Auburn Atenue, Cnlumbus 
GA 11406. 561-7000. 



Preston ID 

Ross WB7BYZ. has the Uracst Slock of Ama- 
teur Gear m the Iniermountain West and the 
Best Price*. Call mc for all your ham needs, 
Rob Dblritetinf, 78 So- Stair, Preston ID 
83263. 852 -08 JO. 



Terre Ha tilt IN 

Your harn headquarters located in the heart of 
the midwest* Homier Electron la. Inc.. 43 H 
Meadow* Shipping Outer, P.O. Box 2WL 
Terre Haute EN 47802, 238-1456. 



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The nam new* of ISLE* you can rely on. Ken- 
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Kd.. Hi. 119, Littleton MA 014*0, 4»WlM». 



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St. Louis MO 

Experimenter'* paradise? Electronic and 
mechanical components for computer people, 
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Camden NJ 

X-Band (& other frequencies) Microwave 
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makes — HP, GR, FXR „ ESI. Sorensen, Singer, 
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Syracuse NY 

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disappointed with equipment verw ice. Radio 
World, Oneida Count* Airport ^Terminal 
Building, Oriskan) %\ IM24. 137-2622, 

Cleveland OH 

Need service on your late model or old lime 
equipment? We service all mpke*, L uiJ modeis. 
Rates £19.% hr. Call or write. Communieii- 
tiuits World, Inc.. 4788 Stale Hd.. Cleveland 
OH 44109. 39»^363. 



Scmnton PA 

ICOM. Bird. CushCrait. VHF Engincmn« # 
Antenna Specialists, Barker & Williamson, 
CDE Rotatori. Ham-Keys, Belden, W2AU/ 
W2VS, Share. Re*«ncy t CES Tosidb-Tooe 
pads, Radio Amateur Calibook*. LaRae Elee- 
troaics, II 12 Graadvjew St.. vranton PA 
IS509. 343^2 124. 

Souderton PA 

Tired of lookioj! at ads 777 Come and try our 
new and used equipment yourself— personal 
advice from our si a If a 60 years combined ham 
experience. Electronic Exchange. 134 N. Main 
St., Soudenoa PA 11964, 713-1 200, 

Houston TX 

L\ penmenl eC* paradise! Electronic and me- 
chanical components for computer people, 
audio people, hams, robot builders, u- 
peiimemert, Open six days a *eek- Gateway 
Electronics lac.. 1932 Oarkcml, Houston TX 
77W3, 97B-6S7S. 

Port Angeles WA 

Mobile RFJ shielding for elimination of igni- 
tion and alter tutor noise*. Hon ding straps. 
Components fm ,+ do-U-yoUrscir* projecti. 
Plenty of free advice. Eslea I niiiiicerlng, °M> 
Marine Drive. Port An^rln WA 98162, 457- 
WMM. 



DEALERS 

Your company name and mma$e cart contain 
up to 25 trordi for as Uttit as J/50 yeariy 
(prepaid)* at $15 per month (prepaid 
qtwrteriy^ Vo mention of ma&ordrr business 
or area code permitted. Directory ttxf and pay- 
ment must reach us 45 days in advance of 
publication. For example, advertizing for the 
August isxue must be in our hands by June 
18th, Mail to 7J Magazine. Prtrrboraugh NH 
QJ458. ATTN: A fine Cautu. 



70 



l^ Reader S#/vie# — see page 195 



COlCR 
SSTV > 
INPUT 



MHtTEflJ 
AMPLIFIER 



SSTV 
OEMCD 



4/D 

CONVERTER 




■If & * 
HAl* 

MEM OR t 



nl 



BANDPASS 

F1LTES 6 
UtPLiFtER 



COLOR PILOT 

PROCES$HHG 
CIRCUITRY 





.3P 



COLOR 
CLOCH 



Fig. 2< Simplified block diagram of W6MXV single-memory color SSTV system 



of these operations pro- 
vide a detailed account of 
modern optical tech- 
niques. 

Meanwhile, W1BCW 
continues retransmitting 
SSTV pictures received 
from our weather sat- 
ellites, W6KZL shows his 
hydroponic greenhousing, 
and XE1JOF describes the 
Mexican pyramids and 
points of interest in his 
area. 

These examples of SSTV 
applications illustrate 
many aspects which are 
possible when our mode is 
effectively put to use. We 
need to see more transmis- 
sions of this nature on the 
HF bands. 

ISSS 

During early 1978, I 

began planning to form an 
International Slow-Scan 
Society. The prime objec- 
tive of this organization 
will be to affect SSTV ex- 
pansion and acceptance 
from both technical and 
operational standpoints on 
a worldwide basis. Thus 
far, a number of slow scan- 
ners have joined in this ef- 
fort (providing whatever 
services are consistent with 
their interest and ability), 
and we have established 
liaison with countries in 
four of the six continental 
areas. Eventually, we plan 
to sponsor our own con- 
tests and activities, pro* 
vide an SSTV "newcomer 
assistance" service, estab- 
lish hardware and software 
library services (which will 
function like QSL bureau 
systems), produce a quar- 
terly SSTV newsletter, and 
much more. Naturally, we 
need the support of all ac- 



tive slow scanners to en- 
sure that these plans suc- 
ceed, If you are interested 
in supporting ISSS, send 
me one or two SASEs and a 
brief note describing your 
particular areas of interest. 
Your first SASE will be re- 
turned when the next ISSS 
newsletter is produced, 
and the other SASE will be 
held until a subsequent 
newsletter (or specifically 
requested information) is 
available. 

I would like to hear par- 
ticularly from amateurs in- 
terested in joining my ISSS 
plans to assist some 
poverty-stricken areas in 
our "third world " Some 
countries are not self- 
sufficient because their 
yearly rainfall will not sup- 
port the needs of their 
populations. Missionaries 
and engineers try to teach 
the inhabitants modern 
techniques of water engi- 
neering—irrigation, con- 
tour farming, and so on, 
but their success is 
somewhat restricted by a 
lack of native acceptance. 
This is an ideal chance for 
SSTV to prove its merit 
while also helping man- 
kind! 

Getting Started in SSTV 

I hope that many non- 
slow scanners are reading 
this article out of curiosity, 
and I would like to en- 
courage you to investigate 
the fascinating world of 
SSTV, An "arm and leg" in- 
vestment isn't necessary 
for one to equip his station 
with slow-scan capability. 
The W6MXV monitor, for 
example, performs very 
well and costs approx- 
imately $100 to build. 



Another great home- 
brew unit is the W0LMD 
video-sampling monitor. 
Larry Prior WA9MFF sells 
PC boards for this out- 
standing P-7-type unit. 
Amateurs interested in 
'going first class" can pur- 
chase a Robot 400 for ap- 
proximately $700 and be 
set for any innovations that 
may evolve in the fore- 
seeable future. If you don't 
care to purchase a com* 
mercial video monitor to 
use with the 400, Robot's 
optional VHF oscillator 
will allow this scan con- 
verter to drive your regular 
TV set via its antenna ter- 
minals. I've used this 



method for several months 
with my 400 and Sony TV, 
and it works great. 

Summary 

The world of SSTV con- 
tinues to be a wide-open 
field for amateurs in- 
terested in enjoying new 
modes of communication. 
It has reached a high 
degree of technical ad- 
vancement and become an 
accepted mode of long- 
distance visual com- 
munication. We are now in- 
terested in using this mode 
to its fullest capability and 
sharing our world with 
others, 

Whether you are a tech- 
nical innovator or operat- 
ing enthusiast, consider 
this article an open invita- 
tion to join our ranks. If 
you need additional in- 
formation or assistance, 
simply contact our SSTV 
net which meets each 
Saturday at 1800 CMT on 
14,230 kHz . . m of ask any 
SSTVerB 



Call or Write for Delivery or Quote 

KENWOOD TS180S 




LEAVE A MESSAGE & WE'LL CALL YOU BACK* 

MADISON 

ELECTRONICS SUPPLY, INC. 

1508 McKINNEY • HOUSTON, TEXAS 77002 

713/658-0268 *^M3S 

MASTERCHARGE • VISA 



All p^ces fob Houston, except *here indicated Prices subject to change 
without notice, all items guaranteed Some t terns subject prior sale Send 
letterhead for Dealer price list Texas residents add 6 a fa tax please 
add postage estimate. SI, 00 minimum W5GJ, W5MBB, K5AAD N5JJ. 
AG5K. W5VVM, W05EDE K&20 WA5TGu\ WB5AYF, K5RC, K5BGB. 
WB5USV 



p* Reader Service— see page 195 



71 



Floyd Fellows WA4CLG 
2449 Duncan Drive 
Belleair Bluffs FL 33540 



How to Toot Your Own Horn 

— and stay on key 



Try out this simple pitch generator. 




tf 




Photo 1, Front panel of completed standard pitch 
generator. 



Chances are that if you 
are not a musician, 
then you probably have a 
"harmonic" who is. But if 
not, you just gotta have 
musical relatives or 
friends! So f you are bound 
to find some use for a sim- 
ple electronic circuit 
which produces an accu* 
rate "A" or "B^" for tuning 
orchestra or band instru- 
ments. 

Construction is easy, and 
will not take much time to 
complete See Fig. 1. The 
oscillator is quite standard; 
it is one shown by Jan 
Crystals on their catalog 
sheet The oscillator pro- 







Fig. h Schematic of pitch generator and power supply, 



duces 4400 kHz or 4662 
kHz. 

Through the use of four 
7490 ICs, a dividing circuit 
is set up whereby the oscil- 
lator frequency is divided 
by 10,000, This gives you 
440 Hz and 466 Hz. These 
are, of course, in the audi- 
ble range and are the mu- 
sical tones "A" and "ftb ' — 
tuning frequencies used by 
band and orchestra instru- 
ments, 

The photos and drawings 
are self-explanatory. You 
should have no problem 
putting the components on 

the .V'x.V'perf board (Fig, 
2). Also, a drilled PC board 
is available for $5/18 post- 
paid from Rick Allran, PO 

Box 974, Waynesville NC 
28786. 

I used sockets for ICs 
and the transistor. It is 
recommended that you use 
wire-wrap IC sockets since 
the extra length of the ter- 
minals allows easier solder 
attachment of the wires. 
Of course, you can wire- 
wrap if you like. An octal 



72 





fl 


fl ■ 



I 



I 



;l i 



i 
i 



■ 



i 



M 



U 



[ I 



; Specfa/! 




YEASU FT 227R -2-Meter 

RETAIL $385.00 

NOW $279.00 

Add $3,00 shipping and 
handling/unit (USA) 





ALPHA 

ATLAS 
COLLINS 

DENTRON 
DRAKE 

HY GAIN 

ICOM 
INFO-TECH 
KENWOOD 

MOSLEY 
STANDARD 

SWAN 

TEMPO 

TEN-TEC 

WILSON 

YAESU 

AND MANY 

"others. 



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• 



i 



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l 
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il ■ 



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8340-42 Olive Blvd • PO Box 28271 • St Louis MO 63132 




— 



socket is used for mount- 
ing the two crystals. I 
removed the unused 
socket terminals. Proper 
drilling of the perf board 
allows you to mount the 
octal socket by bending 
the terminals. 

The crystals I used were 
not expensive spe- 
cials—simply 005% ac- 
curacy, They are in the $2 
class. 

When the perf board is 
completed, you can mount 
it and the other com- 
ponents in any suitable 
cabinet. The power supply 
is my version of a compact 
"Japanese" assembly, 
mounted on a 3-lug ter- 
minal strip. Photo 2 and 
Fig. 3 show this neat setup. 
The voltage regulator 
socket (a transistor socket), 
filter capacitor, rectifier, 

PL J* Of tC BOAW 



and bypass capacitors, are 
all mounted together. The 
cabinet acts as the heat 
sink for the voltage regula- 
tor. 

If you have trouble find- 
ing a cabinet, as I did, the 
Radio Shack chassis in the 
parts list is an economical 
substitute. I closed the 
back of the chassis cabinet 
with a piece of perf board. 
You can add a W-Amp fuse 
to the 120-volt ac power in- 
put For true portability, 
the unit could be powered 
with batteries, in which 
case you should use the 
alternate ICs listed — the 
74C00 and 74C90s — be- 
cause their current drain is 
less. 

I selected the volume 

control value to allow 
some audio to be heard 
even when set at minimum. 

BOAXQ MOUNTING QfTAtL 












\\Cttiil 






• * 

7 




*cw = 

TlRMIM- 
C'i 



»*£*!rBO**D 



1' f~-\ 



E 



v v " r 







\ 



■bolt utith ■. 



.1 i ,l 



VOLUME 



I.,' :. 



F/g, 2. Component layout 

Parts List 
1—7400 IC. 1 Consider low-current ICs such as 
4—7490 IC, I 74C00 and 74C9G, if battery supply is used. 
1— 4400-kHz crystal, Jan .005%, or equivalent. 
1— 4662-kHz crystal, Jan .005 % ( or equivalent, 
1 —Selector switch, 2-pole, 3-position, Use Radio Shack #275-1386. 

Omit 3 positions. 
1—2N2222 Transistor. 
1— Speaker; miniature— 4-10 Ohms. 
5— IC sockets, I4*pln wire-wrap. 
1— Resistor, 'A-Watt, 330 Ohms. 
1— Resistor, 'A -Watt, 470 Ohms. 
1— Resistor, V^Watt, 10 Ohms. 
1— Resistor. %-Watt. 100 Ohms. 
1— Volume control, 150-200 Ohms. 
1— Trimmer capacitor, 5-30 pR 

Power 

1— Transformer, 117/12.6 volts— 300 mA or higher. 

1— Full-wave rectifier, 1A, 50 volts or higher. 

1— Regulator, 7805 (5 volts). 

1— Capacitor, 500 uF, 15 votts or higher 

1— Capacitor, .33 uF tantalum. 

1— Capacitor, .1 uF (disc), 

1— Perfboard— 3W x 2W\ with .1" x ,1" perforations. 

1— -Cabinet (Radio Shack Chassis #270-247). 

1— Cabinet back, 

1— Line cord— 117 volts, with plug. 

Misc.— Grill cloth, bolts, nuts, cabinet feet, markers, etc. 



This helps you to remem- 
ber to turn off the unit. 

When you have the proj- 
ect buttoned up, you are 



ready to sound a near-per- 
fect "A" or "fib". You can 
be sure you're in tune when 
you match this tuner. ■ 




Photo 2. Method of mounting power supply components, 




Photo 3. Interior of standard pitch generator. 



TRAHMTQ* SOCKET 
FQfl JttCULJTO* 



™ 5«C 




90LT 



RECT 



TANTALUM 



fltC" 



TO TfUNS. 




fig, J. Power supply component mounting details 



74 



The Scanning Memorizers 




FT-127RA 

(220 MHz) 

FT-227RB 

(1 44 MHz) 

FT-627RA 

(50 MHz) 



The FT-1 27RA, FT-227RB and FT-627RA, FM transceivers, allow scanning and expanded memory coverage for the 
demanding VHF FM operator. All feature up/down scanning capability with control from the microphone; the scanner 
will also search for a busy or clear channel. Four memory channels are available — two for simplex, three for repeater 
channeis.oneforasplitof up to 4 MHz. Other performance features are similar to those ot the renowned FT-227R. 

OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT 

Keyboard Microphone: YM-22 for FT-127RA and FT-627RA; YM-23 for FT-227RB (YM-22 standard feature with 

FT-227RB) • Squelch Unit • FP-4 AC Power Supply 



CPU-2500R/K 2 M FM Transceiver 

with Central Processing Unit 



ye age of computers has entered the amateur scene 
th the announcement of the CPU-2500R/K 2-meter 
J\ transceiver. Controlled by a 4-bit central processing 
lit (CPU), the CPU-2500R/K contains a scanner, 4 
emory channels, manual or automatic tone burst, an 
rtional sub-audtbie tone squelch, and 25 watts output. 

\e keyboard microphone allows two-tone input for 
rtopatch or control purposes, as well as* remote pro- 
arnming of dial or memory frequencies. 

jtomatic ±600 kHz repeater split, or program a split up 
4 MHz using the memory. Keyboard microphone 
bws remote programming of odd splits. 

D U scanner will search for a busy or clear channel, 
x>n your command, 

xir memory channels for simplex or repeater use, plus 

mother memory channel for a split of up to 4 MHz. 





#^CM 



C&A Electronic Enterprises 

Distributors of Commercial and Amateur Radio Equipment 

22010 S. Wilmington Ave., Suite 105 

Carson, CA 90745 



Available from C&A Electronics 

Call for best price. 

800-421-2258 

(TOLL FREE — OUT OF CALIFORNIA) 

213-834-5868 

(CALIFORNIA) 



§^ Reader Service— see pegs 795 



75 



A Junk-Box HT Charger 

— power to the portables 



Very nice at a $5 price. 



Sunny Mitchell WB9JL Y 
Box 438 
Sparta Wl 54656 



Wouldn't it be nice to 
have a charger for 
the Wilson HT on the bed- 
side stand, in the living 
room, garage, or wherever 
else you might like to 
monitor? This would allow 
you to listen and still keep 
your batteries charged so 
you could pick it up and 
go. 

I decided that I would 
like one, so I checked the 
spare parts department 
(junk box) for necessaries 
and home brewed a cheap 
charger that works as well 
or better than the factory 
model 

Its features include: 

Constant charge rate in 
both high and low mode; 

Low charge rate ad 
justable so batteries will 
stay charged while moni- 
toring; 

Use of voltmeters and 
milliammeters if desired 



MO VAC 

ION iNDtCATOfl] 



«£V£*S£ 

CURPL 

BLOCK 



and available, but they are 
not necessary (more on this 

later). 

Construction 

Any small box will hold 
the parts; I prefer the 
SVT'x 6" x 3" box from 
Radio Shack. The trans- 
former should deliver 
about 25 volts at the 
secondary. I found one 
with 48 volts center-tapped 
and used one side for 24 
volts. A bridge rectifier is 
used. The capacitor value 
is not critical; in fact, you 
can even leave the 
capacitor out and the 
charger will work. I 
measured the current drain 
of my Wilson [in standby) 
and found it to be 25 mA in- 
stead of the 14 mA stated 
in the specs, so I adjusted 
resistance to give 30 mA on 
low charge and 55 mA on 
high charge. This is about 
the correct rate (50-60 mA) 
for slow^charging AA 
nicads. You could fast- 
charge at 150-200 mA 
without any problems, but 



MAROE LIMIT &ULB 



ft! 

ioon 

DIVIDER 




£10 
ADJ 
MI-LQ 
RATE* 



T.S 

■ ♦ 



+ CI .<*2 

5 1 - lOOO tO JfLCOH 
2oooo*r fgw 



HRIttHAJ. St HEP CQMT4CT5 
FO* BOTTOM 0* 7 *LL SON 




Fig. 7. 



I think it is easier on the 

cells to use the slow rate of 
about one-tenth the Amp- 
hour capacity, 

A 0-15-volt dc meter is a 
helpful option across the 
output terminals to deter- 
mine the condition of the 
cells. At full charge, the 
meter will show approx- 
imately 14 volts with the 
HT in the charger. Also, the 
condition of the cells is 
determined by the voltage 
drop observed by transmit- 
ting with the Wilson in the 
charger. If the cells are 
good, a 2Vi-Watt HT will 
cause a voltage drop of Vi 
to 1 volt. If the voltage 
drop is much greater, it is 
probably caused by a weak 
or dead cell. A milliam- 
meter is an option, but one 
should be used to adjust 
the values of resistance to 
set the proper charge rate 
when constructing the 
charger. 

The problem of contacts 
for the charge terminals on 
the bottom of the Wilson is 

- 

solved by using a barrier 
terminal strip and spade 
lugs bent to 90 degrees 
with a short length of #12 
solid copper wire soldered 
into the spade lugs. The 
hole in the top of the case 
is cut with tin snips and the 
edges are smoothed and 
covered with rubber 
molding or tape. Pop rivets 



are handy for mounting the 
barrier strip and trans- 
former, and a hot-melt glue 
gun can be used to hold 
some small parts. The 
1CKK)hm voltage divider 
makes adjustment of high- 
low charge rates simpler. 
Be careful to handle the 
110-volt primary side of the 
circuit with care. I advise 
grounded plug and chassis, 
a fuse atone Amp H and the 
use of a microswitch to 
turn the primary on/off 
when the charger is in or 
out of use. 

It is also a good idea to 
insulate or cover all 
110-volt connections in- 
side the case. Don't forget 
the rubber grommet to pro- 
tect the power cord and to 
provide some sort of strain 
relief (a knot will do). 

Summary 

The fourth charger I 
built was completed in 
about two hours from 
mostly junk parts, and it 
works like a charm. So get 
busy and have some fun 
building one or more. They 
are not critical, just watch 
the milliamp charge rate. 
Considering that the com- 
mercial version is about 
$40, these are very nice at 
about $5, depending on 
what you find in your junk 
box. I found the box, which 
I bought, to be the most 
costly item at about $4. ■ 



76 



Someone offered a 2 Meter F 
the features you want at a price 




IT'S 

ABOUT 

TIME... 



• 25 Watts 
Fully Synthesized 

• 144- 148 MHz 

5 KHz Steps 

• Provisions for 
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x 1 0-3 /4(D) 





1979 FM-28 

only 5295.00 



NOW AVAILABLE WITH SSSSSSCAN 




FM-28 WITH SCANNER OPTION 

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Scan capability 144-147.995 MHz 

Scan entire band or memory J 

Up to 800 channel memory 

Internal battery holds 
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Scanner option can be 
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FM-28 * 



The 



With or without Scanner option - 
2 Meter value of the year. 

ORDER DIRECTLY FROM 





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5395.00 For FM-28 with scanner option 
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77 



SCR 1000 



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ft 





Full Autopatch, with or without reverse patch, 

and "Landline" or Radio Remote Control of the 

Repeater. 

Radio and/or Landline TouchTone™ Remote 

Control of such repeater functions as Ht/LO 

Power; Patch Inhibit/Reset; Switch ID Tracks; 

Repealer ON/OFF; PL GWOFF; 

65 WL Transmitter! 

"PL"CTCSS; HI/LO Pwr.; Multi -Freq, 

Up to 4 different IDs; Automatic switching to 

"Emergency Power ID" when on battery pwr. 

Ultra sharp 10 Pole Xta! Filter; Xcntr. Xtal 

oven— for the 'ultimate" in stability. 

Timeout— Timer Reset Tone Annunciator 



Shown In Optional Cabinet 




Along with a complete line of Repeater 
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The SCR100O— simply the finest repealer available on the market — absolutely TOP QUALITY 
throughout . . . and often compared to (lesser featured) units selling for 2-3 times the price! This is a 
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panded Memory CW IDer f full metering and lighted status indicators/control push-buttons, 
crystals, local mic, etc 

Join the thousands of very pleased Spec Comm customers world-wide who are using our gear 
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tm— Registered Trademark of AT&T 

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.^IDWOO Automatic Base 
* Station CW identifier 



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'Automatically IDs your 
Station (Bass or Repeater) 
per FCC requirements 
every 5-30 mln. (adjust- 
abFe). 

> Meets all FCC require- 
msnti for Parts m, 91, 93, 
95, 97 4 ol her appi matrons. 
'Convenient Front Panel 
Controls for AC Power; 
Trigger Mode: (Automat- 



IciCOR, Continuous, or 
Disable); Manual ID; Local 
Monitor Spkr. Volume. 

• Front Panel Status In- 
dicator Lights lor AC 
Power. ID in progress, DC 
Power operation 

• By lit -In AC Pa war Supply 

• 12VDC Battery Input 
w auto-switchover to 
"Emergency Power," 



• Optional "Emergency 
Power ID." 

• Adjustable CW Tone Pitch, 
Speed & Level, 

• Provision for up to 4 dif- 
fer am ID channels I 

• Plug-In IC Memory Chip! 

• Two Inhibit Inputs, 

• Sid. 19" Rack Mount 



Mobile/Portable/Base 
Transceivers also 

available! 

5-25 Wt.; 2, 6, & 12 Chan; 2M & 

220 MHz. 




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SCR 100 Receiver Board 

Wide dynamic range! Reduces overload 

sense', and 1M 

Sens. 0,3 uW20 dS Ot typ. 

Set -6dB a ± 6 5 KHz, HOdB # *30KH2, <8 

Pole Crystal Flir ) 

5 Meter' OulpuL 

Exc audio quality* Fast squelch! $135.00 

w/xlaL 

SCR100 Receiver Assembly 

SCR100 mourned in shielded housing 
Same as used on SCR 1000 
Completely asmbid- w/F T caps, S0239 conn.. 
AF GAIN POT. etc, $205-00 





SCAP Autopatch Board 

1 Provides all basic autopatch functions 

1 3 Digit Access; 1 Aux, onfoff function; Aurilo 

AGC; Bullt-m Timers; etc. 

See our Dec 73 Ad for details. $23500 

RPCM Board 

Used w/SGAP board to provide Reverse Patch 

and land-line coniroi of rptr. 

Incfudes land line '■answering 1 ' circuitry. $79 95 

WP641 Duplexer 

Superior Band Pass/ Band Reject design 

Provides great rejection of "oul*of~ band" 

Signals 

Eatremeiy easy to ad^uM 

-93 dB typ isolation $520,00 (fully ckd out 

wfSCRtQOO). 








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FL-6 Rcvr. Front-End Preselector 

• 6 HI Q Resonators with FET preamp, 

• Provides tremendous rejection of 'out-ot-band" 
signals w/out the usual loss? Can often be used 
instead of large, expensive cavity fitters. 

• Extremely helpful at sites with many nearby 
VHF transmitters 

• Gain: ap*. 10 dB 

• Selectivity: -20 dB # ±2.0 MHz: -60 dB @ 
±GMH2(rYp.].$85.D0 

TRA-1 Timer Reset Annunciator Board 

• Puts out a tone "beep" on rptr. xmti\ apx. t sec. 
after rcvd signal drops— thus allowing Ume for 
breakers 

• Resets rptr. time-out timerwhen tone is emitted 

• Adjustable time delay and lone duration 

• For use with CTClOOand ID100/250 

• $20,95 (Add $29 95 for inst. & ck, out in 
SCR1O00) 



CTC 100 CQR/Timer/Control Board 

i Complete COR circuitry 

> Carrier Hang' & T.O. Timers 

i Remote Kmtr. Inhibit Reset control 

t Provision for panel control switches & lamps 

i 100% Solid Slate CMOS logic 

i Many other features $36.00 

ID 250 CW ID & Audio Mixer Board 

t Adjustable ID tone, speed, level, timing cycle 
* 4 Input AF Mixer & Local MIc amp, 
I GOR input & xrntr. hold circuits. 

> CMOS logic; PROM memory— 250 bits/chan. 
i Up to 4 different ID channels! 

> Many other features. Programmed $75 00 
(1 chan J Add i Chan, $4,00 ea. 

y Local MIC: $18.95 



C0MMUNICA TI0NS 



FL6 




SCT110 Xmtr/Exciter Board 

• 7 or 10 wis Output. 100% Duty Cycle* 

• Infinite VSWR proof 

• True FM for exc. audio quality 

• Mew Design— specifically for continuous rptr. 
service 

• Very low In "white noise" 

• Spurious -70 dB 

• With .0005% xtal. $139,95 

• BA 10 30 Wt Amp board & Heat Sink. 3sec. LPF 
& rel. pwr sensor. $52.95 

SCT11D Transmitter Assembly 

• SCT1 10 mounted m shielded housing 

• Same as used on SCR1QG0 

• Completely asmbid. w7FT, caps. S0239conn, 

• 7 or 10 Wt, unit $205.00. Add $68,00 tor 30 Wt. 
unit 




*^SB 



(Ship. 



TTC100TOUCHTONE 
CONTROL BOARD 

TTC100Touchtone Control Board 

• 3 digit ON. 3 digit OFF control of a single 
repeater function. Or, 2 functions ON (2 digits 
each) with 1 digit (each) OFF. 

• Can be used to pull In a relay, trigger logic, etc. 

• Typically used for Rptr. ON/OFF. HI/LO Pwr.. 
P.L ON/OFF, Patch Inhibit/Reset, etc 

• Stable, anti-falsing design. 5s. Umif on access. 

• S8500 {$135.00 inst. & ckd. out in SCRiOOOl 

• Custom Programming— + $15 00 

• For Aikfl Functiort(i,-Add a Partiai 7TC" 
Board. $42,00 



Send tor Data Sheets! 

/Handt.—$3.75 PA residents add 6% fax; 



Norristown, PA 19401 • {215)631*1710 




v* Reader ServtCQ — see page 795 



79 



Protect Your Home-Brew Panels 



no more spraying 



The slick way to slick fronts. 



Michael Black VE2BVW 
16 A/iwoth Road 
MontreaL Quebec 
Canada HS Y 2E7 



So you've finished your 
latest project, Now 
you're ready to label it. A 
popular way to do this is to 
use rub-on lettering, such 
as Letraset, This gives a 
professional look to your 
work, something which is 
impossible with label- 
makers. But with Letraset, 
your project will soon look 
awful if you don't protect 
the lettering from scratch- 
es. To overcome this prob- 
lem, many builders spray 
their panels with Krylon or 
some equivalent. This is 



the method I used until I 
came across one which I 
believe to be better. 

The method I use now is 
to cover the panel com- 
pletely with the material 
which is used to cover iden- 
tification cards and other 
things, Basically, this stuff 
is clear plastic with an 
adhesive backing. While 
more expensive than using 
clear spray, the method 
does have the advantage 
that only a very sharp in- 
strument can scratch 
either the lettering or the 
panel. 

The material I used is 
called "Protecta." It costs 
me $2.50 for a sheet 18 by 
72 inches. This, or another 
brand, should be available 
just about anywhere. Just 
go to your local stationary 
store and ask for that 



adhesive plastic stuff 
which is used to cover ID 
cards and books, 

Now for some info on us- 
ing this panel-protecting 
method. First, be sure that 
the panel is clean and that 
all the holes have been de- 
burred. Is the lettering just 
as you want it? Adhesive 
plastic is fairly permanent. 
If you want to remove it 
later, you will have to 
discard it and you may 
even pull off some of the 
lettering. 

The next step is to cut 
the plastic to size, with 
about Vi inch extra on 
each side Pull the paper 
backing from the plastic. 
Apply the plastic to the 
panel slowly and evenly. 
Watch out for air bubbles. 
If you see any of these, pull 
off the plastic a bit and re- 



apply it with some pres- 
sure. With luck, you now 
have the plastic down with 
no air bubbles. 

Co over the panel, apply- 
ing pressure all over. Turn 
the panel over onto a solid 
surface. Use a sharp knife 
to cut the excess plastic 
from the edges of the 
panel. Once again turn the 
panel over, so that the 
plastic is facing you. With 
the sharp knife, clear out 
the holes. Use a downward 
motion and cut the plastic 
right at the edges of the 
holes. For the smaller holes, 
the knife may not work too 
well, and I'd suggest using 
a sharp, tapered instru- 
ment such as an ice pick. 
Simply push the imple- 
ment through the plastic 
until it fits the hole. Now 
your panel is ready. ■ 




Our famous value-packed mail order catalog 
filled with thousands of Amateur Radio items. 
Now ready to roll and yours for the asking . . . 
Call Tufts today for prompt delivery of your 
Amateur Radio needs from our tremendous 
inventory. Let us show you why Tufts is the leader 
in mail order sales. 



Our crew of 100% hams, very competitive prices, and reliable modern 
service facilities ensure your complete satisfaction. Call toll free daily 
9-9 and Saturday 9-6 H800) 225-4428. 




i^T3 



209 S Mystic Avenue 

Medford MA 02155 

1-(800)225-4428 

i -(61 7)395-8280 



80 



v" Reader Service — see page 795 



CALL TOLL FREE 



% i 



Communications Center 

443 N 48th Street 
Lincoln, Nebraska 68504 
In Nebraska Cat! (402)466-8402 



*^C58 



HY-GAIN 



TH6DXX 
TH3MK3 
TH3JR 

Hy Quad 

205BA 

1558A 

105BA 

204BA 

204MK5 

153BA 

103BA 

402 B A 

BN-86 

TH2MK3 



5 upe r T h un derbird 

3 el. 10*1 5-2GM beam 
3et. 10-15-2QM beam 

2 el. 10-15-20M Quad 

5 el. "Long John" 20M beam 
5 eL "Long John" 15M beam 
5el;'"Long John" 10M beam 

4 ei. 20M beam 

5 el. conversion kit 

3 el, 15M beam 
3 el. 10M beam 
2eL 40M beam 

Balun for beam antennas 
2 el. 10-15-20M beam 

Classic 33 
Classic 35 
TA33 
TA 36 
TA-33 Jr. 
TA-40KR 



Regular 

$299.95 

229.95 

149,95 

229.95 

289.95 

109.95 

119.96 

219.95 

99.95 

7995 

54.95 

209.95 

1 5.95 

149.95 



Special 

$239.95 

179.95 

129.95 

179.95 

229,95 

139,95 

99,95 

179.95 

7935 

69.95 

44.95 

169.95 

15,95 

119.95 



1SHT 

18AVT/WS 

14AVQ/WB 

1 2 A VQ 

14RMQ 

5BDQ 

2BOQ 

66B 

203 

205 

208 

214 

LA-1 



Hy -Tower 80-10M vertical 

80-1 0M Trap vertical 

40-1 GM Trap vertical 

20-1 OM Trap Vertical 

Roof Mounting kit (verticals) 

80-1 OM Trap doublet 

80-40M Trap doublet 

6 el, 6M beam 

3eL 2M beam 

5 ei, 2M beam 

8 el. 2M beam 

14 el. 2M beam 

Deluxe lightning arrestor 



Regu lar 


Special 


299.95 


239,95 


Z7 u ■ %7 3 


79.95 


69.95 


57.00 


39.95 


32.95 


33.95 


Ma 3 »VV 


89,95 


69.95 


49,95 


39 ,95 


119.95 


99,95 


15,95 




17.95 




25.95 




31.95 




59.95 


49.95 



MOSLEY 

3eL 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 
6 el. 10, 15, 20 Mtr, beam 
3 el. 10, 15,20 Mtr. beam 
6 el, 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 
3 el. 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 
40 Mtr, Add On 



Regular Special 

304,75 209.95 

392.75 269.95 

264.00 189.95 

392,75 269.95 

197.00 149,95 

119,95 89.95 



CUSHCRAFT 



ATB-34 

ATV-4 

ATV-5 

ARX-2 

ARS 

ARX220 

AR X 450 

A14411 



4 ele. 10 r 15, 20 Mtr, beam 
10, 15, 20, 40 Mtr. Vertical 
10, 15, 20, 40, 80 Mtr, Vert 
2 Mtr. Ringo Ranger 
6 Mtr, Ringo 
220 Mhz. Ringo Ranger 
435 Mhz. Ringo Ranger 
11 ele. 144-146 Mhz. beam 



3-TBA 

4-BTV 

5BTV 

RM 75 

RM75S 

G6-144B 

G7-144 



ical 



289.95 
89,95 

109.95 
39.95 
36.95 
39.95 
39.95 
36.95 



219.95 
69.95 
S9.95 
32.95 
32.95 
32.95 

HUSTLER 



A1 47-11 

A1 47*22 

A144-10T 

A144^20T 

A147-20T 

A430-1 1 

A432-20T 



11 ele. 146-148 Mhz. beam 

22 ele. Power Pack 

2 Mtr, 'Twist" 10 ele. 

2 Mtr. 'Twist" 20 ele. 

2 Mtr, beam 

432 Mhz. 11 ele, beam 

430-436 Mhz. Beam 



3 ele; 10, 15,20 Mtr. beam 

10-40 Mtr. Vertical 

10-80 Mtr. Vertical 

75 Meter Resonator 

75 Meter Super Resonator 

2 Mtr. Base Colinear 

2 Mtr. Base Colinear 



259.95 
99.95 

134.95 
1 6.95 
31.95 
79.95 

119.95 



189.95 
79.95 

99.95 
14.50 
27.50 
59.95 
89.95 



WILSON 



TAYLOR 



System One 5 ele. 10, 15, 20, Mtr, Beam 

System Two 4 ele, 10, 15, 20 Mtr. Beam 

System Three 3 ele. 10, 15, 20 Mtr, Beam 

WV-1 10-40 Mtr. Vertical 



$299.95 

249.95 

199.95 

79.95 



$239.96 

199.95 

159 95 

69,95 



HQ1040AV 10-40Mtr. 
Trap vertical 



ROTORS 

Hamlll $125.00 T2X Tai (twister $199.95 

Call for prices on rotor cable, Coax, Towers, and Accessories. 



36.95 
109.95 
42.95 
62.95 
62.95 
34.95 
59.95 



59.95 



Alliance HD 7 3 $109.95 

All prices do not include shipping. 



18HT 




We carry all m a j or brands of ham radios 

AT DISCOUNT PRICES 

Yaesu — Kenwood — Drake — (COM — Dentron — 
Ten-Tec — Swan — Tempo — Midland — E.T.O. — Wilson 



30.95 
89.95 
34.95 
52.95 
52.95 
29.95 
49.95 



v* Reader Service—see pege 195 



81 



MOW W BuWd 
Micro«n»puW 

■ ■ ■ 



**« 



How to 

Build a 
Micro- 
computer 

. . - and Really 
Understand It 



59.95 



* Complete circuit board layouts in- 
cluded 

* Ready-made boards available 

* Uses the popular 6502 chip (same as 
the KIM, PET, APPLE) 

* Uses readily-available parts 
it Component kits available 

While considerable information is available on the 
generalities of how a microcomputer works or how to 
program a microcomputer, you'll be hard pressed to 
find information concerning the construction of a sin- 
gle, specific system. 

Finally, electronic hobbyists are able to build their 
own microcomputer system with Sam Creason's 
book, 'How To Build A Microcomputer and Really Un- 
derstand It." Creason's book is a combination 
technical manual and programming guide that takes 
the hobbyist step*by*step ihrough the design con- 
struction, testing, and debugging of a complete 
microcomputing system. 

Once your computer has been property programmed, 
it can be a powerful tool for use in the amateur radio 
station. Examples include a CW generator, a digital 
voltmeter, and a programmable signal generator. This 
book is must reading for anyone desiring a true 
understanding of small computer systems. 



To order, write 73 Magazine Mail Order Dept. #S95 
Peterborough NH 03458, Include name and address 
and $10.95 ($9.95 plus $1,00 shipping and handling}. 



D Please rush my copy of "How To Build A Microcom- 
puter" (BK7325) 
Name 



Address 
City 



Apt#_ 



.State. 



.Zip 



□ I enclose $10.95 ($9.95 plus $1.00 shipping and 

handling) 
Q Bill my credit card 

D Visa C Master Charge 

Credit Card* Fxp date 



Signature 



73 Magazine Mail Order Dept. #S96 
Peterborough NH 03458 




the microcomputer-controlled 
appointment clock 



NEW 

First Time Offer 



— NOT A KIT — 

Regular Price $79.95 
Introductory Offer by 

Hal-Tronix 

only S69.95 



'-. iVi 




FEATURES: 



Sleek modern styling to complement any 

home or office decor. 

Tells the time. 

Tells the date and year, 

CJp-timer to 60 minutes, 59 seconds with 

pause. 

Alarm to ring at the same time everyday. 

Daily appointment sets appointments for the 

next 23 hours, 59 minutes. 

Future appointments up to one year. 

Dimmer switch for display. 

Memory will hold up to 30 appointments. 

Lithium power cell to retain memory during 

power outage. 

Appointments entered out of chronological 

order will be stored in chronological order. 

Colon Mashes once each second. 

AMJPM. indicator. 

Plugs into any wall outlet. 

Easy to read vacuum fluorescent display. 

Extremely accurate quartz crystal clock. 



EFFICIENT. REMARKABLE. 




TJmeTrac sold and distributed by HAL^TROHIX. Deafen welcome, 



J 



Send 15<I stomp or S.A^S.E* for Information and flyer on other 
HAL-TRONIX products. To order by phone* 1-313-265-4762. 




"MM" 



tV 41- 



HAAQLD C ISIOWLANO 
WtZMM 



Hal-Tronix 

P,0. Box 1101 
Southgote. Ml 48195 



»"H24 



SHIPPING 
INFORMATION. 



ORDERS OVER llVQO VILL BE SHIPPED POSTPAID EXCEPT 
ON ITEMS WHERE ADDITIONAL CHARGES ARE REQUESTED. 
ON OftDEAS LESS TH AN S % 5.00 PLEASE INCLUDE ADDITION- 
AL & 1.00 FOR HANDLING AND MAILING CHARGES. 



82 



V* Reader Service^ see page 195 




MICROCOMPUTING 



T\M 








Save %i5 off the yearly newsstand cost 



Subscribe to Kilobaud Microcomputing this month 
and take advantage of this half price offer. In addi- 
tion, we'll guarantee your satisfaction If you're not 
completely satisfied after reading your first issue or 
your eleventh, your money will be refunded on all re- 
maining issues. We guarantee your satisfaction be- 
i ause Kilobaud Microcomputing is the small- 
computer magazine written for the beginner as well 
as the expert. Kilobaud Microcomputing is the fore- 
runner of small business and home computing, Every 
month you'll read about the latest developments in 



hardware, software, applications and new-product re- 
views. 

So keep up to speed in the dynamic world of 
microcomputing by subscribing today, and save $15 
off the cover price for one year, or save even more 
on a three-year subscription at $45 (you save $45 off 
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(This offer good in U.S. only,)* 



M issues only $15! 

Subscribe now to the new Kilobaud Microcomputing and save 

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□ Payment enclosed Q Please bill me 



Dl2issues-*15 



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'Canjdun luhvcnpEion* *dd S2 pr» vejf All other foreign Add St ont yrir tubscfip honor* 
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"CitudiAn uibtcnpltom jdd %2 p** *c*r All olhrf hi* *4ffi add U, one ***» ubunpiintvoo- 
1?. PjiyabJr in V S tuffr/rn 



/96SC 



v 



j 



kilobaud 



MICROCOMPUTING 



T.M. 



P.O. Box997«Farmingdale NY 11737 



/ 



83 



Instant Software' Has it ail. 

Ask for Instant Software at your local computer store, use 
the handy order blank provided at right, or order your soft- 
ware by phone— call Toll Free 1-800-258-5473. 



for the TRS-80 



** 



INSTANT SOFTWARE 



IT.%4 



TRS-80* 

4K 
LEVEL* 

16* 
LEVEL II 



Ham 

Package 1 





PQQ7H r.iLi-uM IV'.h Inhlhtd Ditllwiiiii li . PlflPN 



i.i titj HMMM 



HAM PACKAGE I This versatile package lets you solve 
many ol the commonly encountered problems in elec- 
tronics design With your Level I 4K or Level II 16K 
TRS-SO, you have a choice ol 

• Basic Electronics with Voltage Divider— Solve prob- 
lems Involving Ohm's Law h voltage dividers, and RC time 
constants, 

• Dipole and Yegl Anlennarj— Design antennas easily, 
without tedious calculallons, 

This is the perfect pacKage for any ham or technician. 
Order No. 0007R S7J5. 

RAMROM PATROUTIE FIGHTERMLINGQN CAPTURE 
Buck Rogers never had it so good. Engage In extrater- 
restrial warfare with. 

• Ram ram Patrol — Destroy the Ramrom snips before 
they capture you. 

• Tie Fighter— Destroy the enemy Tie fighters and 
become a hero Of Ihe rebellion 

• Kilngon Capture— You must capture the Klingon ship 
intact. It's you and your TRS-80 Level II 16K battling 
across the galaxy. Order No. O028R $7.95. 

BUSINESS PACKAGE I Keep ine books for a small 
business with your TRS-80 Level I 4K. The six programs 
included are: 

• General tn forma lion— The instructions for using the 
package 

• Fixed As sat Control —This will give you a list of your 
fixed assets and term depreciation 

e> Detail Input — This program lets you create and record 
your general ledger on lape tor test access 

• Month end Year to Date Merge— This program will 
take your monthly ledger data and give you a year to dale 
ledger 

• Profit and Lost— With this program you can quickly 
get trial balance and prolit and loss statements. 

• Year End Balance— Tfi is program will combine alt 
your data from the profit and loss statements into a year 
end balance sheet. 

With this package, you can make your TRS-BO a working 
partner Order No. 0013R $29.ft5. 

BUSINESS PACKAGE ill This package can change your 
TRS-80 into a full working partner for any businessman: 

• Inventory — Maintain a computer based inventory for a 
conslant inventory system. 

• Commisions and Percentage*— Let your computer 
figure out markup and discount calculations, sales tax 
and more. This is a perfect time saving package tor any 
small business. 

For the TRS-50 Level I 4K Order No, 0061 fi J 7.95. 



AJR FLIGHT SIMULATION Turn your TRS^O Into an air- 
plane. You can practice takeoffs and landings with the 
benefit of lull instrumentation. This one-player 
simulation requires a TRS-30 Level I 4K, Level II 1BK. 
Order No 0O17R $7.95 

GOLF/CROSSOUT Have fun with these exciting one- 
player games. Included are: 

• Golf— You wont need a mashie or putter— or a cad- 
die, for that matter, to enjoy a challenging 18 holes. 

• Crossoul— Remove all but the center peg in this puz- 
zle and your neighbors will call you a genius 

You'll need a TRS-SO Level I 4K, Level H I6K Order No. 
00O9R S7,95, 

BASIC AND INTERMEDIATE LUNAR LANDER Bring your 
lander in under manual control. The Basic version is lor 
beginners; the Intermediate version is more difficult with 
a choice of landing areas and rugged terrain. For one 
player with a TRS-80 Level I 4K. Level II 18K. Order No. 
0WIRS7.&1 

SPACE TREK It Protect the quadrant from the Invading 
Klingon warships, The Enterprise la equipped with 
phasers, photon torpedoes, Impulse power, and warp 
drive. It's you alone and your TRS-80 Level I 4K. Level II 
16K against the enemy. Order No, DO02R $7.95. 

CAVE EXPLORING/YACMT/CONCENTRATION These 
three programs are not only fun, but stimulating as well; 
» Cave Exploring— Search for fabulous treasures as 
you explore the magic cave. For one player. 

• Yacht— One player can enjoy this game based on 
Yahtzee. 

• Concentration— Two players can pit their memories 
in this program based on the popular television show. 
Youll need a TRS80 with Level I and 18K, Order No, 
001 OR $7.9$. 

OIL TYCOON Avoid oil spills, blowouts and dry wells as 
you battle to become the world's richest ol! tycoon. Two 
players become the owners of competing oil companies 
as they search for oil and control their companies. Re- 
quires a TRS-80 4K Level I & II. Order No, G023R 57.95 

HEX PAWN/SHUTTLE CRAFT DOCKING/SPACE CHASB 
BATTLESHIP This four-game package is sure to provide 
hours of fun for the whole family. 

• Hex Pewn— Turn your TRS-80 Into a model of artificial 
intelligence by playing a simple game. 

• Shuttle Craft Docking -Land your shuttle craft on the 
starship — even through varying gravity fields' 

• Space Chase— Seek out and destroy the enemy delta 
that's hidden in the star field 

• Battleship— You must find and destroy the enemy 

fleet. 

This package requires a TRS-flO Level I 16K Order No. 
0041 R $7,95. 

SANTA PARAVIA AND FiuMACCtO Become the ruler of 
a medieval city state as you struggle to create a 
kingdom. Up to six players Can compete 10 see who *nll 
become the King or Queen lirst This program requires a 
TRS-80 Level I & II. Order No, 0043ft S7.9& 

CARDS This one-player package will let you play cants 
with your TRS-80— talk about a poker face! 

• Drew end Stud Poker— These two programs will keep 
your game sharp. 

• No-Trump Bridge— Play this popular game with your 
computer and develop your strategy. 

This package's name says it all. Requires a TRS-BG Level 
II 16K Order No. 0063R S7.95, 

PERSONAL FINANCE I Let your TRS-80 handle all tne 
tedious details the next time you figure your finances: 
e Personal Finance I— With this program you can con- 
trol your incoming and outgoing expenses 

• Checkbook — Your TRS-80 can balance your 
checkbook and keep a detailed list of expenses for lax 
time. 

This handy f inane ta I control for the home requires only a 
TRS-80 Level I 4K. Order No. 0027R S7,95. 



BOWLING Let your TRS-80 set up the pins and keep 
score. One player can pick up spares and get strikes. For 
the TRS-80 Level 1 4K, Level II 16K. Order No. 0033R 17.95. 
BACKQAMWOMfKENO Why sit alone when you can play 
these fascinating games with your TRS-80? 

• Backgammon— Play against the computer Your 
TRS-80 will give you a steady challenging game that's 
sure to sharpen your skills. 

• Kerto— Enjoy this popular Las Vegas gambling game. 
Guess the right numbers and win big. 

You'll need a TRS-80 Level I & II. Order No. 0004ft $795. 

ELECTRONICS t This package will not only calculate the 
component values for you, but will also draw a 
schematic diagram, too. You'll need a TRS-80 Level I 4K, 
Level it 16K to uae 

• Tuned Circuits and Coll Winding— Design tuned cir- 
cuits without resorting to cumbersome tables and calcu- 
lations. 

e 555 Timer Circuits— Quickly design eatable or 
monosiable timing circuits using this popular 1C. 

e LM 381 Preamp Design— Desygn !C preamps with I his 
low-noise integrated circuit. 

This package will reduce your designing time and let you 
build those circuits fast. Order No. 0006 R S7.95, 

DESTROY ALL SU BS/GU N B OAT $} BOMBER 
This package of three programs is fun for the whole fami- 
ly. Included are; 

• Destroy All Subs— Hunt down enemy subs while 
avoiding mines and torpedoes. A one-player game. 

e Gunboats — One or two players can try to blow each 
other's ships out of the water. 

• Bomber— Carefully release your bomb to destroy the 
moving submarine. A one-player game. 

To e n j oy t nese p rog rams, you ' 1 1 nee d a T RS-80 Level 1 4 K 
Order No. 0021 R $7.95. 

KNIGHTS QUEST/ROBOT CHASE/HORSE RACE This 
varied package of one-player games will give you hours 
of fun. 

e Knight's Quest— Battle demons to gain treasure and 
become a full-Hedged knight, 

• Robot Chase — Destroy the deadly robots without 
electrocuting yourself. 

• Horse Race— Place your bet and cheer your horse to 
the finish line. 

These programs require a TRS-80 Level 1 16K, Order No. 
0003R 57 95 

SPACE TREK III Let yourself go to the tar ends Of the 
solar system— and beyond. This package Include 

• Stellar Wars— Shoot down the Tie fighters and 
destroy the Death Star. 

e Planetary Lander— Land your spacecraft and plant 
your flag across the solar system. 
These one-player games require a TRS-80 Level I 4K 
Order No. 0031 RS7,95. 

SPACE TREK IV Trade or wage war on a planetary scale. 
This package includes: 

• Stellar Wars— Engage and destroy Tie fighters in your 
attack on the Death Star. For one player. 

• Population Simula Hon —A two- player game where 
you controt the economy of two neighboring planets 
You decide, guns or butter, with your TRS-80 Level II 16K. 
Order No. 0034R $7.95. 

CAR RACE/RAT TRAP* ANTIAIRCRAFT Enjoy these Chal- 
lenging, fun-filled programs: 

• Car Race— You and a fne-nd can race on a choice of 
iwo tracks. 

• Rat Trap — Trap the rat in his maze with your two cats. 
For one player. 

• Antiaircraft — Aim and shoot down the enemy air- 
plane. Requires Level l4KTRSaO.OrdvNo.001lRS7.95, 

STATUS OF HOMES/AUTO EXPENSES Two long- 
a watted programs that have got to save you money ai 
work or in the home: 

a Status ol Homes — This program will allow you to 
keep track of all the expenses involved in building one 
house or an entire subdivision. 

• Auto Expenses— Find out exactly what II costs you iO 
drive your car or truck. 

These programs require a TRS-80 Level I 4K. Order No, 
0012R 17.95. 



(TRS-80 continued) 

BOWLING LEAGUE STATISTICS SYSTEM This package 
Is the answer to the prayers of named bowling league 
scorekeepers The Bowling League Statistics System 
will keep a computerized list of league data, team data, 
and data for each bowler, it is extremely flexible and has 
a total of 16 different options to let you modify the pro- 
gram to suit your league's rules, The program is very 
easy to use and has extensive "built In" aids to help you 
along. Requires TflS-80 Level II 18K. Order No. G056R 
124,95. 

DEMO I This package is just the thing to show your 
friends what your TRS-80 can do. Included are: 

• Computer Composer— Compose and play music us 
Ing only a standard AM radio. 

■ BasehiHl— Play baseball with your computer while it 
does the scorekeeping. 

• Horse Rate— Place your bet and cheer your pony to 
the winner's circte- 

• ESP — Tesl your powers of extrasensory perception. 

• Hi- Lo/Tic-tac4oe— Guess the secret number or get 
three in a row. 

• Petals Around the Rose— Can you figure out the 
secret behind the five dice? 

• Slot Machine— Turn your computer into a one-armed 
bandit These programs require a TRS-80 Level I 4K, 
Order No, 0020R S7.0S. 

for the PET 




INSTANT SOFTWARE 



17. H 



i 

"PS 
ST& OIL £] 



er*T 



ttil any kfV 



cm »*t 



m *ttt 

II 



CH'Jl- 






Soft mmw*€\ 



DOW JONES Up to six players can enjoy this exciting 
stock market game. You can buy and sell stock in 
response to changing market conditions Get a taste of 
what playing the market is all about Requires a PET wilh 
8K, Order No. 0026P S7.9S. 

QUBIC-4VG0-MOKU Ptay two ancient games on your 
modern PET, The two programs included are: 

• Oubic-4— Play a multi-dimensioned game of tic-lac- 
loe 

• Go Moku— Line up five of your men while blocking the 
PET's moves. 

These one player games require 8K of memory. Order No. 

0038P $7.95. 

TREK-X Command the Enterprise as you scour the quad 
rant for enemy warships This package not only has 
superb graphics, but also Includes programming for op- 
tional sound effects. A one-player game for the PET BK. 
Order No, O032P $7.9S. 

PERSONAL WEIGHT CONTROUBIORHYTHMS Let your 
PET hefp take care of your personal heafth and safety: 

• Personal Weight Control— Your PET will not only 
calculate your idea] weight, but also offer a detailed diei 
to help control your caloric intake. 

• Btomythms— Find out where your critical days are lor 
physical, emotional, and inteuectua! cycles. 

You'll need only a PET with BK memory. Order No. 0005 P 
S7 9S. 

TANGLE/5UPERTRAP These I wo programs require tasl 
reflexes, and a good- eye tor angles: 

• Tangle— Make your opponent crash his line into an 
obstacle. 

• Superlrap — This program is an advanced version of 
Tangle with many user control options. 

Enjoy these exciting and graphically beautiful programs. 
For one or two piayers with an &K PET. Order No. 0029P 
S7,95, 



MORTGAGE" WITH PREPAYMENT OPTION/FINANCIER 
These two programs, will more than pay for themselves if 
you mortgage a home or make investments: 

• Mortgage with Prepayment Option— Calculate mort- 
gage payment schedules and save money with prepay- 
ments, 

• Financier— Calculate which investment wilt pay you 
the most, figure annual depreciation, and compute ihe 
cost of borrowing, easily and quickly 

All you need to become a financial wizard wllh an &K 
PET Order No. 0006P $7.9$. 

PENNY ARCADE Enjoy (his fun-filled package that's as 
much fun as a real penny arcade— at a fraction of the 
costl 

• Poeiry— Compose Ires verse poetry on your com- 
puter. 

• Trap — Control two moving lines at once and lest your 
coordination 

• Poker— Play ftve card draw poker and let your PET 
deal and keep score. 

• Solitaire— Don't bother to deal, let your PET handle 
the cards in this "old favorite" card game 

• Eat-'Em-Ups — Find out how many stars your gobbler 
can eat up be fore the game is over. 

These si* programs require the PET with 8K Order No, 
0044 P $7.95. 

CASINO I These two programs are so good, you can use 
them to check out and debug your own gambling sys- 
tem! 

• Roulette— Pick your number and place your bet wllh 
the computer version ol this casino game. For one 
player. 

• Blackjack— Try oul this version of the popular card 
game before you go out and risk your money on your own 
"Surefire" system. For one player. 

This package requires a PET with 8K Order No. 0014P 
S7.95. 

MIMIC Test your memory and reflexes wtth the five dif- 
ferent versions of this game. You must match Ihe se- 
quence and location of signals displayed by your PET 
This one-player program includes optional sound effects 
with the PET 8K Order No. 0039P $7.95. 

BASEBALL MANAGER This pair of programs will let you 
keep statistics on each of your players. Obtain batting, 
on-base, and fielding averages at the touch of a finger, 
Oata can be easily stored on cassette tape for Eater com 
rartson. All you need is a PET with 8K. Order No. 0062P 
ft4§& 

CHECKERS/BACARRAT Play two old favorites with youf 
PET. 

• Checkers— Let your PET be your ever-ready opponent 
in this computer-based checkers program. 

• Bacarrat— You have both Casino and BJackjack-aiyle 
games in this realisllc program. 

Your PET with BK will offer challenging play anytime you 
want. Order No. 0D22P 57.95. 

CASINO If This craps program is so good. H's the next 
best thing to being in Las Vegas or Atlantic City. It will 
noi only play the game with you. but also will teach you 
how to play the odds and make the best bets. A one 
pJayer game, it requires a PET8K. Order No. 001 5P 57.95, 



for the 
Apple** 



INSTANT SOFTWARE 



iT.« 



APPLE* 

20K 



Golf 




V-i <»n i'i*i#-iBcn-jii* ip: 



GOLF Without leaving ihe comfort of your chair, you can 
enjoy a computerized IB holes ol golf with a complete 
choice of clubs and shooting angles. You need never 
c a n c el I his game because of r a i n . O n e or t wo players ca n 
enjoy this game on the Apple with Applesoft II and 20K 
Order No. 0018A S7 9S 

BOW LING/TRILOGY Enjoy two of Americas favorite 
games transformed into programs for your Apple; 

• Bowling — Up to four players can bowf while the Apple 
sets up the pins and keeps score. Requires Applesoft II 

* Trilogy — This program can be anything from a simple 
game of itc-tac-toe to an exercise in deductive logic. For 
one player. 

This tun -filled package requires an Apple wllh 20K Order 
No, 0040A S7J5, 

DATA TAPES 

Top quality high density audio cas~ 
settes for data storage. Each cassette 
runs 30 minutes, and is fitted with conve- 
niently marked labels that make controll- 
ing your "data bank" a snap. Sold in tots of 
four. Order No. 0067. $7.95. 



A trademark of Tandy Corporation 



• A trademark ol Commodore Business Machines Inc. 



A trademark of Apple Computer Inc. 



r. 



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Ordered by 
Address . 



City 

Check 

Card No, . 

Signed 



Slate 



23p 



Money Order 



VISA AMEX Ma star Charge 

Expiration date 

Date 



Order your Instant Software today! 



Quantity 


Order No 


Program name 


Unit cost 


Total coat 
































































































Shipping and handling 




51. 00 


Instant 


So ft war 


B lflC. Oept. 73I5A 2 Peterborough NH 03458 


Total order 


L_ .J 



Now You Can Possess 

Instant Recall 

don't tell 'em the computer helped 



The call is the key. 



Ken Winters WB5UTJ/N5A UX 

5307 Marshfieid Court 
Arlington TX 76016 

How often have you 
been driving along 
monitoring your favorite 
frequency and heard some- 
one with a familiar call- 
sign, but you just couldn't 
remember the name that 
went with it? And if they 
gave you a call, they 
always threw your name in 
along with your call, of 
course. Sometimes it 
seems like a deliberate 
challenge designed to see 
if you can come back with 
the right name. Wouldn't it 
be nice if you could always 
respond with the name as 
well as the call sign the first 
time? Wouldn't it be even 
better if you could return a 
comment or ask a question 



about the fellow's home- 
town, favorite topic, or 
some other subject close 
to his heart? 

Those of you with in- 
stant and total recall may 
be excused now Described 
in this article is a recipe 
guaranteed to help the rest 
of us. Those of us, that is, 
who have either a comput- 
er or at least access to one, 
The two programs listed 
here are designed to pro- 
vide the capability of stor- 
ing, maintaining, and 
listing in alphanumeric 
order by callsign, the call, 
name, and telephone num- 
ber (or city) of all the mo- 
bile contacts you've made 
and wish to remember. 
Along with all that infor- 
mation, there is also room 
for comments and remarks 
about anything, such as the 
special interests of each of 



those operators (e.g., RDF, 
DX, computers, flying, sail- 
ing, etc.), 

The goal is to produce a 
list of stations worked by a 
mobile operator in a for- 
mat that is convenient to 
use while driving (if that's 
possible). In order to be 
convenient, the list must 
be printed in alphanumeric 
order by callsign on 
standard-size paper (8.5 by 
11 inches), The alpha- 
numeric sequencing is ob- 
viously required if a call is 
to be found easily in any 
list. The notebook-size 
paper lends itself to use on 
a clipboard, often standard 
equipment for the mobile 
operator. 

The BASIC programming 
language was chosen for 
the simple reason that 
BASIC is the most ma- 
chines n dependent lan- 



guage commonly used on 
both commercial and hob- 
by computer systems. The 
particular version shown 
here uses video display ter- 
minal (VDT) cursor posi- 
tioning control during the 
data entry and file 
maintenance functions. 
Also, the VDT "control 
keys" may be used as a 
shortcut to stopping the 
program or for bypassing 
the ''change" function. 
More about these features 
later. If your system does 
not support these special 
features, the appropriate 
program statements may 
be easily modified without 
changing the logical opera- 
tion of the programs. The 
only other statements that 
may need minor changes 
are the input/output state- 
ments (READ, WRITE, and 
PRINT) where, again, ad- 



Id 



86 



vantage was taken of the 
extensions available on my 
own particular system. 

As written, the "file 
maintenance" program re- 
quires about 1K of mem- 
ory, and the listing pro- 
gram needs about 700 
bytes. Each data record 
consists of from 6 to 58 
characters, depending 
upon how many actual 
characters were entered 
for each record. Even on 
systems that support only 
fixed-length records, a typi- 
cal floppy disk will still 
have enough room to store 
well over a thousand differ- 
ent contacts. Remember, 
the idea is to produce a 
listing for mobile contacts, 
not your entire log. 

The key to the whole op- 
eration is using a direct- 
access {also called a ran- 
dom-access) disk file with 
the callstgn being used as 
the "key" to each record in 
the file. The file manage- 
ment part of the operating 
system software automati- 
cally keeps each record in 
the proper sequence by 
"sorting" the keys as each 
new record is added to the 
file, The keys are kept in 
one area of the disk and 
the rest of the data in each 
record is kept in another 
area contiguous to the first 
area. Both areas together 
comprise the whole data 
file. 

Although there are 
several techniques used by 
different systems in han- 
dling direct-access data 
files, the result is basically 
the same. Each record may 
be retrieved directly 
without scanning the entire 
file looking for the par- 
ticular record desired. This 
obviously saves a lot of 
time getting any specific 
record, At the same time, 
the fact that each record 
has its own unique key 
eliminates the possibility 
of duplicate records being 
stored in the same file. Still 
another advantage of 
direct-access files is the 
fact that no separate sort- 



ing of the records is re- 
quired if the records are to 
be listed in order by their 
keys, By starting at the 
beginning of the file and 
reading it sequentially 
without specifying any 
key, all of the records in 
the file may be read and 
printed in alphanumeric or- 
der by callsign {key) auto- 
matically, since the file 
management system uses 
the keys area (usually 
called the "Directory") of 
the file to get to the 
physical records anyway. 

File Maintenance 

File maintenance simply 
means adding new records 
or changing or deleting old 
records in a data file. Pro- 
gram statements 0010 
through 0502 in the file 
maintenance program de- 
fine the names of the data 
items to be used in the pro- 
gram and OPEN the data 
file where all the records 
containing the information 
about the mobile contacts 
will be stored. Statements 
100 through 1050 clear the 
VDT screen and display the 
heading information which 
indicates the name and de- 
scription of the program 
being executed as well as 
the date. Each column of 
information is labeled with 
the appropriate name. The 
two-letter sets enclosed in 
apostrophes are special 
print control commands 
for output devices such as 
the printer and VDT. The 
CS means "Clear Screen" 
and is valid only for the 
VDT. LF means "Line 
Feed" and causes a blank 
line to be printed on the 
printer or displayed on the 
VDT. 

Many computer ter- 
minals have special keys 
called "function keys" or 
"control keys." These keys 
may be used as a shortcut 
method of indicating spe- 
cific actions to be taken by 
a program if that program 
has the ability to interpret 
them when they are used 
by the terminal operator, 



Since this program allows 
the operator to use these 
special keys, the actual 
functions that some of 
them are programmed for 
are also displayed when 
the program begins. 

Program statements 
2000 through 2440 handle 
the actual data entry por- 
tion of the file mainten- 
ance function. Each of the 
four data items is entered 
separately, and each is ter- 
minated by pressing the 
carriage return key {CR), 
The variable (data item) 
named "F$" was initially 
defined in statement 0070 
to be a string of 30 
characters, A very special 
character ("Control-Per- 
iod" on my terminal) was 
included in the DlMension 
statement for F$ between 



the quotation marks 
following the size 
specified for that data 
item. This special charac- 
ter does not exist on the 
printer used to list the pro- 
gram, but it does appear on 
the VDT screen and looks 
like the cursor, which, on 
my own terminal, is a solid- 
looking block that entirely 
fills one character position. 
Actually, this is an "in- 
verted period," but the dot 
representing the period is 
so small, it's almost invisi- 
ble. Several of these char- 
acters displayed together 
look like one long, con- 
tinuous cursor. Although 
entirely unnecessary, this 
little trick enhances the 
aesthetic quality of the 
display and emphasizes 
the particular data field be- 



0010 REH "HRHLFH* > HAM. RADIO.MOBILE. LOG .FILE. MAINTENANCE* 

DU20 BEGIN 

UObO Difl C$(6) ,NS(10) ,l*S(b] jKStJU) 

0Q70 Din S$(30, w -KFS(30 r -") 

0U&0 I0LIST CS,NS,F3,K5 

502 OPEN (2)*HRF2" 

1000 FEN 

lUiO PRINT 'CS' ,"HRMLFH" r | (10 t l) , "HAH RADIO MOBILE LOG FILE MAlNTENANC 

i0iotE H ,ers[),o) ,day 

103Q PRINT 'IF' m "LF* ,* CALL NAME TELEPHONE INTERESTS, ROBBIES, 
1030: h REMARKS" 

1O40: - 

1050 PRINT £(64,0) , w CONTR0t,-KeY5:"„ef6$ f n," I - CR* ,« [66 , 2 J , "II - 'NO 

1050; ' ",§(66,3) , "IV - ' END v m 

2 000 REM 

2 010 LET L"5 

20 20 PRINT G(G,5) ,'LD', »LD\ 'LD' , , LD , ,'LD\ 'LD' ,'LD\ ' LD ' , ' LD \ *LD ' , *L 

SOiOiB'^LD'j'LiT ^LD', ' LD ■ , 'LD' , 'LD'r'LO' , 'H><, , LD\ , RB* 

2100 PRINT £(0jLJ »F5 (1*6) , ■ "^Rfc', 

2110 INPUT 0(0, L) r CS 

2120 IF (C$» H EJ4D N )Ott(CTL*4](;OTO1>0UU 

21 iU IF (LEN(C$J*$}GOT0300G 

2140 IF (LEN(C$J>6KOTO2100 

2150 LET C$-C$U#LEN(C$)>+S${1, (b-'LEN{C$) J) 

216U GOTO 3000 

21fr*f RJJH •■ -*t* 

22UU PRINT «(7,L) ,F$(1,1G] ," ", 

2210 INPUT G (7,L) ,N$ 

2211 IF (CTL>1)OH(NS»' ,, *'')GOT06030 
22L5 IF ( K$» "DELETE* JGQT06 CU0 
2220 IF {LEN(N$)<U)COTO23Q0 

22 30 PRINT (7 r L) , 'RB* t 
224 GOTO 2 200 

2 2yy REM — _-. .__,„ 

2300 PRINT @{lfl'U ,F${1,8) , n m * 
2310 INPUT £ (lfl r LJ ,P$ 
2320 IF (LEN £P$] <y)GOTG24GO 
2330 PRINT 4(18,L) , 'fit*', 

23 4 GOTO 2 300 

2399 REM ~ --.-- — — — - — 

2400 PRINT H2S,L) *F5, 
2410 INPUT e(2a,L) ,R$ 

2420 TF (LEN{R$)<31)GOTO400Cl 
2430 PRINT e(2a,L) r *&&', 
2440 GOTO 2400 

3U0O REM — ~„ — 

3010 READ (2 t KEY-C$(l l 6KEiO« fe 220QJ IOi-80 
3020 GOTO 5000 

4000 REW : ' 

4010 WRITE (2,KEV-=CS (1 f $M IOL^SO 

4020 LET L-L + l 

4030 IF U<21)G0'TO21OO 

4040 GOTO 2010 

501Q PRINT !(0,L7,C5,e£7,L] ,NS,§ (16, L) ,P$ J &(2b,Lj , R$ 

5020 LET L-L+I 

5030 PRINT ${0 t L) r CS 

504 GOTO 2200 

GOGO REM - ■ — 

6010 REMOVE (2 ,KEY=CS,D0H»6Q20) 
6020 PRINT « f 60, L-1K "DELETED" , ( KB' 
6030 PRINT e(G,L) r 'CL' r 
604 GOTO 2100 

¥000' REM ■ — 

4010 CLOSE (2) 

9020 PRINT ' LF* , 'RB' ,"0O VOU WANT A NEW LISTING NOW? : ", 

9030 INPUT C$ 

9040 IF (C$-"¥e&*)Oft(CS-*¥ p )RUN"HRMLAL- 

9B00 PRINT 'LP*, 'RB' ^FINISHED**- - , 
9999 END 



Fig. 1. Program listing— file maintenance. 



87 



M 



OuJu 
QU2Q 
0030 

uQ3U 

QOBQ 
QSQO 
0*?Q 
ObiU 
OfrUU 
10UU 
1010 
iOJO 
1(J]J 
10<0 
1U40 

liuu 

2tlUU 

2ulu 

soao 
sulu 

5II2Q 

MOn 
Sill) 
il2u 
9130 

»04iO 

SHI 



REM ■HRWLAL".ilA>l 4 AADlO.PlC}fllUE.L0C*ALFHAB£TitAL.HSTlhrG i 
frEGlH 

YMNT 'CS' ,M»MLAi,*,IH2S,U}.'''HAM KADIO MOBILE LOC/LlST" i et7U,0) ,P 
AT 

IOLIST CS r US,Fy,HS 

OPEN {2)*Hftr2* 
OPEN \%\ m U 
LET N'KP»1 



PBtNT [SPFF' * *EPS*lie50TJ H03ILE CSO LIST ■,CAY, i LP* 
PRINT (S»* CALL NAMt TELEPHONE IMTEFE5T5 , HOB BEES , * FE* 

:AFKS PACE*,P 

LET L*I 

kEAO t2,EHD**b<JUHOL»b<. 

if ic$ri.J)OK$ii,iHAnca>t*piaiiTr5}" 

LET KS-C* 
LEI L*L»1.N** 

litcsitoofoagoa 

LET P-P*l 

GOTO 1000 

Pit BIT < M * LF " . ■ EF * , 'CUT* 

END 

frg. 2. Program listing— alphabetical listing. 



ing requested by the pro- 
gram. 

The first thing the pro- 
gram requests is a callsign. 
When a call is entered, the 
program verifies that the 
call does not exceed six 
characters in length (the 
maximum size defined for 
the keys in the data file). If 
too many characters are 
entered, the program re- 
jects the entry and re 
quests the callsign again. 
Each time a call is re- 



quested, the VDT audible 
"beep" signal is sounded 
by the RB command in- 
cluded in statement 2100 
RB means "Ring Bell/' and, 
even though that name 
came originally from the 
older teletypewriters 
which actually did have a 
bell inside, the name stuck 
and is used to indicate the 
"beep" signal used on most 
video-type terminals. 

I might mention, by the 
way, that, even though this 

PAGE 1 



U»B^i1_ 


ITJ MOBILE 


QSO L_X3T 02/13/" 




CALL 


NAME 


TELEPHONE 


REMARKS 




K5 ANN 


CMAffl.eS 




ROE- COWJTERS, (DP FORMS SLS) 


1 


K3 FOG 


Joe 


46-1-7S0S 


RAISES , R DF . ARL I ND TON RAD 1 CLUB 


Z 


K9 tHD 


DON 


292-4703 


TffSUR OF URSAER+4709 CARLYLE 


3 


KS 110 


TOM 




rrjREST HILL 


4 


K5 1IL 


KEN P1DOLIT 


271-3933 


NOVICE TEST, SAILPLANE OUNER 


5 


K5 JLB 


AL 




COPERflS COVg.TX 


t. 


K5 KGR 


MIKE DUSK* 


271-3624 


FLY 1ND. COMPUTERS 


7 


K5 RHZ 


CMAflLlE 


2^7-^210 


BMOP; 924-1649. DX- SS* RAC^S 


B 


K5 TER 


DON 


frfti-ff 


^OFFICE #) 


9 


KS YL 


RUTH 


267-0407 


T0M(KSYM* 


1M 


K5 VM 


TOn CHANCE 


247-0407 


RUTHiKSYL ) , EKHJASVJX- ARRL OFCW 


11 


N5 t)K 


DICK 




ARL 1 NG TON . { A A PI LOT > 


12 


W5 TE 


BCti 




EX-UBSTEA 


13 


N5 UN 


GARY 


&34-S413 


EK-K5BVJ, 0*> <TV STN> 


14 


W3 tUF 


BILL 




CONFEDERATE AIR FORCE 


IS 


W5 FL 


NGN 


490*0240 


DX. RACES, < DESIGN ENQRJ 


14 


W3 6ES 


ED 


247-4009 


ROF-NAVYMARS. RMT CTL AIRCRAFT 


17 


US HVF 


MACK 


S89-2' 


PDF. NflVVWRSr RACES, COFFEE 


10 


N5 JDL 


PAPPY 




OUNS QAK GROVE AIRPORT 


19 


US OFN 


EIU. 


926*31 1 3 


KC CLUB. RACES 


20 


US TAW 


ADRIAN 


293-0032 


COMPUTERS. ( BUILDER J 


21 


US fl 


BILL 


737-70*1 


FIELD DAY STN OF KC CLUB, RACES 


22 


US UXP 


EDDIE 


4Sl-tl<X> 


RACES OBCR. RDF. P-5I, ( INSUR] 


23 


U7 EWH 


JOEL 




COMPVTERSt 22/02. tMOSTEK^ 


24 


US BIB 


intiATUAU 




SAN ANTONIO. TX i (DATAPOINTJ 


2S 


we TIF 


KARL 


236-0773 


CONPUTEBS, 22/02 


24 


NA4 IXM 


"UOLF* 


204-9794 


OUNS A SCORPIQN-2. RACES, (FHPD? 


27 


WAS AMD 


ED 


429-0S9* 


NEIGHBOR, ARHYNARS 


20 


HAS JCO 


JEAM 


924-7990 


RACEfi.lO: OLUB TREASURER 


29 


MAS JFO 


JESSIE 


2A7-TJB* 


4RAILROADI 


30 


MAS rnj 


TRACT 


2*3-22TS 


RACES. (ELECTRONICS RETAILER! 


31 


WAS QP7 


DUDU 


499-3004 


HOUSTON. TX ICA CtJ-FUTERS) 


32 


HAS LIST 


FRED 




r ARLINGTON ELECTRONICS 1 


33 


MAS UVU 


DON 


B38-0275 


ROF. RACES. \ DEPUTY SHERRIF) 


34 


«5 CFG 


BILL 




CONPUTERS. OX. CANL ELECTRONICS J 


33 


UB5 DHR 


BETTV 


268" 2644 


RACES OFFICER. KC CLUB 


34 


UBS FIV 


JLHNT 




AGGIE 


37 


U6S FT.O 


CLAUDE 


*73-+400 


RACES- FlSNINGiUHJTNEYK SAILING 


30 


UBS FPJ 


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Fig. J. Sample run of the mobile QSO list 



program is intended for use 
with a video terminal, it 
will run on hard-copy ter- 
minals if the statements 
containing "F$" are simply 
removed. 

Automatic Mode Change 

When a valid callsign is 
entered [actually, any six 
characters will be ac- 
cepted), the program im- 
mediately checks the data 
file to see if that callsign 
had been entered previous- 
ly. If it is a new call, the 
next data field is "lit up" 
(or underscored, if your ter- 
minal uses the underscore 
character for a cursor) and 
a name can be entered The 
next field may be used for 
either a telephone number 
or city name, and the last 
field may be used for any 
comments you may want 
to remember about that 
particular operator. Each 
new line entered remains 
on the screen until 20 lines 
have been entered, at 
which time statement 2020 
sends 20 "Line Delete" (LD) 
commands to the VDT at 
row 0, line 5, causing the 
last 20 lines entered on the 
screen to be "scrolled" up 
and out of sight. This 
prevents the heading infor- 
mation at the top of the 
screen from being lost 
after the last line on the 
screen has been used, since 
most VDTs automatically 
scroll all the lines up one 
line each time the last line 
is used. 

The process continues 
until a call is entered that rs 
already "on file." When 
this happens, the informa- 
tion previously entered for 
that operator is displayed 
under the appropriate col- 
umn headings. The callsign 
is then displayed again on 
the next line down and the 
program requests some- 
thing to be entered in the 
"name" field. If the infor- 
mation displayed on the 
previous line is correct as 
is, you can simply press the 
"Control! I" key, and the 
computer will leave that 



record unchanged and re- 
quest another callsign, If 
your terminal doesn't have 
function keys, the program 
will accept a single asterisk 
(*) as the indication that 
the record displayed is not 
to be changed. If, however, 
you do wish to change any- 
thing in that record, simply 
reenter each of the three 
remaining data items as 
they appear in the line 
above, making the changes 
as desired. Upon receipt of 
the last item, the old 
record is replaced by the 
new information and 
another callsign is re- 
quested. Simple. 

If you wish to complete- 
ly delete any particular 
callsign from the file, just 
enter the callsign. When 
that record is found and 
displayed on the screen, 
enter the word "DELETE" 
in the name field. The pro- 
gram will remove that rec- 
ord completely from the 
data file and display the 
word "DELETED" by that 
line on the screen 
(statements 6000 through 
6040), and then request 
another callsign. 

Typing the word "END" 
(or hitting the "ControMV" 
key) when the program is 
requesting a callsign will 
terminate the file main- 
tenance program. Before it 
stops, however, it will ask if 
you want a new list to be 
printed immediately. If 
you enter "YE S" or "Y", the 
second program will be ex- 
ecuted automatically, sav- 
ing you the trouble of hav- 
ing to run it yourself. This 
allows you to enter several 
new contacts or make a 
few changes as convenient, 
without actually produc- 
ing a complete new listing 
each time you run the 
maintenance program, 

Printing the List 

The second program 
may be run separately 
whenever an updated 
listing is desired, as well as 
automatically at the end of 
the file maintenance pro* 



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gram. Having two separate 
programs keeps the 
amount of memory re- 
quired to a minimum. The 
listing program simply 
READs the previously de- 
scribed data file se- 
quentially by callsign (key) 
and prints the information 
stored in each record in a 
format I have tried and 
found to be most conve- 
nient to use while operat- 
ing mobile. As previously 
mentioned, each record is 
automatically stored in al- 
phanumeric sequence by 
the file management 
system. Thus, no separate 
sorting of the records is re- 
quired. Each record is read 
sequentially and printed in 
callsign order. 

It is possible (and actual- 
ly quite easy) to have the 
program rearrange each 
callsign in such a way that 
the sorting order is the 
same as that u§ed in the 
Callbook — that is P all calls 
in the same call area listed 
together. However, this 



method did not seem to 
have any advantage for the 
mobile operator who needs 
to locate a specific call 
quickly and easily. Al- 
though I would not want to 
see the Callbook listed this 
way, it does speed up the 
search if you include the 
call area in the prefix and 
keep all the Ks, Ws, WBs r 
etc., together in this kind of 
list, I also found that print- 
ing a space between the 
prefix and suffix of each 
callsign greatly improved 
the readability of the list. 
Still further improvement 
was obtained by leaving a 
blank line between each 
different prefix group. The 
listing program simply 
skips a line whenever there 
Is any difference between 
the first three characters of 
the next callsign to be 
printed and the first three 
characters of the last call- 
sign printed. The combina- 
tion of separating the pre- 
fixes and the suffixes and 
leaving a blank line be- 



tween each different group 
makes it extremely easy to 
locate a particular call 
quickly (assuming, of 
course, that the call is in 
the list). 

You will probably notice 
from the prefixes and some 
of the remarks in the sam- 
ple listing that it was com- 
piled from contacts in the 
Dallas-Fort Worth "metro 
plex" area. Certainly there 
are no restrictions on how 
the list is used. If I had 
been equipped to operate 
75 or 40 meter mobile, I 
think the list would have 
been even more valuable. 

There are always trade- 
offs to be considered when 
writing new programs. One 
touch of laziness must be 
admitted here. I did not 
bother to do any "process- 
ing" of the callsigns, ex- 
cept to ensure that none 
were longer than six char- 
acters in length. I also 
chose to manually enter a 
blank at the beginning of 
alii X 2 and 1 x 3 calls in 



order that those would be 
listed in the "proper" se- 
quence, This could have 
been taken care of by the 
program, but the extra pro- 
gram steps did not seem 
justified based on the fact 
that it is so simple and easy 
to just enter the blank 
when entering such a call. 
The listing program 
prints 50 calls on each 
page and puts a sequence 
number on each line down 
the right-hand side of the 
listing. Since the printer I 
use has the ability to pro- 
duce "Expanded Print" (E P) 
for any specified line, I 
used this feature to print 
the heading line at the top 
of each page, Each of the 
four data columns is 
labeled, of course, and 
each page is consecutively 
numbered, If you don't 
have a separate printer on 
your system, you can easily 
change the listing program 
to print the list on your ter- 
minal if it is the hard-copy 
type. ■ 




r 



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switching/timing/ monitoring functions of the system, tn 
addition, an optional private channel unit may be installed 
as an accessory It may be operated in either a repeat or 
duplex mode Priced under $850 from your dealer. 

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91 



Richard J. Lutz 
4802 Fifth A venue 
Pittsburgh PA J52I3 



Calcu-Trip 

a program for the open road 



Silence those questioners. 



Display 


Coc 


Line 




00 




01 


33 


02 


04 


03 


84 


04 


33 


05 


02 


06 


34 


07 


01 


08 


32 


09 


41 


10 


31 


11 


01 


12 


33 


13 


05 


14 


3A 


15 


06 


16 


31 


17 


01 


18 


51 


19 


33 


20 


05 


21 


34 


22 


04 


23 


34 


24 


00 


25 


51 


26 


34 


27 


05 


26 


81 


29 


33 


30 


07 


31 


24 


32 


01 


33 


-00 



Key 
Entry 

STO 

4 

R/S 

STO 
2 

RCL 
1 


H.MS- 

f 

H- 

STO 

5 

RCL 
6 
f 

STO 

5 

RCL 

4 

RCL 



RCL 

5 

STO 

7 

FIX 

1 
GTO00 



Comments 

KEY IN current odometer reading & KEY R/S, 

Stores current odo reading in R4 for use later in 

calculation. 

KEY IN current time in format HH.MMSS. 

Stores current time 

In R2. 

Recalls starting time and subtracts it from 

current time to determine time since trip 

began, still in format HH.MMSS. 

Converts time since trip began to 
decimal hours. 
Stores this in R5. 

Recalls accumulated time out 

from R6, 

converts it to decimal hours, and 

subtracts it from time 

since trip began. 

Stores active driving time 

in R5, 

Recalls current odo reading from R4 

and then 

recalls beginning odo reading from 

R0 and subtracts to get miles traveled. 

Recalls active driving time from R5 and 

divides it into miles traveled 

to derive mph average, 

This is STOred in R7 for later recall 

by hand if desired. 

Fixes one decimal place (but by modifying 

step 32, any number of places can be used). 

Returns program to beginning. 



jA 



At Start of Trip: 

A. STOre starting time in format HH.MMSS in R1. 

B. STOre base odometer reading in Rfl For cars with a trip odo, this can be left as 
00.00, or car's accumulated odo can be used. 

During Trip: 

C. If you want mph averages based only on driving time, add each rest stop in format 
HH.MMSS to R6. (RCL 6 f KEY IN latest time out, f, H.MS + , STO 6.) Ignore this step if 
you want overall average mph regardless of stops. 

D. To calculate current average mph, KEY IN current odo reading and punch R/S. Then 
KEY IN current time (HH.MMSS) and punch R^S again. OUTPUT will be average mph at- 
tained. 

92 



i i Y\ id you make good 
l^ timer 

"What route did you 
come?" 

"When did you start?" 

"How long did the trip 
take you?" 

"How fast did you 
drive?" 

The first half-dozen 
questions after every trip 
home have to do with the 
trip itself. If this has hap- 
pened to you, on trips 
home or anywhere else, 
you know that most of the 
curiosity can be satisfied 
with average miles-per- 
hour— and then you can get 
on to less mundane mat- 
ters. 

Here's a simple-minded 
program for your HP-55 
calculator, adaptable to 
other programmables r 
which will answer the ques- 
tions, RCL 7 provides the 
last calculated average 
mph, RCL 6 provides total 
accumulated rest stop 
time, RCL 1 helps you 
remember when you 
started, and R4 minus R0 
tells you the miles you've 
covered. 

The next time you arrive, 
you can walk in pre- 
pared—with calculator in 
hand. Better yet, hand your 
HP-55 to the curious and 
let them figure it out while 
you wash the trip off your 
face!B 



TRS-80*and PET Owners 
With the Yen for Bucks 

Could you use some extra money? Intrigued with the prospect of turning your hobby into a 
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and computing statistics for baseball and bowling leagues is mind boggling — just ask any league manager or 
secretary. And after he's through sputtering, tell him about your computer and the services you can provide, If he's 
like most league managers, you'll find yourself in business for yourself right on the spot! 






Bowling League 

Statistics System 

TRS-80* 16K— $24.95 

Bowling League Statistics System is a compre- 
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The most important thing to re- 
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Charging Up the WE-800 

- a convenient alternative 



External operation, internal charge. 



The Wilson WE-800 is a 
versatile, synthesized 
two meter FM portable 
transceiver. It operates 
from an external 13 8-volt 
source or internal nicad 
batteries with the mere flip 
of a switch on the rear 
apron. Unfortunately, 
there is no provision for 
charging the nicads while 
operating from external 
power. Anticipating that 
this would be a useful 
feature, I immediately 
went to the books to find a 
suitable constant-current 
charging circuit. 

Experiments were run us- 
ing a series current-limiting 
resistor while charging the 



nicads from a 13,8-volt reg- 
ulated power supply. Var- 
ious resistances ranging 
from 10 to 36 Ohms were 
tried, but in every case the 
starting current was either 
much too high [100 mA 
plus) or it dropped off 
rapidly to well under 50 
mA within the 16-hour 
charging period. (My GE 
nicads specify a charging 
rate of 40-50 m A for 16 
hours.) Experiments with 
various pilot lamps in 
place of the resistor yield- 
ed much less variation be- 
tween the starting and 
fully-charged currents. 
Either a 47 or a 1847 bulb 
(6.3 V, 150 mA) produced 



— #r on 
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F ■ rCRNAL 
POWEfl 



POWER AMP 



Fig. 1. The new circuit is shown in bold. 



charging currents in the 

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rate during the experimen- 
tal period. 

Fig. 1 shows the final 
charging circuit. The 
1 N4003 diode prevents cur- 
rent flow from the nicads 
to the external power 
source. The dial light on- 
off switch is used also to 
turn the internal charging 
circuit on and off. Just 
remove the existing wires 
from one side of this 
switch and use that side to 
control the charging func- 
tion, Nicad memory dic- 
tates that the batteries 
should be fully discharged 
before full recharging, and 
this switch allows con- 
trolled charging. With the 
circuitry shown, the nicads 
charge if the charge switch 
is on, even if the rig's 
power switch is turned off. 
When the power switch is 
turned off, the nicad charg- 
ing current can be read 
directly with a milliam- 
meter in line to the exter- 
nal power socket. 

The charging current to 
discharged nicads starts at 
approximately 75 mA and 



drops slowly to approx- 
imately 50 m A over four 
hours. This rate holds for 
the remaining 12 hours. 
Very similar results are ob- 
tained in the car. but there 
is reduced charging current 
until the engine and alter- 
nator are running. This is 
because the charging cur- 
rent is determined by the 
relative voltage of the 
charger and chargee. 

Incidentally, the Wilson 
WE-800 Owner's Manual 
does not contain a caution 
against charging the nicads 
directly from a regulated 
power supply, and it prol> 
ably should. A charging 
current well in excess of 
1 50 mA was measured with 
this direct hookup. 

With the modified 
WE-800, I can operate two 
meters at home or in the 
car while the nicads are 
simultaneously charging. 
With a little imagination, 
similar circuitry could be 
installed in almost any 
nicad-equipped rig. ■ 

References 

Arvid G. Evans K7HKL, 
"Regulated Nicad Charger," 73 
Magazine, June, 1977, p. 117. 
Hank Olson W6GXN, "Battery 
Chargers Exposed," 73 
Magazine, November, 1976, p. 
98, 

The Radio Amateur's Hand- 
book, 1978 edition, p. 134. 



94 




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95 



Weils R, Chapin W8G1 
507 Franklin 
Kin&ley MI 49649 



Where Have All the kHz Gone? 

— are ham bands an endangered species? 



Prophets of doom vs. masters of deceit. 



Paradise lost; that could 
be the story of our 
beloved old 40 meter band. 
What fun we had! If we 
wanted to work Australia, 
we looked from 8000 to 
9000 kHz, Europe was from 
6000 to 7000 kHz, and the 
USA hams had 7000 to 
8000 kHz exclusively to 
roam around in, We never 
heard of intruders, and all 
was beer and skittles until 
the ARRL started to "pre- 
serve" our bands. 

Let's take a graphic look 
(Figs. 1 and 2) at our work- 
horse bands that were ad- 
mittedly preserved by the 



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VIGOROUS SHARING 

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ARRL. They very gracious- 
ly (and with great publicity) 
provided the sum of 
$100,000 to protect bands 
that were worth a king's 
ransom, bands so valuable 
even today that you can- 
not put a price on them. 

Pretty gruesome, isn't it? 
But that 'ain't ' the total 
story. When shortwave sta- 
tions began to appear in 
our bands, our vigilant 
ARRL, with great poise and 
indignation, coined the 
word "intruder" and 
established the intruder 
watch. The purpose of this 
is to enable you to let off 
steam and have you think 
that something is being 
done about the problem 
This intruder watch is a real 
exercise in frustration. So 
you report them, and years 
later they are still going 
merrily on their way. You 
know why? Because no one 
ever objected at the proper 
time to their being there. 
International law says that 
these frequencies are re- 
quested from and assigned 
in Geneva and p after as- 
signment other countries 
have a year to object to the 
allocation before it is final 
and the station goes on the 



jj-nruL^ 



/979 



air After the station is on 
the air, it's too late. 

This intruder thing may 
break our backs at WARC 
79. Believe it or not, the 
dear broadcasters are now 
looking at as as intruders 
and want to throw us out! 
The extent of the intruders 
on 40 meters at night is hor- 
rendous and is rendering 
the band useless. Now you 
are begin ing to see them 
appear in daylight. At 
night, 40 is one mass of 
heterodynes and signals. 

Have you ever wondered 
just how many stations are 
in there? World Radio and 
TV lists 414 stations all 
within 7000 to 7300 kHz 
There are powers listed 
from 10 kW to 250 kW. 
Ninety percent of the 
powers are listed as 100 
kW, 8% are listed as 250 
kW r and 2% are over 50 
kW. The Voice of America 
has 40 stations in this band, 
with powers of 100 kW to 
250 kW. It's no wonder we 
hear a raft of. intruders! 

Our USA broadcasters 
took 100 kHz of our 160 
meter band, and recent 
events indicate that they 
are going after more of this 
band. Other bands have 



gradually disappeared. 
Ham radio has been, and is, 
being piecemealed to 
death, After each WARC 
(and between some), we 
lose kilohertz and priv- 
ileges. We are forced to 
develop new technology to 
cram more and more of us 
into a smaller and smaller 
space. It won't be long 
before we will have to 
develop "negative fre- 
quency." It's sad, and a sad 
commentary on our ability 
to preserve our bands. 

Our dear ARRL writers 
have labeled men like me 
"prophets of doom/' I have 
a name for them: "masters 
of deceit.'B 



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If there is one place in your station where you cannot risk uncertain results 
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The Palomar Engineers R-X Noise Bridge tells you if your antenna is 
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NEWFT-7B100W 
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Sensitivity: O.SuV for S/N 20 dB 
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typical 
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Spurious emission: Better than -40 dB 
Distortion products: Better than -31 dB 



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ESU FLECTRONICS Eastern Service Ctr.. 981 2 Princeton-GJendale Rd.. Cincinnati, OH 45246 



The Ramsey 2m Amp Kit 

has a high Watts-per-dollar ratio 



Compete with the big guns. 



Ttm Darnel NBHK 
7 Peabody Drive 
Oxford OH 45056 

A few weeks of operat- 
ing a Drake TR-22C 
convinced me that it was a 
good rig, but the 1 Vi-Watt 
output just did not do the 
job. Unless you live next 
door to the repeater, your 
signal needs some kind of 
boost. For me. this booster 
had to meet the following 
requirements: 

1) Low cost— leaving 

me enough money for an- 
other project. 

2) Easy to construct- 



no tricky circuits or odd- 
ball parts. 

3) Portability — usable 
at home, mobile, and in the 
field, 

4) Adaptability — hav- 
ing other possible applica 
tions. 

The portability require- 
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na scheme. While an am- 
plifier seemed to be the on- 
ly option left, a quick 
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showed that such units are 
available, but the prices 
just didn't agree with my 
tight budget, and the fact 
that my workbench was 
already cluttered with 
several unfinished proj- 



A- 



—-/ 



OUT 




1 



ects ruled out home- 
brewing. 

One day, as I was scan- 
ning the ads in my favorite 
magazine {73, of course), I 
saw it: the Ramsey Elec- 
tronics PA-1. It's a two 
meter power amp kit which 
features 8 Watts out for 
one in, and as much as thir- 
ty out for four Watts in. 
The best part was the price. 
At $22.95, it looked like a 
real bargain, It looked too 
good to be true, however, 
so instead of running out 
and buying it, I promptly 
forgot about it. 

A few months later, at 



LOOP 



Z2H 

W W 



nw* 



;iM9l4 



the Wheaton, Illinois, 
hamfest, the Ramsey peo- 
ple had a sample PA*1 on 
display. At first I thought it 
wouldn't work — it was just 
too simple. However, the 
reduced hamfest price got 
rid of any fears I had left, 
and I bought it 

The heart of the ampli- 
fier is a Motorola VHF 
power amplifier transistor. 
Its hefty construction con- 
vinced me it could easily 
handle the claimed thirty 
Watts if properly heat- 
sinked. Class C operation 
is used, so, the unit is 
suitable for either CW or 



+ *BV 




01 

[NOT CRITICAL, 
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Fig, 7. A DPDT toggle switch or relay (see Fig, 21 



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100 



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San Fernando Electronics 

Zenith Distributing Corp, 

United Radio $ TV Supply 

Mid- State Electronic Supply 

Quality Electronics 

Santa Crur Electronics 

Caps Electronics 

Mission Control 

Byte Shop 

Sunnyvale Electronics 

2ack it 

MicroSun Computer Center 

Corn Co Electronics 
Tfte Computer Shop 

Heathkit Electrons Eeflt&t 
Bridgeport Computer 

Delaware Amateur Supply 

Cornpittvrs For You 
Hniitfikft Electronic Center 

At/ante Computer Man 
Radio Wholesale 

Integrated Circuit Supply 

Audtotronics 

Tn State Electronic Corp. 
Mayer Electronics 
Tn-State Electronic Corp 



Continued f 

SpectfQriiCf 

Computer Store of Rock ford 
Data Domain 



Aero Electronics Corp. 
Hutch % Son Inc. 

Elect* on™ Limited 



ILLINOIS 
Oaf: Park 

Rock ft?rct 

Se&aumburg 
INDIANA 
East Chicago 

IOWA 

Indianofa 

KANSAS 

Vl/tchitu AftiMMiii Radio Equipment Company 

KENTUCKY 

Lexington Radio -Electronic Equipment Co, 

LOUISIANA 

8a ton Rouge 

Houma 

Mesarie 

MARYLAND 

Anna/tola 

Baltimo rg 

QjUrtiftviffQ 

DtrnitCt/S 

La Vale 

Rockviite 

ftocAyffl* 

Towson 

To wson 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Ptiabosly 

PfttsffetCt 

Walsham 

Wellesiey 

Worcuster 

MICHIGAN 

Ann Arbor 

Ann Arbor 

O'awion 

D«trait 

£a\&r Lafi&mg 

Flir\ t 

Garden Ow 

Grand Rapids 

L,ansing 

Lansing 

L ivon ia 

Livonia 

Midfnnd 

Mia 

Oak Park 

Sterling Heights 

MINNESOTA 

Duluth 

Nopktns 

St. Paul 



P$tican Elect f Q» jes 
Pefjcan Einttt/otUci 
Pelican Electron^ 

J & M Electronics 

Harco of Baltimore 

Churchvifle Electronics 

Damascus CB 

J & M Electronics 

Computer Workshop 

Hratfiitit Electronic Center 

foiyt>t;$\ttHe Electronics inc. 

Heathktt Etectrvnic Cermet 

HSathkit Electronic Center 
Pitts field Radio Co. inc. 

Computer Murt fnc. 
Heaihkit Electronic Center 

RM EfectroniCi Inc. 



Eric Electronics 

Wedemeyer Electronic Supply 

Radio Supply & Engineering 

Hvathktt Electronic Center 

Eric Eiectrontcs 

Hobby Electronic Confer 

Computet Center 

R^tJ/O Par tt Inc. 

Fulton Radio Supply C&. 

vYedemeye/ Electronic Supply 

Eric Electronics 

ftadio Supply & Engineering 

Computroniji Corp. 

fifilvt RatftO Supply 

Erie Electronics 

EttC El^CtrOPiCS 

Northwest Radio of Dulusti 
Heathkri Eiecsrosut: Supply 
Heathkit Electronic Supply 



MISSOURI 

El Dorado Springs 

MONTANA 

Billings 

Bo/L'itiilfi 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 

On-i&ha 

Qniaha 

NEVADA 

Las Vagjii- 

N£lfl JERSEY 

Brick to wn 

Cherry Hiff 

OCfan 

Pompton Lake 

R&riHQ y 

NEW MEXICO 

Las Cruces 

NEW YORK 

Endwelf 

Jericho 

Kingston 

New York 

North White Plains 

Rochester 

Troy 

Ultca 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Boone 

Durham 

GrQanshnro 

Raleigh 

NORTH DAKOTA 

fargo 

OHIO 

Bucyrut 

Cincinnati 

Columbus 

Reynold'sbutg 

Youngstown 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma City 

OREGON 

Albany 

Cpoi Bay 

Ponland 

Salem 



Bee kn'ian Etuctran ics 

Conley Radio Supply 
Electronic Seri/icn & Dist. 

Attair Computer Center 

Scott Electronic Supply Inc. 

Hdatfokit Electronic Center 

Omaha Computer Store 

CentUty 23 

Radio Shack Associate Store 

The Computer Emporium 

Heathkit Elcttrvriit Center 

Computer Center of NJ. 

Typetmnic Computer Stom 

Mamues Electronic Supply 

Computer Tree Inc, 

Heathkit Electronic Center 

tjreyfock Electromci 

Computer Mart of New York 

t-feashkit Electronic Center 

Haathkit Electronic Center 

Trojan Electronics 

Aui-Corr\ EltrCtrprn'Cf 



Alpha Digital Systems 

Futureworld 

Byte Shop 

SytH Shop of Raini§n 

The Computer Company 

Mead Electronics 

Heathkit Electronic Center 

Heathkit Electronic Center 

Universal Amareur Radio 

Ross Radio Company 

Bits, ByttH * MtCfOi 

Oregon Hani Sales 

Herrick Electronics 

Portland Radio Supply 

Compute Pathway* 



RHODE ISLAND 

Cram ton 

Pawtuckat 

Warwick 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 

Clark.svif/c 

Gookevilftt 

KnoMritle 

Na$h villa 

TEXAS 

AmAfftSc 

Dallas 

Hotftton 

Houston 

San Antrimo 

UTAH 

Midv&le 

Prow 

VIRGINIA 

A le* andria 

Alexandria 

Blacksburg 

Chario ttesviile 

Fails Church 

Hampton 

fttcrfafft 

Richmond 

Roanoke 

Virginia Bead' 

WASHINGTON 

Long¥f£iv 

Mo&ef Lake 

Pasco 

Seattle 

Startle 

Seattle 

Spokane 

TaComa 

WEST VIRGINIA 

MoigiiiitOWfi 

WheMmg 

WISCONSIN 

Wen Altis 



Jabbour Electronics City 

Jabbour Electronics City 

Hea th kit Electronic Cen ter 

William's Data Comp Div. 

IvtastitroniCs 

Wagnon 's Stereo Cerrtor 

Eastern Micro 

Etectra Distributing Co. 

Computer Encounters Inc. 

CompuShop 

ContpvShop 

ttltWKtiVti Computers 

Shermatt Eiecs/onics Supply Inc. 

Heathkit Electronic Center 
Alpine Electronic Supply Co. 



Computer Hardware Store 

Heathkit Electronic Cvnter 

Scotty s Radio & TV int. 

Graves Etectronie* 

Crossroad EtvClrontCs 

Lafayette Radio 

Au#c Electronic* Corp, 

Avec Electronrci Corp. 

The Computer Place 

Heathkit Electronic Center 

Progress Electronics 

Ron 's Electronics 

Riverrieuj Eftcimnits 

Amateur RvdfO Supply 

C-Com 

Empire Electronics 

Personal CoXipvtvrs 

C8t G Electronic 

Electro Distributing Co. 
Lafayette Radio 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Drums tyfr. d 's Digital Electronics 

Htirtliriy Microcomputer Systems tnc. 

Phtf&detphiP Heeshk\i Electronic Center 

Pittsburgh Heathkit Electronic Center 

York G.Y.C Company 



CANADA 

Alberta {Calgary 1 

Ontano {VJttlvwdahj 

Quebec (Montreal! 

ENGLAND 

Berkshire 

GUAM 

PANAMA 

Panama City 

SINGAPORE 



Olson Electronics 



The Computer Store 

Hom# Computer C*"'n-' 

Wang f s Microcen ter 

ftlewBear Computing Store 
Marianas Electronics 

Sonitef. S.A. 
In Htr: trade- fPTE) Ltd. 



ASK YOUR ELECTRONICS STORE TO STOCK JIM-PAK® TODAY!! 
1021 HOWARD AVENUE, SAN CAR LOS, CALIFORNIA 94070 • (415)592-8097 



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INTEGRATED CIRCUITS MICROPROCESSOR LED'S SOCKETS CAPACITORS DIODES TRANSISTORS RESISTORS POTENTIOMETERS 



v* Resder Service— see page 195 



101 



FM operation. This also 
allows power consumption 
to drop to zero when 
receiving, so that battery 
life is extended in portable 
operation. Its wide input^ 
to-output range makes it 
great for hooking up to rigs 
with different power out- 
put levels. Trimmer capaci- 
tors and a choke keep the 
unit running clean 

The instruction sheet 
takes onlv a few minutes to 
read. It is clear and to the 
point, Construction took 
me only two hours, but it 
could be done easily in half 
that time by a determined 
worker The best part was 
the coil winding — it was 
over in less than five 
minutes. Soldering the 
transistor is the only 
critical step, and it is done 
last, so you have plenty of 
practice. I used plenty of 
heat-sink goop and made 
sure it was securely fas- 
tened to the chassis. The 
circuit board was the best 



I've seen in any kit; solder 
flowed on it with no prob- 
lem. All parts were tack 
soldered to one side of the 
board, so it helped to use 
plenty of heat. 

Tune-up was as easy as 

construction, A wattmeter 
or some other measuring 
device is needed. The trim- 
mers are adjusted for max- 
imum output and the am- 
plifier is ready to go on the 
air. A check with a Bird 
wattmeter showed the am- 
plifier output to be greater 
than nine Watts when 
driven by my TR-22C The 
gain at that level is 8 9 dB f 
very close to the transistor 
spec-sheet 9-dB rating Cur- 
rent drain was 1 .2 
Amperes, so efficiency was 
about 65%. 

The kit comes with a cir- 
cuit board and all the parts 
that go on it. No hardware, 
connectors, case, or 
switching circuitry are in* 
eluded. These can be ob- 
tained easily at an elec- 



tronics supermarket if you 
don't already have them in 
your junk box. 1 bought a 
5,25 x 3 x 2-inch aluminum 
minibox to house the cir- 
cuit board and act as a 
heat sink. It is a bit larger 
than the board, so 1 have 
room for a receiver 
preamplifier or other addi- 
tions at a later date. 
S0239 connectors are 
mounted on either end of 
the box. I used the single- 
mounting-hole type, since 
they require less hardware 
and chassis work. 

The instruction sheet in- 
cludes a schematic for a 
T-R switching circuit A 
DPDT relay is driven by a 
two-transistor sensing cir- 
cuit. Since my junk box 
didn't have a relay that 
works on 12 volts, I decid- 
ed to use a toggle switch in- 
stead. This simple ap- 
proach, shown in Fig. 1, 
works well despite the in- 
convenience of having to 
flip a switch after every 



transmission. Later I was 
able to replace this cheap- 
skate approach with a re- 
lay purchased from a sur- 
plus vendor. I simplified 
the suggested rf-sensing 
and relay-driver circuit by 
eliminating a transistor, 
two resistors, and a capaci- 
tor, A short length of 
hookup wire looped 
around the input line pro- 
vides plenty of drive, The 
result, shown in Fig. 2, was 
wired on a small piece of 
perfboard which is glued to 
the relay case. 



Someday my PA-1 
serve a second purpose as 
part of a simple exciter for 
OSCAR use The PA-1 is 
one of several kits by 
Ramsey which I have built. 
All of them have met my 
expectations. The PA-1 has 
proven to be a real help in 
bringing up repeaters and 
in greatly improving my 
simplex range. Thanks to 
the PA-1, I can now com- 
pete with the big guns.B 



Photo by W3GAT 




Ramsey Electronics' 30-Watt two meter power amplifier. 



102 



Vj MFJ ENTERPRISES. fNC 1979 



NEW MFJ-981 3 KW Versa Tuner IV 

For $199.95 you can run up to 3 KW PEP and match everything from 
1.8 thru 30 MHz: coax, balanced lines, random wires. Built-in balun, 
SWR, dual-range forward and reflected power meter. 

Built*in balun, SWR f 
dual-range forward and 
reflected power meter. 





The NEW MFJ-981 3 KW Versa Tuner IV lets 
you run up to 3 KW PEP and match any feedline 
continuousl y 1rom 1 .0 to 30 MHz: coax, balanced 
line or random wire. 

This gives you maximum power transfer to 
your antenna for solid OSO's and attenuates har 
monies to reduce TVI and out- o1- band emission. 

An accurate meter gives SWR, forward, reflect 
ed power in 2 ranges (2000 and 200 watts). 

A new all metal, low profile cabinet gives you 
RFI protection, rigid construction, and sleek styling. 



Black finish. Rich anodized aluminum front panel. 
5x14x14 inches. A flip down wire stand lifts 
tuner for easy viewing. 

Efficient, encapsulated 4:1 fertile balun. 500 
pf, 6000 volt capacitors, 18 position dual inductor; 
17 amp, 3000 volt ceramic rotary switch. 2% 
meter, SO- 239 coax connectors, ceramic feedthru 
for random wire and balanced line. Binding post 
for ground. 

Every single unit is tested for performance and 
inspected for quality. Solid American construction, 



quality components. Full one year limited warranty. 

For your nearest MFJ dealer, call toll free 
800 647 1800. Stop by your dealer. Compare it 
feature for feature with other tuners, Compare its 
value, its quality and its performance. 

After a truly side by side comparison, you'll 
be convinced that its value, quality and features 
make it a truly outstanding value. 

Why not visit your dealer today and see the 
NEW MFJ-981 3 KW Versa Tuner IV? If no 
dealer is available order direct from MFJ. 



MFJ-982 3 KW VERSA TUNER IV has balun, 7 position antenna switch. Matches every 
thing: coax, balanced lines, random wires continuously from 1.8 to 30 MHz. 

Flexible 7 position antenna switch lets you 
select 1 coax thru tuner and 2 coax thru tuner 
or direct, or random wire and balanced line. 

Up to 3 KW PEP, Match any feedline from 1.8 
to 30 MHz: coax, random wire, balanced line. 

Gives maximum power transfer. Harmonic at- 
tenuation reduces TVI. out of band emissions. 

Black metal cabinet, anodized aluminum front 
panel. Flip down wire stand. 5x14x14 in. 

Encapsulated 4:1 ferrite balun. 500 pf, 6000 
volt capacitors, 18 position dual inductor. 17 amp 




* 7 position 
antenna switch 

• 4.-T ferrite balun 
for balanced 

fines 

ceramic switches. SO 239 coax connectors, 
ceramic feedthru for random wire, balanced fine, 
binding post for ground. 

Made in USA. One year limited warranty. 

See it al your nearest dealer. It no dealer is 
available order direct from MFJ. 




If you already have a SWRfwattmeter, the 
MFJ-982 is for you. 



MFJ-980 3 KW VERSA TUNER IV has built-in balun for balanced lines. Matches coax, 
balanced lines, random wires, 1.8 to 30 MHz. 



Up 10 3 KW PEP S Match any feedline from 1.8 
to 30 MHz: coax, random wire, balanced fine. 
Heavy duty encapsulated 4:1 ferrite balun. 

Gives maximum power transfer. Harmonic at- 
tenuation reduces TVI, out of band emissions. 

Black metal cabinet, anodized aluminum front 
panel Flip down wire stand. 5x14x14 in. 

500 pf, 6000 volt cap., 18 position dual indue 



* Encapsulated 4:1 
ferrite balun for 
balanced lines 



$ 169 



95 



tor, 1 7 amp ceramic switches. 
Made in USA, One year limited warranty. 
See it at your nearest dealer. If no dealer is 

available order direct from MFJ. 




This is MFJ's lowest priced 3 KW Versa 
Tuner IV. 



FOR YOUR NEAREST DEALER OR FOR ORDERS 

CALL TOLL-FREE SOO-647- 1 800 



Order any product from MFJ and try it. If not delighted, return within 30 days for a prompt refund (less shipping), ^ M52 
Order today. Money back if not delighted. One year limited warranty. Add $8.00 shipping/handling. 

For technical Information, order/repair status, In Mississippi, outside continental USA, call 601 -323-5869. 




master charge 



Order By Mail or Call TOLL FREE 800-647-1800 and Charge It On 

MFJ ENTERPRISES^ INC- Mississippi state, Mississippi 39762 

p<* Reader Service— see page 195 103 



from Fle/her 



computerized games 
that challenge YOU 1 



ra**n<** r Z 



TR-128 

*RTTY Regenerative 
Speed Converter 



TTL compatible connections for direct hook-up to the 
Flesher TU-170, also adaptable to other terminal 
units. 



• 60,87, 75 P 100WPM and 110 BAUD 
ASCII 

• Stable crystal -control led oscillator 

• 128 Character storage capacity 
with storage status mater to show 
buffer till 

• Pre-loads and repeats up to 12B 
characters 



Please add $3 far shipping and handling 
Prices good thru June 30 fc 1979 



■ Has continuously variable charac- 
ter rate 

• Low power CMOS circuitry 

• One-board (total circuitry) con- 
struction 

• Power requirement; 115V 60Hz, 5W 



TR-128 TR*f28 

Kit $169.95 Wired $239.95 



- »1 ■> 



CHESS CHALLENGER ■ "ID 

The world's most popular 

computerized chess game. Ten 
levels of playing difficulty from 
beginner to expert. Chess 
Challenger^" 10" invites chess 
players to learn, improve and 
match their skills against a 
computer's mind. 



CHECKER CHALLENGER * "-4" 

Meet Checker Challenger*' 1 '^ 1 

with four levels of playing 

difficulty. This challenger 

invites you to sharpen your 

skills, improve your game and 

play whenever you want. 



MEINKEN DISTRIBUTION 

1331 H. Kildare Ave- Chicago. 1llinai£&0639 



OTY 



master charge 



Flesher products . , , the critics choice! 

Flesher cor p. 



DESCRIPTION 



Checker Challenger h "4 



Checker Challenger* "2" 



Chess Challenger" "7" 



Chess Challenger 1 L '1Q" 



VoiceChess ChallBnger r 



8acKgammon Challenger* 



Bridge Challenger 1 



Tax WE PAY POSTAGE 



SENDCHECK OR MONEY ORDER | 


PRICE EACH 


TOTAL 


$1 25.00 




4995 


p 


99.95 




1B9.00 




299.00 



mw 



P.O, Box 976, Topeka, Kansas 66601 (913) 234-0198 



ill. Res. Add 5% Tax we pay i 

Narne.. : 

Address 

Cily State 

EH SEND ME FREE BROCHURE 



99 .9 S 



315.50 



TAX 
TOTAL 



ff*»* 



itntlltttiiti n iHifHi it tilt* ?«*« H httamiWW W*>t 

tiititttift? 

ttttlliittfl 



Since my XYL 
discovered G.I.S 








■^Sc 



K* Z 



U- 



* * m * 



###*♦• 



I can't get her out 
of the shack." 



YAESU'S FT-T01ZD 



Yaesu's FT-101ZD series now at 
G.I.S.M.O. Variable bandwidth, 
built-in digital plus analog readout, 
full coverage, clean output signal, 
WORLD WIDE POWER CAPABIL- 
ITY. Interface with 901 series 
components. Call now! 



blame her, though. My XYL 
Tarleton for Yaesu, Kenwood 
her out of the shack. 



Not long ago, my XYL got her licence. Thought 
we'd spend more time together if we shared the 
fun. Then it happened— she discovered G.I.S.M.O.'s 
toll-free line! Pretty soon she was getting quotes 
on gear by Kenwood, Icom, Dentron, Ten-Tec and 
Yaesu and more. Bought that pretty FT-101ZD. 
Now she's taken over the shack! And the tele- 
phone's always tied up because she can't resist 
phoning G.I.S.M.O. to talk trade. Can't really 
always did have a nose for bargains. Call up Lane 
and more. But don't tell your XYL-you'll never get 



_ ^^ ^^ _ I n S C rail 1 -Tfi^ 7 "I R7 

G.I.S.M.O. 1-800-845-6183 2305 Chcrfv Roadi Rock H " s c 



29730 (Exit 66-B off I-77) 



104 



v* Reader Service— see page 195 



A Breakthrough In Technology! 

MICROPROCESSOR CONTROLLED 
SYNTHESIZED HANDIE 



FT-207R 



YAESU 



4 Memories plus 
Programmable Offset 



BNC Antenna 
Connector 



Squelch Control 



Audio Gain 
Control 



Condenser Mike 



5-Digit LED 

Readout 



Keyboard Encoded 
Frequency Entry 

Keyboard Lock 
guards against 
accidental frequency 
change 



144-148 MHz Range 
3 Watts Output 



Memory and 
Band Auto Scan 



Automatic Battery Saver 
Feature for LED Display 

Priority Channel 
Rubber Flex Antenna 



Clear /Busy Auto 
Scan Selector 

Repeater/Simplex 
Offset Switch 




Remote 

Speaker 'Mike 
Input 



Channel 
Busy Lamp 

Transmit 

Indicator 



Display 
On /Off 



5 KHz Up 



Optional Equipment: 

Tone Squelch, Speaker/Mike, Nicads, Battery Charger 

The taesu FT-207R Synthesized Handle 
has all the features you could want in a ¥ery compact package 



***T44 



TOWER ELECTRONICS 

24001 Alicia Pky. r Mission Viejo, CA 92691 

(714) 768-8900 

The Southwest' s full-line Yaesu Distributor 




TERMINAL 
UNIT 



Connect to your receiver speaker, transmitter 
microphone jack, and teletype machine and you're on 
the air. State of the art design features make the 
TU-170 ideal for HF and VHF auto start operation. 



• Proved t?0 Hz shift active mter 
demodulator 

• Lighted tuning meter for easy tun- 
ing 

• Current regulated loop keyer & 
power supply 

• Autostat with threshold control and 
solid state relay 

Pfease add |3 for shipping and handling 
Prices good thru June 30, 1979 



Ftesher products 



Stable audio frequency shift 

oscillator produces phase coherent 

sine wave tones 

TTL compatible inputs and outputs 

for auxiliary equipment 

High level output for scope tuning 



TU-170 TU-170 

Kit 149.95 Wired 219.95 



the critics choice! 



master chary* 1 



Flesheb CORP 



*>" FS 



WS4* 



P.O. Box 976, Topeka, Kansas 66601 (913> 234-0198 



END PAPER POLLUTION f 




in Office, Home, Lab, Workshop 



HANDY, HUSKY, HEAVYDUTY 

SHELF FILES 



KEEP MAGAZINES, CATALOGS, 
MANUALS, JOURNALS, PLANS 

NEAT and FULLY 
ORGANIZED! r 



Eliminate the mess of loose magazines, 
newspapers, catalogs, etc. in office, lab, 
workshop. Find what you want when you 
want it by using these handy shelf or desk 
files. Ends personal paper pollution prob- 
lems once and for all! Adhesive ID labels 
included. Letter size: 9" X 11 Vi X 3W\ 
Use credit card to order. Mail coupon be- 
low. Satisfaction guaranteed. 



Professional Aids Co., Suite 000 ^pjt 
I 1 S. Wacker Dr., Chicago, IK, 60606 ^ 

Please rush postpaid Fi ber board Desk and Sheff FHes as checked below 

— r 




How Many 



Qty 



6 



25 



Size 



Utter Size 



Letter Size 



Price 



512 95 



28 97 



Total Price 



D Check for Free 
Catalog 

□ 
enclose $ 



□ Charge it (o ' Visa G Mastercharge 

Acct. No.. 

Name 



TOTAL: 



lull payment Ship 
ppd_ 

LI Bill Company 

We are rated . 



Exp Date- 



Add re &s 



City/ State / Zip . 

Illinois Residents add 5% Sales Tax. please Other sizes from digest to newspaper available 



p* Reader Service — see page 796 



105 






COAXPROBE® 



ONLY 

$9*93 




COAXIAL RF PROBE FOR 

FREQUENCY COUNTERS 

AND OSCILLOSCOPES 



•MONITOR YOUR SIGNAL DIRECTLY 

FROM THE COAX LINE 
*5*2MD WATTS PEP 
'OUTPUT: .31v-1.lv RMS 1-100 WATTS 
♦INSERTION LOSS LESS THAN 

.2db (3-30 Mhz.) 
'USEFUL RANGE; ,1 to ISO Mhz, 

Eliminate jerry-rigging when you need to 
monitor your signal. The CoaxProbe* 
will work on both frequency counters and 
oscilloscopes (of proper bandwidth). 
Just connect the probe into your coax line 
and hook up your test equipment. 
Because of its low loss, you can leave 
it in while you operate! 



LYTL-LOAD® 



ONLY 

$8.95 




NEW! 




" ' ■ tm m*m 




30 WATT DUMMY LOAD 
FOR QRP AND 2-METERS 



Now! A dummy load that's just the 
right size for low power work. Rated 
at 30 watts for 30 seconds, the Lytl- 
load® is perfect for Qrp work, 
2-meters or any application where 
low power and small size are re- 
quired. The LythLoad® has a range 
to 1 50 Mhz with SWR of 1 .4:1 at 150 
Mhz and 1.1:1 at 30 Mhz. 



All Eagle products carry a 10 day. 
money back (minus shipping) guar- 
antee. Please add 51 per order for ship- 
ping, 



ORDER TODAY FROM: 

EAGLE ELECTRONICS 

Box 426 
Portage, Mi 49081 

LOCATED AT 4475 W. MILHAM ROAD 



JUST GETTING ON THE AIR? 

See Adirondack for 



Jo 



rfH*5 



D New Equipment 

□ Used Gear 

D Friendly Advice 



Supply 

185-191 West Main Street * P.O Box 88 
Amsterdam, N.Y 12010 Tel (518)842*8350 
Just 5 minutes from N + Y + Thruway- Exit 27 



Aluminum towers are not 
usually as strong as steel 
towers — ask for engineering 

- 

facts before purchasing any 
tower. Aluminum towers, in 
most cases, are one-half as 
strong as steel towers within 
the same price range. 



Notice Paid For By Unarco-Rohn 



^U2 



(Advertisement) 



106 



iS Reader Service — see page 195 



i 



A 



i 



i 



FAST SCAN ATV 



— ?ftmn>w. 



-#■ 



PRETLINED - COMPLETLY ASSEMBLED 
ONLY ONE NEAT SMALL ANTENNA FOR 

UP TO 6 BANDSl EXCELLENT FOR CON- 
GESTED HOUSING AREAS - APARTMENTS 
LIGHT - STRONG * ALMOST INVISIBLE I 



FOR ALL MAKES &> MODELS OF AMATEUR 
TRANSRECEIVERS - TRANSMITTERS - 
GUARANTEED FOR 2000 WATTS SSB 
lOOO WATTS CW. FOR NOVICE AND ALL 
CLASS AMATEURST 



COMPLETE AS SHOWN with 90 U, RG59U-52 ohm fetdlne, and PL259 tftflfittw, mtulatort, 30 ft 
300 fc ten dtcron end mpports. center connector with buHt In Ughnlng erre*ter end italic titatharge * 
melded, seated, weatherproof, reionent trap! 1"X6"'-you jutt switch to band desired for eicaMant worldwide 
operation ■» tmnimftUnQ end racLavtngrt WT. LESS THAN 5 LBS. 

1 6 0-6 0~4 0-2 CM 5-10 bandi 2 trap-- wfth, 90 ft, RG58U - connector - Modal TTTBU . , .$59-95 

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107 



Paul A, Hudson WA6AVJ 
4135 Jackson SL 
Riverside CA 92503 



An Improved Display 
for the TR-7400A 

— very sensible 



Simple, fast, effective! 



The Kenwood TR-7400A 
2 meter FM transceiver 
is a fine radio, but it can be 
improved, operationally 
speaking, by a simple mod- 
ification. 
This modification: 

1. Eliminates out-of-band 
operation forever; 

2. Provides instant mon- 
itoring of a repeater input 
frequency; 

3. Costs nothing, requires 
no parts, and is easily 
restored* 

To proceed, disconnect 
the power to the radio and 
remove the bottom cover. 
Looking at the large receiv- 
er board from the front, 
locate wire-wrap pin "TS" 



at the left front edge of the 
board near the relay. Re- 
move the wire end from the 
pin by unwrapping. Now 
locate wire-wrap pin "RS" 
located at the right front of 
the board somewhat in 
from the right edge. 
Remove the wire from the 
pin by unwrapping. Slip 
this wire back through the 
cabling until it will reach 
pin ''TS", Trim off excess 
bare wire and solder to pin 
"TS". Finally, splice about 
three inches of insulated 
wire to the remaining wire 
and solder to the "RS" pin. 
Voila! The "TX OFFSET" 
switch now becomes an 
"RX OFFSET' switch. The 



radio will now transmit on- 
ly the frequency displayed 
on the LED readout [and 
the selector switches). No 
more accidental out-of- 
band transmitting when 
operating above 147.400 
MHz! The "RX OFFSET" 
switch now affects only the 
receiver frequency and pro- 
vides the +600 and 
— 600 kilohertz offset func- 
tion as marked. When work- 
ing through a repeater, 
the operator may instantly 
check the input frequency 
by flipping the switch to 
"SIMPLEX" to see if the 
station being worked can 
be heard directly, in- 
dicating that a move to a 



simplex frequency would 
be in order. Simplex opera- 
tion is the same as before 

modification. 

As a final touch, a white 
decal letter "R" may be ap- 
plied in place over the "T" 
above the offset switch 
and the caption "TRANS- 
MITTER FREQUENCY" can 
be applied above the LED 
readout. Shouldn't all 
transceivers operate this 
way? 

Credits to the Anaheim 
(CA) Amateur Radio Club 
and WB6ZFU for providing 
the information on the "RS" 
and "TS" functions. 



Bird 



P*" "^ 



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109 



Gary Kriss VE7CGK 
20776— J 14 Avenue 
Maple Ridge BC 
Canada V2X 1KI 



Inexpensive Scope Tuner 

— "budget here is QRP, OM" 



Build your own* 



After I looked for a long 
time at the Heathkit 
SB-614 monitor scope and 
theYaesuYO-100, I realized 
that I had no choice except 
to build my own tuner for 



my 3" general-purpose os- 
cilloscope. Building the 
tuner according to the 
Handbook would cost too 
much here in Canada, and 
besides, it lacked the 



ji 

COAXIAL 
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CI 

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AMD STAND-OFF 



Fig. 1, Modification to a general-purpose oscilloscope to 
allow direct input to the vertical deflection plate. The 
capacitors are 1-kV discs. 



simplicity I wanted. 

I built the tuner with 
parts I had on hand, so I 
hesitate to place any dollar 
values on them. 

The balun was a kW 
50-75 Ohm one. R1 is used 
to broaden the frequency 
response of the balun. 

CI and C2 can be 
changed to suit the power 
output. 

The unit was tested with 
my Yaesu FT-101B on 10, 
15, 20, 40, and 80 meters. 
Minimum meshing of the 
tuning capacitor, C2, was 
required on all bands. 

Use RC-58/U or RC-59/U 
to connect the tuner to the 
scope. 

It is important that the 



box is rf-leakproof! The 
Radio Shack metal cabinet 
I used has vent slots, and 
when I keyed the rig, my 
digital clock went into or- 
bit! 

My next project will be 
to reduce the size of the 
tuner and combine it with 
an swr bridge in one cabi- 
net in order to eliminate 
the box and the coaxial 
jacks. ■ 



W^ 




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t^ 1 Aeatfe/ Serv/ce — $08 page 195 



111 



Alexander MacLean 
WA2SUT/NNN&ZVB 
18 Indian Spring Trail 
Denville NJ 07834 



The Resistance Substitution Box 

a ham's forgotten friend 



Does a lot for a little. 




. 



Here's what they pack into a 3"W X 2M "D X 6"H case. 

These are husky parts, too, not flimsy. 



In previous articles, I 
have been known to 
breezily advise readers to 
adjust a resistance value. If 
you are sitting there with a 
100k, 1 /4-Watt carbon film 
resistor trying to figure out 
how to adjust it, you are 
probably thinking about 
getting me alone in a room 
for five minutes and ad- 
justing me. That's not fair, 

In self-defense, and to 
help solve the problem, I 
will tell you about one of 
the most useful pieces of 
test equipment and tools 
available to the experi- 
menter or anyone who re- 
pairs equipment. 

I have wanted to write 
this article for a long time, 
but I kept putting it off, try- 
ing to see if it couldn't be 
presented as a nice easy 
construction project which 
would save all sorts of 
money. What it kept com- 
ing down to was that I 
could save a few dollars 



rolling my own, but a 
reader might not be able to 
duplicate it easily, and the 
few bucks wasn't worth the 
irritation. 

The tool is a resistance 
substitution box, A kit ver- 
sion represents one of the 
best dollar values around. 
The price for the whole kit 
is so close to what the parts 
would cost that it actually 
represents a greater value. 
Everything is done for you. 
You just have to put it 
together. That's getting 
most of the hand labor 
almost free, 

I bought the Heathkit 
model IN-3137 in kit form. 
The first thing you notice is 
that you get a husky hand- 
ful of parts. In spite of the 
relatively small price, this 
is a meaty kit. 

The Heath instructions 
are well known and there 
were only a few sticky 
places not really pointed 
out. They are in the area of 
general construction hints. 



112 




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§** Reader Setvtce— see page 195 



113 



When mounting the two 
binding posts, it helps to 
put a small nail or some- 
thing through the little 
hole so you have a handle 
to hold the hole in position 
when you tighten the 
mounting nut. This way the 
pieces will be lined up the 
way you want them rather 
than just randomly as they 
happen to hold. 

The only fussy job in the 
kit is soldering the mount- 
ing ring that holds the 
ground end of all the re- 
sistors. This shows in the 
photo. It just takes a little 
care and forethought You 
want to have the resistors 
mounted evenly and the 
ring at the correct height so 
that the finished assembly 
will fit in the case. 

Do the first resistor at 
the right height as per the 
instructions, and then 
choose a resistor at the 
other end of the ring and 
do it. If you space about 
four resistors around the 
ring, it will let you set the 
ring at the correct height 
easily and make a fairly 
rigid assembly to mount 
the other resistors to 
without worrying about the 
lead length. I did not think 
of this until after I did the 
soldering of each resistor 
in order, so mine looks a bit 
lopsided. 

There really were no 
problems putting the kit 
together, and I could only 
fault it slightly in a few 
areas. 

I would have liked to 
have color-coded binding 
posts — one red, one 
black — to tell which one 
went to the big lump of 
metal. It can be marked on 
the case. 

It would have been nice 
to have a couple of color- 
coded insulated clip leads 
supplied, With all the test 
gear hooked up for testing, 
that's one thing you may 
be shy of when you go to 
use the box. It doesn't cost 
much to make your own, 
but you won't think of it 
until you are working and 
need them NOW. 






: : : . * :■>:;:* 








The only sticky part is mounting this S-r'mg full of resistors. The text gives some bints. 



There are a few other 
construction hints to keep 
in mind. As you put it 
together, remember that 
you may have to take it 
apart. 

Unless you just plan to 
look at it on the bench, you 
will probably fry a few 
resistors along the way like 
the rest of us. They will 
have to be replaced. Don't 
wire them in for the ages. 

It may still seem a bit ex- 
orbitant to spend that 
much for a box of resistors 
and a few switches. 1 got 
along without one for a 
while, but r once I had one, 
I did not want to do with- 
out it. 

Years ago, I would use 
clip leads and wire in a 
resistor near what I wanted 
from the junk box. 1 had an 
assortment of values, none 
too complete, but it did 
work. The problem was 
that it was clumsy and it 
took far too much time. 
Also, the box is a lot more 
precise than you might 
think. 

In Fig. 1, the problem is 
to determine the resistance 
value to allow only so 
much current to the LED. 
From looking at circuits, 
you have some idea of the 



current range most LED cir- 
cuits take. 

Let's fill in some more. 
You don't know what the 
junk-box LED is rated at, so 
you want to go easy, You 
can tell a bit from the way 
it lights, assuming you 
don't blow it right off the 
bat. 

Hook up the VOM to 
read milliamperes (low 
range) and the box in place 
of R*L Start at a high value 
of resistance — in this case 
10k. You might as well get 
into the habit of starting at 
the very top, Slowly click 
your way down range, 
Watch the meter and the 
LED carefully. At some 
point, the LED will just 
start to light and the meter 
start to read. 

Most LEDs can handle 
about 10 mils or so. As you 
watch the LED, watch the 
meter. The LED will prob- 
ably light dimly at first and 
get brighter as you lower 
the resistance and increase 
the current. 

You may reach a point 
where an increase in cur- 
rent only makes a slight in- 
crease in actual brightness. 
This is about the maximum 
current point, For the best 
results, increase the resis- 



tance a notch or so until 
the LED starts to drop off 
the other way. Somewhere 
in that range is where you 
want to be, Not dim, but 
not the brightest it will go. 
That 1 0-mA figure is a good 
target for an unknown LED. 

This is the best working 
range for the LED. If you 
have to save current — 
perhaps you are running a 
lot of LEDs from a bat- 
tery—you might even want 
a dim light and a smaller 
current. Here, current 
would be the main factor, 

The point is that, using 
individual resistors and 
clip leads, you would have 
only had time to try one or 
two in the time it took to 
read this. Using the box, 
you would probably have 
completed the job in that 
much time and in a far 
more controlled and safe 
manner. 

Let's take another job. 
You are working in an 
audio section. You have a 






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114 







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115 



dead triode amplifier 
stage. You look in and find 
that the plate load resistor 
is fried to a crispy color. 
What was it? 

You can get a hint from 
similar circuits or maybe 
what else is in the set, but, 
if you want to get it going 
fast, it's easy. 

First check for other 
damage, like a shorted 
bypass capacitor that 
caused the resistor to draw 
too much current or any 
other trouble in the circuit 
which should be corrected 
before replacing parts (you 
don't want to burn up the 
replacement resistor, par- 
ticularly the one in your 
substitution box). 

Clip the box into the cir- 
cuit set at its highest value. 
Then click down as you 
monitor the stage. If 
nothing else is wrong with 
the stage, it should click in 
at some point. Play around 



and choose the best value 
for operation, then replace 
the box with the fixed 
value. 

Of course, you can see 
how handy the box would be 
for experimental purposes 
if you were designing a 
stage, it makes it a breeze 
to try values and evaluate 
performance quickly. The 
nice thing is, the box will 
work just as well with tube 
or transistor circuits. The 
one-Watt values are good 
for most tube circuits and a 
higher percentage of tran- 
sistor work. 

The one way you can im- 
mediately damage it is to 
send too much current 
through one of the resis- 
tors. The use of a milliam- 
meter is recommended. 
Also, the switch is rated at 
only 500 volts. 

A little common sense 
about what you hook it to 
can help, too. Before you 




The completed box has a nice husky feel to it and won't 
get lost on your bench. 



start clicking, use your 
pocket calculator to figure 
Ohm's Law for a few of the 
values and see what the 
current and power would 
be. 

Most of the time, a little 
thought will keep you on 
the safe side of the power 
ratings. Once in a while, 
you may hit the box too 
hard. Get out the iron and 
welcome to the club. 

There is one big thing to 
watch for. If the circuit 
calls for a power job, or 
you see one in there 
already, keep the box out 
of there. Even for a short 
test, it's risky. 

Sooner or later you will 
put too much current 
through one or more of the 
resistors. This happens to 
everybody. It is the fate of 
the experimenter. A little 
bit of preventive care and 
knowledge will go a long 
way toward helping you 
over this problem. Besides 
care in construction, you 
should have a bit more 
detailed knowledge of 
what's in there. 

When you build, or buy, 
your RC box, hook up your 
bestohmmetertoit. I hope 
that you have something 
that is fairly accurate. 

I keep a fewl % resistors 
handy to check mine with. 
It doesn't have to be a lab 
meter. Mine is rated a 
nominal 3%. The box 
resistors are within 10%. 

Go through the whole 
range of resistances and 
write down what they all 
measure when the box is 
new. File the information 
with the book that came 
with it Then it's easy to go 
back and check it every 
now and then or when you 
think you might have fried 
something. You will have a 
known set of standards to 
compare with. 

When you make the 
chart, do not fuss if they do 
not seem to be exactly 
right on the nose. They are 
only supposed to be within 
10%. At 100k, you could 
read 90k to 110k Ohms. 

If you have it wired cor- 



rectly, they should all be 
within tolerance. You 
might possibly have one or 
two out. It could be a faulty 
resistor, or maybe it got 
too much heat. If you have 
more than that r you had 
better check your meter 
out with a friend's before 
complaining. 

To repair the box, just 
measure the values and 
replace the ones that got 
out of tolerance. You can 
assume that they will age 
and they will get some cur- 
rent once in a while. 

While the values seem 
far apart when compared 
to the chart of available 
resistor values, they are ef- 
fectively within range of 
each other. The in-between 
values will make a dif- 
ference in actual circuit 
operation, but the box 
values will make what 
might be called a signifi- 
cant difference. It's big 
enough that the difference 
will be noticeable, but not 
so much that it doesn't 
have a safety margin. With 
care, you should have plen- 
ty of notice that you are 
getting near a danger point 
of operation. 

While it won't do your 
fine pruning, it will put you 
in the range you want to be 
and should give you an 
operative circuit value. 

One obvious question is, 
what about all those 1% 
transistor circuits you 
seem to have to work with? 
Well, they would be a 
problem no matter what 
you were using. The basic 
problem is that there really 
is no such thing as a 1 % cir- 
cuit in electronics. It may 
be that when it rolls off the 
assembly line (most aren't), 
but give it a while and it 
will be out of tolerance. 

For most uses, you have 
no business making a cir- 
cuit that is that critical. 
Most tube and transistor 
circuits are nominally 
within ten percent when 
new. 

After regular use, most 
circuits I've worked with 
were within 20%, Most 



116 



well-designed circuits will 
work with parts values 
±50%. 

Often an out-of- toler- 
ance circuit wiN work just 
fine and not be the trouble 
you are looking for. You 
may also have the problem 
that it would cost too 
much to go through the en- 
tire equipment and bring 
everything up to tolerance. 

With precision equip- 
ment this is not desirable, 
but there comes a point 



where it costs too much. In 
this case, you don't have to 
worry so much about toler- 
ance. Does one of the 
values work? Put in a preci- 
sion replacement. 

If you are designing your 
own equipment, aim for 
noncritical design and 
standard parts values. That 
little bit of theoretical ad- 
vantage in optimizing can 
be quickly offset by nor- 
mal aging and servicing 
problems. 



Another thing, ff you are 
trying a range of values 
and the circuit is critical as 
to value, it may be a strong 
indication that its design is 
wrong. 

Most functions can be 
performed by noncritical 
circuitry. The added stabil- 
ity to be gained thereby 
can be quite valuable. 

Save the critical circuits 
for where you need them. 
Even then, it pays to use 
common sense about val- 



ues. Is it something you are 
going to be able to get a 
replacement for in X 
amount of time? That's 
something to think about. 

If you repair your own 
equipment, or if you like to 
bench-design your own 
gear, the resistance substi- 
tution box is a hard piece 
of equipment to beat For 
the job, its speed, versatili- 
ty, and low cost make it a 
real test and toot bar- 
gain.! 



CUSHCRAFT ATB-34 4 ele. Tri- 
band Beam, 100 ft. RG8 Foam 
coax, 100 ft. 8 cond. rotor 
cable, Ham III rotor Regular 
$458.96, Special $389.95* 

SWAN TB4HA 4 ele. Triband 

Beam Regular $259 9^ Special 

$219.95, 

SWAN TB3HA 3 ele, Triband 

Beam Regular $199,95, Special 

$169 95 

MOSLEY CLASSIC 33 Triband 

Beam Regular $304.75, Special 

$199.95. 



ANTENNA SPECIALS 




amaTeur 
rawo inc 




laeDAiDAomvE 

COLUMBUS. OHIO 
( Rev^o id sburg } d 3068 



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WILSON GT-46 Telescoping 
Tower (Guyed) Regular $249.95, 
Special $179.95 
WILSON GT-46 Guy Kit for 
GT46 Tower Regular $94.95, 
Special $64.95 

NEWTRONICS G6144B 2 M 
Vertical Ant. Regular $79.00, 
Special $63.95 

CALL FOR QUOTES ON ALL 
YOUR AMATEUR AND SHORT- 
WAVE NEEDS. ALL ITEMS 
SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE. 



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OUR NEW BANDPASS- 
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Models available for all Ham 
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CALL OR WRITE FOR DETAILS: 



WACOM PRODUCTS, INC 

Box 7307 

Waco Texas 76710 

817/776^4444 



W\ 



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FT-101ZD 



in stock at 



TOWER ELECTRONICS 



24001 Alicia Pky. 

Mission Viejo, CA 92691 

(714) 768-8900 




REPEATER 
AUTO PATCH 

Otter your club COMPLETE 
emergency communications 
Commercial quality, gold plated contacts, plug 
in, epoxy glass PC boards. t2 volt DC or 115 volt 
AC operation - Power supply included. Four 
digit access - Single digit releases - field 
programmable. Hybrid network - No switching 
required. FCC certified telephone line coupler. 
Auxiliary "In Use" contacts supplied. Land line 
"call-Sn" 1 signalling control contacts provided. 
Price complete S498 * $3 shipping & handling. 
Master Charge, Bank monBy order, or certified 
check acceptable, 

Accessories: CES-300 powered tone 
pad - 1SQ BUS-C0M Soft-touch* telephone 
powered mike/pad efement-$34J5. »*me 




MONROE ELECTRONICS, INC 



412 House! Ave,, Lvndonvilte, N,Y + J4098 



118 



p" Reader Service— see page 195 



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615 868-4956 

for the Best DEALS 



Amateur Radio Supply of Nashville, live 



615 South Gallatin Rood, Madison, Tennessee 37115 ^A40 



best prices -best service -best trades 




YAESU FT 901 DM 

Call for yours today! 





DENTRON GLA 1000 

1 KW DC Input' • 1200 W PEPH 

DENTRON 

Cllpperlon L * WLA 2500 • DTR 2000L 

We have The New Denlrcm AM A Audio Processor 

Den It on Antenna Tuners Antennas and SWR M* Itrs 

CHECK OUR PRICES 




THE NEW FT101ZD 
I! IN STOCK !( 

Digital 160M-1DM * Deluxe Features 
Ch*ck m* Dlhrn . . , then ff*1 out pric«r 



Fast UPS delivery Place your order then 
al a nd bac k *' l W e sh i p your o rd e r t he same day 
we gel it Best prices and quick handling of 
your order. 

Used Equipment? Our stock lurrmfasl 
- wnie or call your specific need a, 

CLOSEOUT SPECIALS! 

Send S A S £ for our prnk sheet specials 



STORE HOURS 

Mon. - FrL 9 AM - 5 PM 
Sun, 1 PM - 6 PM 



TS-820S $ KENWOOD 

Deluxe 1 .8 - 30 MHZ Transceiver 
Call or write for special price!!! 




KENWOOD TR7600 
KENWOOD TR7625 

10 or 25 Watt FM 7 mater scevr synthesized 
with memory G*l our beet price! 

IN STOCKH Also ask about the RM 76 
MICRO processor tor the ?6O0/7625 



PUT VOUPSELF IN THE PICTURE!* 
Gel in on the latest m Ham Radio 

SSTV — ROBOT 




IN STOCK 

Call or wrn# for prices 



fCOM 701,211,215. 280, 30A - 
ALL IN STOCK!! 

Compare Our Prices 1 " 




CDE ROTOR SPECIALS 

The NEW HAM IV Rotor 

Stripping included 
HAM IV RoiOf S147" 
Ham IV Rotor with 100 ft rotor cable SI 62°° 
Ham IV Rotor plus 100 ft each - rotor cable 
and first grade RG 0U S1B5 1 " 
Send csthteri check Of MO 




KENWOOD'S NEW TS 120S 

ALL SOLtO STATE HF TRANSCEIVER 
PLUS A FULL LiNE OF ACCESSORIES 

Be tor* You Buy. Get Our Prices! 



We atock the FULL Kenwood and 
Yaeau line. CALL US!! 

MIRAGE 

BIOS 2M AMP • MP1 HF SWR MTfl 

MP2 VHF SWR MTR 

We've got 'em in stock' Call of write lor prices. 

2M HAND! TALKIES?? 
WILSON, YAESU, TEMPO 

DATONG 

We stock the amazing Da long Ft i agile 
active audio filter - absolutely a fantastic 
addition to your station 




TEN-TEC 
OMNI D & A 

UNBEATABLE PRICES!! 
Full TEN-TEC Line In Slock 

Get On Frequency! 

DSI Counter Semi-kit 



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Write or call for special price. 



sura, we take trades on new 
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Were Burning to make "Hot" 
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■: ■■ ■■ 



Imagine All The Places You Can TUck 
ICOM's Remotable IC-280* (Think smaii.) 



The IC-280 2 meter mobile comes as one radio 
to be mounted in the normal manner: but, as an 
option, the diminutive front one third of the radio 
detaches and mounts by its optional bracket, 
while the main body tucks neatly away out of 
sight Now you can mount your 2 meter radio in 
pint-sized places that seemed far too cramped 
before. 

Measuring only 2%"h x 7"w x 3%"d T the 
bantam -sized microprocessor control head fits 
easily into the dash, console or glove box of even 
the most compact vehicle. Or if those places are 
already taken by the rest of your "mobile shack, n 
the IC-280 head squeezes into leftover nitches 
under the dash, overhead^ under the seat or even 
on the steering column. 

But don't be misled by the petite size of this 
subdivided radio: the IC-280 is jam packed with 
the latest state of the art engineering and conveni- 
ence features. No scaled down technology here! 



With the microprocessor in the detachable control 
head, your IC-280 can store three frequencies of 
your choice plus the dial, which allows you to 
select from four frequencies with the front panel 
switch without taking your eyes off the road. 
These frequencies are retained in the IC-280's 
memory for as long as power is applied to the 
radio, even when power is turned off at the front 
panel switch. And if power is completely removed 
from the radio the ±600 KHz splits are still main- 
tained! 

The IC-280 works frequencies in excess of the 2 
meter band with ICOM's outstanding single-knob 
tuning, so you can listen around the entire band 
without fooling with three tuning knobs. With 
steps of 15 KC or 5 KC, the IC-280 puts rapid and 
easy frequency change at your single fingertip 
and instantly displays bright, easy to read LED's. 



^rrrmmrrmrm 



Available Options; 



Touch Tone pad/microphone combination, 
which fits the mlc plug on the radio face with 
absolutely no modification 

(Fits all ICOM 4-pin mic radios) 

15' unassembled cable kit for Jong distance 
remote mounting of the detachable 
control head 





K-280 

2 meter FM, 4+ MHz 
Mobile Transceiver 



[f you are a newly licensed novice, send for iCONTs catalog and discount purchase coupon. Mail your name, call sign and date of license to your ICOM 
distributor (see the bottom of this ad), 



AJ1 ICOM radios significantly 
exceed FCC regulations 
limiting spurious emissions. 

Specifications subject to 
change without notice. 



tC-280 Specification*: D Frequency Coverage 143.90—I4S.11 MHi n Operating Condition.*; Temperature: -1(1 *C to 60^ (14 *F to 140 *F1 

Duty Factor: continuous U frequency Stability.: £1.5 KH* D Modulation Type- FM {F3J G Antenna Impedance: 5ft ohms unbalanced □ Power 
Requirement; DC 13-SV ±15% (negative ground) D Cirrrerii Drain : Transmitting: 2.5A hti UOW), 1.2ALo.{JWJ, Receiving O.630A at maitaudjo 
output, 0.450 at SQ1- ON with no signal P Siw: S^mm^n} x 156mm M x22Smm{d) d Weight; approx. 2.2 Kg D Power Output: 10W Hi, 1W Lo 
□ Modulation System: Phase DMu. Frequency Deviation: ±5 KHi □ Spurious Output: more than 60 dB nefow cirrter D Microphone 
Impedance: 600 ohms dynamic or etectrei cflndenseif type, such as the SM2 D Receiving System: Drjy bk superheterdyne Q Intermediate 
frequency: 1st: 10.695 MHz. 2nd: 455 KHt nSenstthflty-. luv al S +N /N at 30 dB or better. Noise suppression sensilivity 20 dB, 0.6 uv of less 
D Seiettfulty: less than ±75 KHi at -6 dB, less than ±15 KHi al -60 dB O Audio Output; More than 1.5W □ Audio Output Impedance: 8 ohms 




ICOM 



ICOM WEST, INC. 
Suite 3 

13256 North r up Way 
Beilevue. Wash. 98005 
(206) 747 9020 



DISTRIBUTED BY: 



ICOM EAST, INC. 

Suite 307 

3331 Towerwood Drive 

OaHas, Texas 75234 

(214)620-2780 



ICOM CANADA 

7087 Victoria Drive 

Vancouver B.C V5P 3Y9 

Canada 

(604) 321-1833 




• 







LONG'S 
HAM 




Prices in this catalog subject to change 
without notice. Prices good only 
while supply lasts. 






200 

WATTS 

PEP 



KENWOOD TS-120S HF SSB transceiver 

An incredibly small, all sohd state transceiver with mtnia- 
turned circuits featuring; a new PLL circuit thai does not 
require a crystal element for each band, built-in digital 
display. IF shift system, built-in 3.5-29.7 MHz and WVW, 
built-in cooling fan. protection circuit for the final transis- 
tor, 4 fixed channels, available, noise blanker, built-in VOX, 
built-in 25 KHz marker, power requirements: R 0.7A 13,8 
VDC T 18A 13.8 VDC PS-30 power supply optional, regu- 
lated 13.8 VDC at 15A continuous, 20A intermittent. 139/00. 



699.95 



Call for quote. 



>rdd,.p«j<p a .. ,■!■.,,, hf ,,, m hH>ii<Hpi>1 iin' li ->'-i i, l 
r""**Pt4P4HI*llll4limriillMMirihllllhlMlHllhMHimLl 
tltt tlttrknn >.. ii,. .1.1. ...,,,, 1 1 II kid b L,, | m, i,.,.i, 1 1,^ 






GUIDE 



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NEW! 





YAESU FT-101ZD HF transceiver 

Full band coverage 160 to 10 meters and WWV. digital plus analog 
readout, noise blanker. RF speech processor, VOX. heater switch, 
modes SSB and CW, variable IF bandwidth, RF and AF gain 
controls, buiit-in power supply, 6146 final tubes, input power 1B0 
WDC 



TEN-TEC Omni D transceiver 

Totally solid state transceiver with a digital readout Covers 150-10 
meters, VOX and PTT. built-in squelch. builMn a pos. CW/SSB 
filter, 2 speed break-tn power input. 200 watts with a 50 ohm load, 
100% duty cycle, basic 12 VDC operation. AC power supply 
252M. O Optional List 126 00 



895.00 



Call for quote. 



1069.00 



Cam for quote 



VISA 



•HU 



mu I 



v 



f m 1 

1 L ^ y. 



MAIL OROERS PO BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM, A L 35202 * STREET ADDRESS 2808 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 352 



r A 







DENTRON GLA-1000 
linear amplifier 

Freq 80 to 15 meters, covers most 
MARS frequencies, RF drive max 
125, power consumption 117 VAC 
50/60 Hz 12 5 Amps, factory fused at 
1S Amps, 234 VAC 50/60 Hz 7 Amps. 
DC input l KW CW and 1000W PEP 
SSB, Final lubes 4 D-50A tubes 
(6LG6) 

379- 50 Calf for quote 




DENTRON METERS 

WP-1A wattmeter covers 160-6 
meters 20/20O/2OOOW. SWR bridge 

149,50 

WVP-1A wattmeter covers 50-160 
meters. 20/20QW SWR bridge 149.50 

WP-2A wattmeter covers 160-6 
meters, 200/2000W SWR bridge 99,50 




DENTRON MT-2000A 
antenna tuner 

Full power with continuous tuning 
1 .8 to 30 MHz, front panel grounding 
switch, handles 3KW PEP, inputs: 
unbalanced coax (SO-239 connec- 
tors), random wire, balanced line, 
built-in heavy duty balun (3 cores), 
capacitor spacing 6000V. transforms 
load impedance to 50-75 ohms 



199.50 



Call tor quote. 




DENTRON Clipperton L 
linear amplifier 

Hf/LO power switching, covers 160 
thru 15 meters. 2000W PEP SSS. 
1000W DC on CW. RTTY, SSTV. 
continuous duty power supply 2500V 
idieSSB. 1600V idle CW, covers most 
MARS freqs just outside ham bands, 
easily changed 117V or 234V AC 
50/60 Hz. Final Tubes 4-572B 



DENTRON HF-200A transceiver 

Cover 80-10 meters, completely solid state 
200W, 26.500 MHz-29000 MHz standard from 
factory {other crystals optional), modes USB 
LSB, CW, RTTY, CW, and SSTV. power supply 
requirements 13.6 VDC unregulated 20 A 
power input: SSB-200W PEP. CW-200W, load 
impedance; 50 ohms, tow dynamic mic input. 
RJT. VSWR: no internal shut down of power 
amplifier at any SWR ratio HF-ACS power 
supply available. 





699.50 



CalJ for quote 



WVP-2A wattmeter covers 50-160 
meters. 20/200W SWR bridge 99,50 

W-1 wattmeter covers 160-6 meters 
200/2000W. SWR bridge 69.50 

WV-1 wattmeter covers 50-160 
MHz. 20/200W. SWR bridge . . 69.50 

PS-20 VOM & wattmeter 20K per Volt 
VOM. 2O/2O0/2000W 69.50 

PS-10 VOM & wattmeter 10K per volt 
VOM. 20/200W 49.50 

S-2 power meter covers 160-2 
meters. Full range SWR bridge/rela- 
tive power meter 39,50 

Call for yours_ today. 




DENTRON MT-3000A 
antenna tuner 

Dentron's ultimate tuner! For coax, 
random wire, and balanced feed 
systems, built-in antenna selector 
switch for 5 different antennas, 
power handling 3 KW PEP, built-in 50 
ohm 250W dummy load, dual watt 
meters, 3 core heavy duty balun. 
continuous tuning 160 to 10 meters. 



349.50 



Call for quote 




DENTRON 

DTR-2000L 
2000W 
precision 
linear amplifier 

Features a Broadcast proven 8877 
tube, freq. coverage 160 thru 15 
meters, covers most MARS fre- 
quencies, modes: USB, LSB, CW. 
RTTY, SSTV. power requirements: 
234^117 VAC 50/60 Hz. RF drive 
power 125W max and 65W RMS min 
for 1 KW DC input. 1.8-21 MHz 
2000W PEP 




DENTRON 

Big Dummy Load 

Now you can tune-up off the air! A 
fuM power dummy load, it has a flat 
SWR, full freq. coverage from 1.6 to 
300 MHz and a high grade of rndus- 
trial cooling oil furnished with the 
umt. Fully assembled. Cut out the 
ORM factor now! 



29.50 



Can today 





DENTRON 
All band 
doublet 
antenna 

Covers 160 thru 10 meters and has a 
total length of 130' (14 ga. stranded 
copper) may be made shorter. 
Center fed through 100' of 470 ohm 
PVC covered, balanced transmission 
line. Assembly complete. Antenna 
tuner required. Tunes 160 thru 10 
with 1 antenna. 



24.50 



Call today. 




DENTRON Super 
Tuner Plus 
antenna tuner 

Matches any feedlme. built-in heavy 
duty 2 core balun, selectable antenna 
functions (4 antennas), alternate 
output, relative output meter. 10G0W 
CWand 1200W PEP SSB, continuous 
tuning 1.8-30 MHz. 



599.50 



Call for quote 



1199.50 



Call for quote. 



149.50 



Call for quote 



•TTH 




•LULM 



r - 1 

.,.*.., ,. II 



MAIL ORDERS PO BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM, AL 35202 * STREET ADDRESS 2808 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 35233 



t 



a 










. — ■ J«*< 



ARRL Publications 

ARRL Radio AmaSauf's Hendboo* Ne*ly revised 
A jarnpacked with everything from basics to 
latest dsvefopmenls I N 10001 9-7$ 

ARAL Redki AnvtniKl License Manual The 
moat up 10 0*1* compulation Of rules & 
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III 10012 *-» 




ARRL Antenna Handbook Complete instruc- 
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10026 5.00 

ARRL World Map IN 10099 3-50 

LCF C ■ k uli tor 3 1 i dfl r u le type ca it u i ator fa com- 
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Electronic Oat* Hook All you need to know aboui 
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Solid Slat* Dealgn tor the Radio Amateur 
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Solid Stale B amies Pure solid slate Information 
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ARRL Ham Radio Operating Guide Brush up on 
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Gelling lo Know Oscar Irom me Ground Up. 
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IN 10059 .. ... 3.00 



ARRL Radiogram Message Pads IN 



tO meter DXIng Handbook- Contains 4 sections 

on propagatfon, antennas, station equipment 
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The Amateur Radk> Vertical Anlenna Handbook 
The first boo* for amateurs solely about vertical 
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Radio Frequency Interference A now book 10 
help everyone understand fit- 1 it cavers all from 
good neighbor relations to simple lechmeai 
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1 n 100&3 3-oo 




ARRL Code Ml Upgrade your Novice or Teen 
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elementary principles of electronics A letis ho* 
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Ream Antennas Handbook by Wm Off W6SA1 
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The Truth About CB Anlennai t>* wm Orr 
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YAESU FT7B 
HF mobile 
transceiver 

Covers 10-80 meters, 26.5-29,0 crystals sup- 
plied, modes: LSB. USB. CW. and AM. input 
power 10GW SSB and CW DC, single knob tune 
up with variable control, 100 KHz calibrator, 
receiver offset tuning, RF attenuator, noise 
blanker, fixed audio peak filter for CW, 13 5. 



-*• iil 



VDC, semi-break-m with side tone, 
supply FP-12 optional List 132.00 



Power 



675.00 



Call for quote. 



YAESU FT-202R 

2m handheld 
FM transceiver 

1 watt output mini- 
mum, 6 channel capa- 
bility, flexible helical 
whip antenna, equip- 
ped with tonebursL 
compact size and 
light weight. S-meter 
and battery condition 
indicator, operates on 
6 A A NiGad or 7 AA 
dry cell batteries. 3 pr 
Xtals included 

199.00 

Call tor quote. 




ICOM IC-502 
6 meter SSB 
CW portable 

This unit has a telescoping antenna 
and hand mic. Frequency: 50 to 51 
MHz, modes: SSS, CW, RF out 
power: 3W SSB and 3W DC CW 
Operates with the IC-3PS power 
guppi //speaker, "C 1K batteries, or a 
NiCad battery pak* BC-20, Power 
supply: 13 8 V DC negative ground, 

238.00 Call for quote. 




^ 



... 



YAESU ACCESSORIES 

NC-1 NiCad charger for the FT-2Q2R 
110 VAC charging current 45 miili- 
amps mA, for 8-10 hrs ..,,39.00 

YM-24 speaker/mic, tor FT-202R. B 
ohms, impedance: 600 ohms, coifed 
cord & connector , 29,00 

YB-1 AA rechargeable NiCad bar 
tery. I 2V (FT-2Q2R requires 8 
batteries) » «.. .2.29 ea. 

VCC-202 vinyl case for the FT-202R 

9.85 ea. 

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TPL 702 2 2 meter 
RM amplifier 

Features: broad band frequency 
range, solid state, linear bias switch 
to operate on FM or SSB, input: 10W 
to 20W, output: 50W to 9QW, typical: 
10W in/70W out, frequency: 143 to 
149 MHz, 10OW PEP typical output 
with proper drive, 13.fi VDC ai 10A 

99*00 CaH for quote 



t H 2 f S 




YC-7B external 

digital display 

Remote display of operating fre- 
quency of the FT-7B. Complete with 
cable, innerconnections may be 
completed in seconds. Display 
resolution; to lGGHz{6digits). power 
connections for the FT-7B need no 
alignment, mounted with veicro 
pads 

I 0.00 Call today 




ICOM 
IC-215 

2m FM 
transceiver 

Features: 15 channel capacity. 
MOS FET RF amplifier and 5 tuned 
circuits in the front end for optimum 
sensitivity and selectivity. S-meter on 
from panel, dual power levet. 3W Hi 
for long distance, 05W Low for local, 
13.8 VDC. uses C batteries or re* 
chargeable battery pak. BC-20 



215.00 



Call for quote. 



• | £TTH 



■ ruiM.ma 



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ftft 



NPC 108RM 

regulated power supply 

Converts 115 VAC lo 13.6 VDC 200 
millivolts. 8 amps continuous, 12 
amps max. All solid state. Features 
dual current overload & overvoltage 
protection. Great for operating 
mobile Ham radio 2 meter AM-FM- 
SSB transceivers in your home Also 
can be used to trickle-charge 12V car 
batteries, 



109.95 



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KENWOOD TR-7625 
25 watt 2m transceiver 

Featuring memory channel, mode 
switch for simplex or switching 
transmit freq. up or down, full 4 MHz 
coverage. 800 channels. 5 kHz offset 
switch. MHz selector switch. LED. 
unlock indicator 



425.00 



HUSTLER RM resonators 

Precision wound with optimized 
design for each band. Assembly 
includes 17-7 stainless steel adjust- 
able tip rod for lowest SWR and band 
edge marker For medium or high 
power operation. Power rating: 400 
watts SSB. 




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RM-10 
RM 15 
RM-20 
RM-40 
RH-75 
RM-30 



meter 
meter 
meter 
meter 
meter 
meter 



resonator 
resonator 
/esonator 
resonator 
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16.95 
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antenna accessories 

AIO-1 mast for deck or fender mount 

22.95 
MO- 2 mast tor bumper mount 22*95 
RSS-2 resonator spring for either 

mount , « * , 5*65 

Blfl-1 bumper mount fits any shape 

bumper . . _ 15.95 

l-t 4- 144 feed line 144" long with PL- 
259 connector a spilt lead 4*95 



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MAIL ORDERS P O BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM. AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS 2806 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 3523 






r A 




B&W 5 50 A -2 2 positron coax switch] 

This unit features 2 
outputs, a power rat- 
ing of 2 KW PEP, 
VSWR less than 1.2:1 
up to 150 MHz 

14/95 

B&W 550 A 

5 position coax switch 

Featuring: power tat* 
tng of 1000W AM. 
2Q00W SSB, UHF type 
connectors, 5 outputs, 
VSWR is less than 
1.2:1 up to 150 MHz 
with very little inser- 
tion toss. 

16.50 





BENCHER BY-1 
iambic paddle 

The ultimate iambic paddle. Features 
solid silver contact points, full range 
adjustment, non-skid feet and heavy 
steel, black-textured base. Also 
available: BY-2 iambic paddle with a 
chrome base 49 95 

39.95 



£ 



NYE VIKING 114-310-003 key 

Constructed on heavy 
die-cast base with 
smooth adjustable 
bearings and heavy 
duty coin silver con- 
tacts 

9.65 



NYE VIKING 

"Master Key" 114-330-001 

Heavy die cast body, _^^ 

gold plated silver con- ^^* i^A 

tacts. Navy knob and 

2 conductor cords 

with V*" key plug 

19.50 





B&W 593 3 position coax switch 

This switch features: 3 
outputs, a power 
rating of 2 KW PEP, 
VSWR of Jess than 
1.2:1 up to 150 MHz.* 
grounds all unused 
antennas. 

17,50 

B&W 375 coax switch 

Power rating 1000W 
AM and 2000 W SSB. 
has 5 outputs. Grounds 
all unused antennas & 
has VSWR of less than 
1.2:1 up to 150 MHz, 

19.75 




QSL Card 
holders 

Hang your QSL cards 
in your ham shack. 
One package of card 
holders will display 40 
cards 2 plastic 
holders with 20 
spaces each. 

LOOea.pk 



KENWOOD MC-45 touch tone 

Dynamic mtc. PIT, 

Omnidirectional, 500 

ohm imp , adjustable 

tone output level. 

With coiled cord and 5 

pin conn. 

49.95 

DRAKE 1525EM auto-patch 

encoder and mic 
IC generator, no fre- 
quency adjustments. 
Digit ran keyboard 
Encoder audio level 
adjustable. Low 
output impedance 4- 
pm plug. 

49.95 



TG5- 

m 


^23 


MCUt 


IY4U 


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WW Oft 

£.1 -- 


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NCaCA 


1 Y¥11I 


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DYBRJ 


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mic 





B&W 595 coax switch 

Features: 6 outputs, a 
power rating of 2 KW 
PEP, VSWR of less 
than 1 2:1 up to 150 
MHz, grounds all un- 
used antennas. 

21.50 





^- *T . • ^' ^ - r « 



B&W 37$ 5 position coax switch 

Features: 5 outputs. f\ 

power rating of 2 KW **\.bsL 

PEP. VSWR less rhan 

1.2:1 up 10 150 MHz. 

grounds all unused 

antennas. 

19,75 




CUSHCRAFT AMS-147 
2m FM mobile antenna 

% wavelength, 3 dB gain 
antenna. Low SWR operation 
over entire 146-148 MHz FM 
band. Center freq. may be 
moved + 1.5 MHz with easy 
adjustment at the base. 50 
ohms, built-in connector 
takes PL -259- Magnetic 
mount 

34.95 




HY-GAIN 

HB-MAG 287 2m 
fold over mobile 
antenna 

% wave antenna, 3 dB 
gain, rachet foldover 
for mounting on 
hatchback or non- 
horizon l al surface, 
Power rated to 150W. 
less than 1.4:1 VSWR 
144-148 MHz. holds 
positron up to 150 
mph HB-TLM 286 
trunk lip mount 15.95. 




19.95 



Call today 






ffff 


• 




Mnaw^qf 





MFJ-720 deluxe 
super CW filter 

Gives you 80 HZ BW, no ringing, 2 
watts out. Selectable bandwidth 80 
HO, 180 Hz., center freq. 750 Hz, 
automatic noise hmiter. plugs into 
phone jack to drive speaker to 2 
watts r s 9-18 VDC, 300 ma. max. 2" x 
4" x 6". 



44.95 




^^ J+WT WR'l«irr 




MFJ-721 super selector 
CW/SSB filter 

Gives you 80 Hz BW, steep SSB 
sktrts, noise limiting, 2 watts for the 
speaker plus selectable bandwidth, 
simufated stereo reception, inputs 
for 2 rigs, speaker and phone jacks, 
plugs in to the phone jack, and has an 
B pole active IC filter 



Call today 



59.95 




MFJ-941B 
Versa tuner II 

Has SWR and dual range wattmeter, 
antenna switch, efficient airwound 
inductor, burlt-in balun, up to 300W 
RF output, Matches everything from 
1.8 thru 30 MHz. Operate all bands 
with just one antenna. $0-239 coax 
connectors provided. B" x T x 6". 



Call today. 



79.95 



Call today. 



•TTH 




MIU 




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MAIL ORDERS: RO BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM, AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS: 2808 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 35233 



C. Stewart Gtlimor WIFK 
Spencer Road 
Higganum CT0644I 



Vodka Amongst the Penguins 

— hamming with the Russians in Antarctica 



Mirnyy, 1961. 



i i ^ tew, how would you 
ij I ike to go to Antarc- 
tica for a year with the Rus- 
sians?" Professor Bob 
Heiiiwell asked me one 
morning at Stanford Uni- 
versity, California, in No- 
vember, 1960. 

''Sure/' I said, ''when do 
I go?" 

"Well," said Heiiiwell, 
"you'll leave right away. 
That is, if you get the job!" 



He explained that the 
National Bureau of Stan- 
dards at Boulder, Col- 
orado, under a National 
Science Foundation grant, 
was sponsoring a US ex- 
change scientist to go with 
the sixth Soviet Antarctic 
expedition to Mirnyy Base, 
Antarctica, They were in- 
terviewing several people 
at Boulder right then, 

"Something happened 



to the original candidate, 
and his replacement must 
be chosen and must leave 
for Antarctica immediate- 
ly," Heiiiwell said. "The can- 
didate will meet the Soviet 
expedition ship in Cape- 
town if he can get there in 
time, and the ship has 
already left Leningrad!" 

I was hoping to finish my 
E. E. degree in a couple of 
months. I had taken one 




Photo A The diesel ship OB is wedged in sea ice near Mirnyy, Antarctica, 



leave from school already, 
to work in the Azores 
Islands and also to study at 
Edinburgh, Scotland, but 
this chance was too good 
to miss. Bob Heiiiwell 
knew I was interested in 
Antarctica, since he was a 
Scoutmaster and remem- 
bered that I had narrowly 
missed being chosen as the 
Boy Scout to accompany 
the USIGY Antarctic Expe- 
dition. Also, I was familiar 
with the research work pro- 
posed by the National Bu- 
reau of Standards, since I 
had operated similar 
equipment during sum- 
mers when I had worked 
for the Stanford Research 
Institute. 

Well, I was lucky enough 
to get the job- I was briefed 
quickly at NBS and at the 
National Science Founda- 
tion in Washington. I then 
left New York City in a 
DC-7 bound for Capetown, 
accompanied by crates of 
gear weighing over 12,000 
lbs. In Capetown, [ met the 
Soviet ice cargo freighter 
OB (named for a large 
river in Siberia) and pro- 
ceeded to Antarctica, 
where I spent the next 13 
months at Mirnyy, the So- 
viet's largest base. (See 
Photo A.) 

Not only did I do radio- 



126 



physics research and meet 
and get to know many 
Soviet colleagues, but I 
also became one of the op- 
erators of UA1KAE, which 
was for some years Antarc- 
tica's only active Soviet 
ham radio station. During 
my interesting time with 
the Soviets, I traveled to 
numerous locations in the 
Antarctic, These included 
the Soviet Vostok station 
at the southern geomag- 
netic pole, where the world 
record for minimum tem- 
perature was set (—126,9° 
F., recorded in August, 
I960), and the US station at 
the geographic South Pole. 

I spent most of my time 
at Mirnyy station, located 

at about 93° E, 67° S, on the 
coast of eastern Antarc- 
tica. [See Photo BJ Mirnyy 
is situated on continental 
ice anchored by underlying 
rock formations near the 
sea. There is a dangerously 
steep 50-foot cliff over- 
looking the sea to the 
north; two hills protrude 
from the ice. UA1KAE, the 
ham station, and the rest of 
the radio transmitting 
equipmentfshown in Photo 
C) are located on one of 
these hills — "Sopka Radio/' 
which means Radio Hill. 
Mirnyy had a population of 
about TOO persons in the 
winter, including 20 as- 
sorted geophysicists and 
meteorologists, (See Photo 
D.) Most of us lived in 
separate buildings having 
from 3 to 12 occupants 
each, and, when weather 
permitted, we traveled 
along "Lenin Avenue" (see 
Photo E) to a central dining 
hall for meals, meetings 
and movies. 

My main purpose in go- 
ing to the Antarctic, be- 
sides serving as a guest and 
exchange scientist with the 
Russians, was to initiate a 
program of cosmic radio 
noise measurements in the 
Antarctic. To make these 
radio noise measurements, 
I brought along two Riome- 
ters. The Riometer was first 
designed to study auroral 



radio-wave absorption in 
Alaska, and the name was 
coined from Relative- 
/onospheric- Opacity 
meter. The instrument it- 
self was based on noise- 
measuring gear developed 
for radio astronomy. But 
whereas a radio astrono- 
mer would use such a 
receiver to measure galac- 
tic radio noise, I would use 
stellar radio noise as a 
signal source to measure 
the absorption of this noise 
at HF in the ionosphere. 
The absorption I measured 
is caused by, or associated 
with, solar storms, aurorae, 
and other geophysical 
events. 

Study of the upper ion- 
ized layers of the Earth's 
atmosphere, both from 
ground level and from 
rockets and satellites, is 
important not only for in- 
creased knowledge of plas- 
ma physics, wave propaga- 
tion, and geophysics, but 
also it contributes to our 
daily efficient use of the 
radio spectrum for tele- 
communications. Back in 
1925, Merle Tuve and Greg- 
ory Breit, at the Carnegie 
Institution's Department 
of Terrestrial Magnetism in 
Washington DC, first 
studied the ionosphere ver- 
tically using a pulsed, verti- 
cal-sounding transmitter 
and receiver — a crude 
radar. This technique was 
further developed during 
the 1930s and during 
World War II, and the stan- 
dard instrument which 
evolved came to be known 
as the lonosonde, 

This device, often using 
a delta or half-rhombic an- 
tenna aimed at the zenith, 
sends pulses skyward over 
a broad range of frequen- 
cies from 2 to about 25 
MHz. The reflected signals 
received at the ground 
allow one to measure the 
"height" of the ionospheric 
layers and the electron 
density at the peak of the 
reflecting layers. This type 
of approach has been used 
even in the polar areas for 
many years. 



90 *W 



ISO* 




KILOMETERS 



90'E 



Photo B. This is a picture of a map of Antarctica which was 
drafted by the author's wife, It shows the location of the 
four stations. 



Lt. Malcolm P< Hanson, 
of the US Naval Research 
Laboratory, constructed 
equipment and made the 
first such polar measure- 
ments while on Byrd's first 
Antarctic expedition, in 
1929-30. Edward V. Ap- 
pleton, who won the Nobel 
Prize in physics in 1947 for 
his ionosphere researches, 
utilized similar equipment 
in northern Norway during 
the 2nd International Polar 
Year in 1932-33. (The gener- 
al history of radio research 



in Antarctica is covered in 
my essay, "Early History of 
Upper Atmospheric Phys- 
ics Research in Antarc- 
tica," L J. Lanzerotti and C 
C, Park, editors, in Upper 
Atmosphere Research in 
Antarctica, American 
Geophysical Union, Wash- 
ington DC, 1978,) 

The lonosonde has def- 
inite limits to its use in 
polar regions: The man- 
made signals have to pass 
through the ionosphere 
twice, being absorbed on 





Photo C "Sopka Radio" (Radio Hill), where the Mirnyy 
transmitters and UA1KAE were located. 



127 



AM TEN* A 



R F DIODE 

SWtTCH UNIT 



i • 



HUU1ARLUWJ 



RECEIVER 



JUttO St*»WE5SiO*» 
CIRCUIT 



m DETECTOR 



I 



AuDJO 

f frequency 

AMPUFlEfl 



PHASE 

SENSITIVE 
DETECTOR 



HOiSf OIOOC 



HOiSE DIODE 
CONTROL CJflCUlT 



7 



D C 
AMPLIFIES 



PEH RECORDER 



REFERtNCE £*D 

S^LTCHING WAVEFORM 
GENERATOR 



J 



Fig. 1, Block diagram of Riometer. 



passing up from the ground 
and then absorbed again 
upon returning down 
towards the receiver. Dur- 
ing active auroral events or 
after solar storms, the ab- 
sorption of radio waves at 
MF and HF is frequently so 
high that no signal is re- 
ceived on the ground, and 
the ionosphere is said to be 
in "blackout" condition. It 
is so-called because the 
lonosonde record shows 
no evidence of returning 
pulses 

It is just during these 
events, however, that so 
much of importance hap- 
pens in radiophysics. C C. 
Little and H. Leinbach, the 
designers of the Riometer 
{Proceedings, i R. £., 47, p, 
31 5, 19591 realized that if a 
signal source could be 
placed outside the Earth's 
ionosphere, the signal 



would suffer much less ab- 
sorption. The device could 
then report continuously, 
even during total radio 
communications black- 
outs. In addition, the 
Riometer could measure 
absorption at frequencies 
as high as 50 r or even 150 
MHz, where no vertical 
pulses under normal condi- 
tions would be reflected 
from the ionosphere- 

Of the two Riometers I 
brought with me, one was 
for use at 30 MHz as the pri- 
mary unit and the other was 
a backup unit which could 
also be used at 50 MHz. 
(See Photo F.) Ionospheric 
absorption usually varies 
as the inverse square of the 
frequency; thus the 
50-MHz unit could be ex- 
pected to measure (30/50) 3 , 
or about 0.36 as much ab- 
sorption as the 30-MHz 




Photo D. A cold and windy "May Day/' 1961, at Mirnyy; 
the author is third from the left The power lines are from 
diesel-powered electric generators and run to the 
buildings where heat coiis feed hot water radiator systems. 



unit. The Riometer needed 
as its heart a good receiver. 
We chose the Hammarlund 
SP-600, since it was capa- 
ble of operating with a 
bandwidth of about 13 kHz 
and covered the HF bands 
up through 6 meters, thus 
allowing me to operate 
either unit on 30 or on 50 

MHz, 

Basically, the Riometer is 
a servo-controlled, self -bal- 
ancing receiving system 
designed to measure 
ionospheric absorption by 
monitoring "cosmic noise." 
The block diagram of an ear- 
ly version is shown in Fig. 1 , 
Reference to this diagram 
will facilitate interpretation 
of the following description. 
The diode switch unit 
switches between the an- 
tenna and the servo noise 
diode at an audio rate. The 
resulting signal is fed into a 
low-noise receiver (the 
SP-600) whose detected 
output consists of alter- 
nated noise from the an- 
tenna and from the servo 
noise diode. If the two in- 
puts are balanced, the 
detector output looks like 
an audio square wave. 

The receiver-detector 
output is fed through an 
audio suppression circuit 
and an audio amplifier in- 
to a phase-sensitive detec- 
tor, (The audio suppression 
circuit breaks the servo 
loop when a strong inter- 
fering signal is present ) 
The dc output of the phase- 
sensitive detector depends 
in amplitude and sign on 
the unbalance between the 
noise-diode signal and the 
antenna signal The output 
of the phase-sensitive 
detector is fed to a dc 
amplifier whose output 
constitutes the input signal 
to the noise-diode control 
circuit, which functions in 
such a manner as to bring 
the noise output of the ser- 
vo noise diode into equali- 
ty with the noise signal 
power from the antenna. 

The plate current of the 
servo noise diode is direct- 
ly proportional to the input 
power of the antenna sig- 



nal and is recorded on a 
pen recorder. Additional 
refinements, such as 
sweeping the local oscilla- 
tor of the receiver through 
100 kHz and using a mini- 
mum signal detector, serve 
to minimize the effects of 
interference on the Rio- 
meter Solid-state Rio- 
meters having digital out- 
put and automatic data 
processing are now in use, 
but my vacuum tube units 
at Mirnyy in 1961 were 
quite similar to the original 
design of Little and Lein- 
bach, They required daily 
calibration and adjust- 
ment. 

The Riometer was a big 
improvement over merely 
measuring receiver noise 
power, since the noise- 
diode current could be 
carefully measured each 
day and receiver-gain 
changes with tube aging 
had only a minor effect on 
the system. We wanted 
results accurate to one- or 
two-tenths of a dB over 
periods of a year. I had a 
very fancy ac-powered pen 
recorder, but I found the 
50-Hz power at Mirnyy 
varied by several Hz 
throughout the day, so I 
went back to using two old 
standard spring- wound 
Esterline Angus pen re- 
corders which I could ad- 
just to record with an ac- 
curacy of about plus or 
minus a couple of minutes 

a day. 

In addition to the Rio- 
meters, I had assorted test 
gear; two Hewlett-Packard 
'scopes, an rf bridge and 
signal generator, an H-P 
VTVM, and a Hickok tube- 
tester. I also had the loan 
of a fine Collins 51 J4 
receiver, courtesy of Mike 
Villard W6QYT of Stan- 
ford University. With this, I 
hoped to monitor short- 
wave-broadcast-station 
signal strengths after solar 
storm events and also try 
to listen for around-the- 
world echoes (and maybe 
long-delay echoes) from 
Villard's experimental 
transmissions on 21 MHz I 



128 



never heard any long- 
delay echoes, but in free 
hours I did get quite a bit of 
pleasure from monitoring 
baseball and football 
games broadcast over 
Armed Forces Radio, and I 
often caught Willis Con- 
over's Voice of America 
Jazz Show, 

For a student research 
project at Stanford, I had 
constructed a large, 84-ele- 
ment 4-boom log periodic 
antenna array on a rotating 
60-foot tower, combined 
with a 25-to-35-MHz 
sweep-frequency receiving 
system for solar and plan- 
etary radio astronomy in- 
vestigations (see Electrical 
Engineering, 81, p. 22, 
1962). Of course, I couldn't 
bring the LPA array with 
me, but I did bring the re- 
ceiving system. I hoped to 
erect a rhombic antenna 
and continue my measure- 
ments at Mirnyy. Although 
I made a few measure- 
ments, my first priority was 
to the Riometer work, and I 
didn't do much with the 
sweep-frequency radio 
astronomy gear. 

In addition to the above, 
I also brought with me an 
Ampex tape recorder and a 
small solid-state (remem- 
ber, we called them "tran- 
sistorized" in those days) 
Develco audio amplifier 
and loop antenna to record 
geophysical noises in the 
VLF range from about 100 
Hz to 10 kHz. Bob 
Helliwell had loaned this 
equipment to me. VLF re- 
cording was becoming of 
great importance to upper 
atmospheric and space 
physics research. Today, 
VLF research has assumed 
even greater importance 
for plasma geophysics and 
telecommunications re- 
search. Lightning strokes 
and other natural phenom- 
ena sometimes propagate 
as radio frequency energy 
along magnetic field lines 
from one end of the Earth 
out thousands of miles 
and then re-enter the at- 
mosphere at the other end 
of the field line. 



Each different frequen- 
cy—say, of the lightning 
stroke — propagates with a 
different velocity, so that a 
pulse which sounds initial- 
ly like a "click" near the 
source may sound like a 
long whistle, decreasing in 
pitch, at the other end of 
the Earth, As it turned out, 
a Czech visiting scientist 
had recorded "whistler" 
and VLF activity at Mirnyy 
station for some months 
before my arrival. Thus I 
sent the whistler gear on to 
Vostok station, a unique 
location with geomagnetic 
coordinates near 90° 
S — something like Thule, 
Greenland, in the north. No 
one then knew what sort of 
whistler activity would be 
heard at Vostok, since it 
was at such a high geomag- 
netic latitude. 

Although modern VLF 
work in the Antarctic dates 
from the late 1950s, VLF 
work in the polar regions 
was initiated on Byrd's 2nd 
Antarctic expedition in 
1933-34 by John Dyer (now 
W1 BjD). In those days, there 
were hopes of connecting 
"whistlers" with meteor 
sightings. Dyer never 
published his fasci- 
nating VLF observations, but 
correctly he noted no cor- 
relation between whistlers 
and meteors, My VLF mea- 
surements had only limited 
success, but my Riometer 
results were first in what 
has been a continuous and 
growing use of this radio 
wave-absorption measur- 
ing technique in Antarc- 
tica. 

When I first arrived at 
Mirnyy, I wished I had 
brought an HF transmitter 
with me for ham radio pur- 
poses. I had been licensed 
first in 1953 as WN0ODE, 
as a high-school freshman 
in Grandview, Missouri, 
and I had kept somewhat 
active as W0ODE and at 
the Stanford student sta- 
tion, W6YX. Looking 
through my stock of 
vacuum tubes, I figured 
that I could build a CW 




Photo E. This is 'Lenin Avenue/' the main drag at Mirnyy. 
The picture is taken from Radio Hill looking north to the 
other rocky hill which is at the edge of the sea ice. 



transmitter using a 12AU7 
or 6AH6 as a vfo, a 6AG7 
driver, and push-pull 6L6s 
running 75 Watts on 40, 20, 
and 15 meters. I knew I 
wouldn't have time to do 
any rig-building for several 



months, since we all had so 
much work to do to get the 
general aspects of the ex- 
pedition in order and to get 
the various scientific ex- 
periments working. 

For example, the anten- 




Photo F. The author is standing beside the 30-MHz and 

50-MHz Riometers. Also shown are the power supplies, 
Esterline-Angus chart recorders, test gear, and Ham- 
marl and SP6QQ receivers. 



129 



nas for my Riometers — see 
Photo C — were broad- 
band, 4-element yagis — 
that is, two driven ele- 
ments, each over a reflec- 
tor, phased so that the 
beamwidth would be ap- 
proximately circular. 
These elements were of 
aluminum pipe approx- 
imately 3 inches in diame- 
ter, placed around very 
heavy fiberglass poles. 
Erecting this array took 
quite a bit of time. Because 
of local conditions, 1 even 
tually replaced this rather 
elegant design with a sim- 
ple wire dipole placed 
over a metal roof as the 
reflector. 

Well, I mused over my 
proposed 6L6 rig and 
wrote a letter to the FCC to 
be mailed to them when 
the Soviet ship OB left the 
Antarctic to return to 
Leningrad, I wondered 
whether or not I should 
operate as W0ODE/KC4. I 
was on a continent not 
claimed by the US (or by 
the USSR, for that matter), 
and I was not on a US ex- 
pedition. 

In the meantime, I got a 
chance to visit the radio 
communications center at 
the base. This building had 
a small studio room for 
broadcasting to Moscow, a 
room for TeletypeTM 

equipment, and a general 
operating room containing 
tape recorders and several 
MF, HF, and VHF receivers. 
I learned that the military 
HF receivers used at Mir* 
nyy covered 1.5 to 25.5 
MHz. The transmitters, 
however, were not in the 
communications center 
but were located on Radio 
Hill, about a half mile 
away. This was done in an 
attempt to lessen local 
QRM when the station was 
operating simultaneously 

on several frequencies. 

Quite soon thereafter, I 
wandered up to the trans- 
mitter building and spent 
about an hour listening on 
20 meters. I heard good 
signals from South Amer- 
ica and also from several 



strong ham stations in the 
US. I also heard KC4USV at 
McMurdo Sound, Antarc- 
tica, 

I was told that the trans- 
mitter building was, in fact, 
the location of ham sta- 
tion UA1KAE. (See Photo 
H.) KAE signified Antarctic 
Continental Expedition; 
the UA1 indicated that the 
expedition's home base 
was Leningrad. I was told 
also that I could be one of 
the operators of UA1KAE. 
The station didn't operate 
during the austral summer 
since everyone was too 
busy, but as soon as An- 
tarctic autumn came 
around in March, I began 
to go up to the ham station 
once or twice a week, when 
weather conditions permit- 
ted. We had several trans- 
mitters at Mirnyy, some of 
5 kW and one or two of 
1-to-2k-W input. It was one 
of these latter transmitters, 
usually with dipole anten- 
nas, that was used for ham- 
ming. 

UA1KAE had averaged 
about 1500 QSOs per year 
since it had been set up in 
1957, The transmitter was 
not capable of SSB opera- 
tion. I attempted to 
operate AM, but the rig 
didn't seem capable of 
much modulation, so my 
contacts were nearly all 
CW, at least one-way I 
usually worked 20 meters, 
although I did get on 15 
and 40 meters. I didn't 
operate UA1KAE as often 
as I might have wished due 
to my own work schedule 
and also due to our 
weather. It doesn't get very 
cold at Mirnyy. Unlike 
Vostok, which regularly 
runs at about -100° F. in 
winter, Mirnyy rarely gets 
below -40° F. On the 
other hand, Mirnyy has a 
heck of a wind-chill factor! 

Mirnyy is located on the 
east coast of Antarctica, 
where the world's worst 
storms occur. The cold in- 
land bases have no wind to 
speak of during realty cold 
periods, but winds come 
down off the 10,000- to 




Photo G The author is erecting an antenna element 



13,000-foot plateaus of 
east Antarctica, meet 

much warmer winds off the 
Indian Ocean, and all hell 
breaks loose, One time, 
winds broke two Vi -inch 
steel cables holding down 
one of our IL-2 aircraft (a 
Russian version of the 
DC-3). The plane took off 
by itself under wind power 
and flew about 3 miles out 
over the sea ice before 
crashing into an iceberg! 
Many, many days the 
weather was such that we 
could not venture outside 
and go the 1 50 yards to the 
dining hall, or p if we coutd, 
we had to go in teams 
along rope-guided paths. 
Thus, the VS-mile trip to 
Radio Hill through drifts, in 
blizzard conditions, forced 
me to cancel a number of 
my hamming sessions at 
UA1KAE, 

One amusing thing often 
happened when I operated 
CW. UA1KAE was cele- 
brated throughout the 
USSR, and there often 



would be Soviet ham sta- 
tions piling up to work 
UA1KAE. In those days I 
did not know the Cyrillic 
alphabet in code (there are 
several extra letters such 

as: ya = ; ch = 

; sh ; 

etc.). The Soviet sta- 
tions, naturally, would 
swing into Cyrillic, I would 
then come back in badly 
transliterated Russian say- 
ing, "I do not write Cyrillic; 
I am an American operator 
of UA1KAE." Invariably, 
the Soviet operator then 
cut off his transmissions. I 
suppose at the least he 
thought I was a pirate sta- 
tion. 

I did haveafewCW-SSB 
QSOs with American hams. 
These were in attempts to 
talk with my parents in 
Kansas City, Missouri, and 
with some of my university 
friends in Palo Alto, 
California. Other hams 
passed traffic for me 
through the ham stations at 
McMurdo and other US 



130 





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131 




Photo H* This is the UA1KAE QSL card. The star marks Mimyy's location. 



stations; these hamgrams 
were then sent to me via 
Navy circuits from McMur- 
do to Mirnyy. Hams (some, 
regretfully, now silent 
keys), or calls I remember 
with gratitude, include 
Mike W0MAF, Fred W6QS, 
Jules K2KCJ, W0RDR, 
W0MM, and Lee Bergren. 

I had also another quite 
different but amusing inci- 
dent involving CW. I was 
asked to help get a RTTY 
link going between Mirnyy 
and McMurdo stations. We 
had tried for some days 
without success and also 
had had difficulty raising 
McMurdo on CW. I sug- 
gested that I could try 
McMurdo on the ham 
bands, and the chief radio 
engineer at Mirnyy agreed 
that it was worth the effort, 
so I went up to the trans- 
mitter building and listened 
on 20 meters sideband 
Sure enough, there was 
KC4U5V, big as life. 

Now, it happened in 
those days (just as it does 
today) that ham tickets 
were issued at Antarctic 
stations to men who sup- 
posedly had qualified in 
the Antarctic and were 
given Conditional class 
licenses. I am pretty sure 



that some of those license 
exams were a sham. I tried 
to break KC4USV's state- 
side SSB QSO via my own 
CW. I tried several times, 
slowing my CW to well 
under 1 3 wpm. The US ham 
called the KC4USV op's at- 
tention to my break call, 
but the KC4USV op mum- 
bled something about not 
being able to copy it and 
refused to let me break in. 

A couple of days later, 
when communications 
were re-established, I sent 
a short comment to one of 
the regular Navy CW ops to 
the effect that at least one 
of the KC4USV ops 
had better take some of the 
grease out of his jaw and 
begin applying it to his 
elbow. The Navy CW op 
agreed with me. Little did I 
know that the McMurdo 
communications officer in 
charge (a J knew virtually 
nothing about radio, (b) 
was one of those individ- 
uals who had been "given" 
Conditional tickets, (c) was 
the guy at the microphone 
at KC4USV the day I had 
tried repeatedly to break in 
on CW, and (d) read my 
brief radiogram describing 
his performance! 

That incident was al- 



most as funny as the time a 
US biologist at McMurdo 
had a fit when I told him 
over the radio that the 
"rare" white-blooded 
fishes we had caught in a 
Mirnyy fishing contest had 
been eaten by us right after 
the event. Boy, he howled 
about the principles of the 
scientific life, the duties of 
the scientist and so forth, 
when all he really wanted 
was for me to haul back 
some fish in formaldehyde 
so that he could publish a 
paper. I told him, truthful- 
ly, that we had no for- 
maldehyde at Mirnyy and 
that we had already drunk 
all the vodka and grain 
alcohol! Actually, the fish 
were fried up and were 
pretty good, tasting like 
perch. Penguin eggs, on the 
other hand, were terrible, 
tasting and smelling like 
rotten fish, (See Photo I of 
my friend "Little Vasily" 
and I trying to consume a 
penguin egg omelet) 

By the way, we didn't kill 
any birds or eat living 
penguin eggs at Mirnyy; 
the eggs we ate had been 
blown away from the Em- 
peror penguin rookery in a 
storm and had frozen. 

My Soviet friends made 



up in ingenuity for what 
they lacked in parts and 
supplies. While we did 
some rather hazardous 
things on aircraft flights 
(such as cooking lunch in 
flight on an open-flame 
burner, quite near barrels 
of aviation gasoline), they 
had a good air-safety rec- 
ord. Unfortunately, their 
fire-safety record at Mirnyy 
wasn't so good. Fire is a 
deadly enemy in the Ant- 
arctic since there is vir- 
tually no water available 
to fight it. Eight meteorolo- 
gists were lost at Mirnyy in 
a fire just 4 months before I 
arrived. 

Similarly, the Soviet 
communications equip- 
ment was boat anchor stuff 
which seemed to work 
pretty well. Even so, two 
old 1940s-vtntage RCA re- 
ceivers were incorporated 
into gear in use at Mirnyy, I 
assume that these were old 
lend-lease receivers from 
World War II. I had a 1960 
RCA Semiconductor Hand- 
book with me, and the elec- 
tronics people were 
amazed and almost in- 
credulous at the relatively 
large number of transistors 
which were then available 
to industry and to hams. To 
prove my point, I had at 
least the Develco VLF 
receiver to show for solid- 
state gear. NSB had al- 
ready constructed solid- 
state Riometers, but I 
could not take them to Ant- 
arctica because they had 
not yet been through the 
required six months of 
laboratory shakedown. 

Other items of great in- 
terest were my stereo 
music tapes, lightweight 
nylon clothing, Missouri 
corncob pipes, my Pol- 
aroid camera, and, of 
course, various men's pic- 
ture magazines 

On my part, I found 
quite fascinating the 
Soviet's leather and fur 
clothing, their language, 
the great similarities I 
found between American 
and Soviet humor, and the 
way Americans and Soviets 



132 




Photo /, The author and his friend, "Little Vastly" Nikonov, 
a meteorologist technician, attempting to eat the terrible- 
tasting omelet made from Emperor penguin eggs, 



view the world and react to 
numerous situations. {See 
Photo J.) Most of all, I 
found the Antarctic itself 
intriguing, subtle, and for- 
bidding. 

Lots of things have 
changed since I spent 13 
months as a guest with the 
Soviets 18 years ago. It's 
much more common now 



to see flights in and out of 
Antarctica, As everywhere 
else, computers, micro- 
electronics, and satellites 
have altered equipment, 
methods used, and re- 
search questions asked in 
the Antarctic, Mirnyy is no 
longer the main Soviet 
base, and even the Soviet 
ham calls have changed — 




Photo f. Mirnyy staff members celebrate the author's birth- 
day, Novembers, 7967, 



being things like 4K1A in- 
stead of the old UA1KAE. 
But all in all, it was a great 
experience for me, and I 
recall many events fondly. 
Finally, I must confess I 
have probably set a record 
or near-record for poor 
QSLing. In going through 
some old boxes last year, I 
found some 17-year-old 
QSL cards from UA1KAE 
for contacts I made. These 



had gotten mislaid in ship- 
ping my baggage out of the 
Antarctic in 1962. To those 
of you who have recently 
received 1961 QSO confir- 
mation from UA1KAE post- 
marked 1978 — sorry, fel- 
lows!! 

Note: My thanks to my wife, 
R, G. Gillmor, for drawing the 
map of Antarctica, and to A. 
Bothelt for help with photo 
reproduction. 



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Gel a "GREAT REBATE" Coupon at your nearest Authorized K /ood Dealer. 



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NWOOD 

fMirtsttter in amateur radio 

TRIO KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS INC. 
1111 WEST WALNUT COM PTON CA 90220 



KENWOOD 



Tech 
ialk j 

6A79 





{DIGITAL FREQUENCY CONTROL) 

in the TS-180S HF Transceiver 

features four memories with digital 

up/down paddle-switch tuning. 



Huw will four memories improve operating efficiency on the BFhaw bands? 

The TS-1BQS with DFC features four memories, each one digitally tunable 
up and down in minute 20-Hz steps by means of dual-speed paddle switches. 
It's like having four remote VFO's in addition to the built-in VFO. 

The serious DX chaser, for example, can program various OX pileups in- 
to the four memories, and periodically check those frequencies to determine 
if the DX statmn is listening for calls from his call area. The memories are 
usable for transmit, receive, or transceive operation. Therefore, a memory 
can be used on transmit and the VFO on receive, or vice versa, either of which 
can be tuned up or down in frequency, for working DX stations who are listen- 
ing for calls several ktlohertz away from their transmitting frequency With 
the push of a button, the operator can listen on his transmit frequency, which 
he can tune, and be ready for a perfectly timed call to the OX station, imme- 
diately after another station finishes working the OX station. 

The memories are also extremely convenient for contest operating. Pile- 
ups can be stored and periodically checked for improved propagation or other 
conditions for "getting through". A "CO CONTEST 1 frequency could also 
be stored. 

The memories are also very useful for stonng net and schedule frequencies 

What frequencies are displayed on the digital readout during memory operation? 

The digital display shows the memory frequency being used, whether in 
receive or transmit mode. It also shows the actual VFO frequency when the 
VFO is activated, or the fixed-channel frequency, orthe remote VFO frequency 
(if the optional VFO-1B0 is used), Separate RIT (receiver incremental tuning) 
controls are provided for VFO and memory/fixed-channel operation, and the 
RIT frequencies, when RIT is utilized, are displayed. 

When a frequency is stored in the "Ml" memory, the digital display can 
be switched to indicate the stored frequency and the difference between the 
stored and VFO frequencies (with signs to show VFO above or below the 
stored frequency). This function is handy for temporarily moving off of a net 
frequency with another station by a specified number of kilohertz. and, after 
completing the conversation, moving back immediately to the net frequency 
stored in the "M!" memory. 

What are the differences between the four memories in the TS-180S with EJFG? 

The Ml memory is intended for fast or temporary memory operation such 
as moving off of a net frequency. TheS M'. and Jvf" memories are used for 
relatively longer storage applications, such as for net frequencies, sched- 
ules, etc Any of the memones can be used for storing OX or contest pileup' 
frequencies or transmit or receive frequencies when working "split fre- 
quency" operation with a OX station 

How are frequencies stared in memory, and how ire they recalled? 

The OFC memones can store frequencies from the TS-180S internal VFO, 
the fixed channel, and the optional remote VFO. The RIT frequency can also 
be stored, and frequencies can be shifted from one memory to another. To 
store an operating frequency in Ml. simply set the main tuning to the desired 
frequency and push the DSP/MI switch; a "beep" will be heard. 




DSP/M1 



M.IN 

M 

i 


~~ i 



To recall the frequency stored in M1, set the M RECALL switch to M1, 

To receive on the memory frequency, the RCV switch should be in. To 

transmit on the memory frequency, the XMIT switch should be in. To trans- 

ceive on the memory frequency, both the RCV and the XMIT switches shoutd 

be in, 




TS-ieos 

To store frequencies in the other three memories, the main tuning is set 
to the desired frequency (which we will call frequency A for this explanation) 
and thelMswitch is pushed in (a "beep JI will be heard). To store frequency 
B, push the® switch to release it, and then push again ("beep"). Now fre- 
quency B will he stored in the EH! memory and frequency A will shift to the 
M r memory To store frequency C, push the El switch to release it, and then 
push again ("beep"). Frequency C is now stored mM frequency B in M\ 
and frequency A in M". 



C 



VFO — 

urcvX 




9 
XMIT 



FIX/M RECALL 

Ml 

FIX 






Storing another frequency in (M) will shift the memories again, and fre- 
quency A will be lost unless it is recalled and stored injwj again before an- 
other frequency is stored Therefore, as stations in memory are worked or. 
for some other reason, a memory frequency is no longer needed, it can he 
erased automatically ^ it shifts out of M'" where another frequency is stored 
inSO This method of moving memory frequencies "up the stack 1 ' retains thy 
chronological order of entry for easy operation, which is particularly impor- 
tant in a contest. The operator, then, does not need to remember which 
memory in which he stored a particular frequency. To recall any of the stored 
frequencies, simply set the M RECALL switch to the appropriate position. 

How can the memories be tuned up or down in frequency? 

On the front panel of the TS-180S are a pair of paddle switches for digitally 
tuning any of the memories up or down in frequency 



r 



M. SHIFT 



DOWN 




A memory frequency can be stepped up or down 20 Hz at a time If the 
UP or OOWN switch is kept depressed, the frequency changes continuously 
m 20-Hz steps The rate of change can be increased by depressing the op* 
posite switch while the appropriate switch remains depressed 

The original frequency can be recalted after it has been digitally tuned 
by the UP or DOWN switch, by moving the M RECALL switch to any position 
other than the one on which if is memorized, and then resetting it to the 
original memory position 

The memory frequency, after it is digitally tuned, can be stored by pushing 
the DSP/MI or thelM] switch. 

Will ntf mory frequencies be retained after power is shut off? 

All memorized frequencies will be retained for approximately 30 seconds 
after power is shut off. Memory backup batteries (Panasonic WL-14 or G-13, 
Eveready 357, Duracell 10L14. or RAY-0-VAC RW-22 or RW-42) may be in- 
stalled to retain memory frequencies tor an indefinite period after power is 
shut off. These batteries will function for about one year of normal operation, 
The batteries provide backup voltage for the[M], fVT. and M" memories. 

The M1/DSP memory is intended for temporary applications, but can be 
modified for backup battery operation The batteries are silver-oxide type 
and are not supplied by Trio-Kenwood. They are commonly available at 
local stores. 



FOR BEST PRICE AND 
FAST DELIVERY 

CALL 




TOLL FREE 



& v>HA/VLRADIQjCO« 



BlvtJ 



MO 



^■H2 



GOOD THINGS COME IN 
SMALL PACKAGES 




KLM's PA 2-25B 2 meter 
Power Amplifier proves it! 

2 watts IN -25 watts OUT 

4 watts IN-35 watts OUT (typ.) 

Scarcely larger than a pack of 
cigarettes 

Tucked away out-of-sight in your car (or motorcycle!), 
the PA 2-25B gets you mobile with a big boost in power 
— A perfect companion to the new hand-held rigs, too. 
Plus: 

• Full Band Coverage, 144-148 MHz, FM and CW 

• Efficiency, draws only 3 to 4 amps @ 13-5 VDC 

• Rugged heatsink case 

• Easy installation, RF in/out and fused DC line 

TREAT YOURSELF TO ONE OF KLM's "SMALL 
PACKAGES" -THEY'RE AT YOUR LOCAL KLM 
DEALER, NOW. 

KLM 17025 LAUREL ROAD. MORGAN HILL. CALIFORNIA 95037 (408) 779-7363 



/^SECOND ANNUAL LITTLE ROCkT\ 
i HAM-A-RAMA ■ 

Aug. 4 &5 f 1979 

9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday 

9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Sunday 

{Dealers may set up 

Friday evening) 

ARKANSAS STATE FAIRGROUNDS 
LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 

+ Dealer displays in air-conditioned building 

* A RR Lap proved hamfest with ARAL booth In 
display building 

* ARRL forum and MARS meeting 

* Giant flea market, $2 per parking space 

* Parly Saturday night 

* Covered flea market area in case of rain 

* No commercial dealers in flea market area 

* RV hookups on fairgrounds and two KOA 
campgrounds within 20 miles 

* Ha m test I ocaied 2 mi I e s west of '1-30 on Roose- 
velt Road 

* Talk-In on 146.34J.94 

* Hourly door prizes plus 2 major prizes 
+ For f u rt her I nf o rm at ion contact: 

Morris Mlddleton AD5M 

19 Elmherst Drive Dept B 

Little Rock, Ark. 72209 

Phone (501 >-568-0938 



v. 



j 



NOW from BETTS 



Hypersil power transformer 
Pri has 4 115 for 230 or 440; 
Sec 803 @ 735 ma.— Use 2 
xfmrs bridged for 1500 VDC 
Price pre-paid USA $39,95 

Jennings vacuum variables 
UCS-500 @ 7.5KV $165. 

UCSXF-1000 m 10KV $255, 
UCSXF-1200@10KV $275. 

Filter choke, swinging 
3-15 hy © .6- .06 amp res 112 
1KV ins. 5x6x7 29 lbs. 
Ship pre paid USA $39.95 

Oil filter capacitor 

10 mfri @ 2KV 3x4x5 5 lbs 
Ship pre-paid USA $15.95 

Send chEGk with orders 



J.S. BETTS 



tSBAB 



t O MP ANY 



P.O. Box 426 Fair-burn, G A 3021 3 
Phone (404J-964-3764 



Write for CATALOG 

CRAMMED WITH GOV'T SURPLUS 
ELECTRONIC GEAR send so* for handling 



A RC-5 TRANSMITTER— with all tubes and 

crystals— NEW $16.95 

AC POWER SUPPLY— for above transmitter 

completely wired & tested, NEW 128,50 

ARG-3 RECEIVER— 10Q 156 MC crystal 

controlled, excellent condition with tubes $24,50 
ARCS TRANSMITTER -100 156 MC crysta. 

controlled, excellent condition with tubes $29 50 
TG-34A CODE PRACTICE KEYER— with 

take-up reel and AC line cord, new cond. $24,50 
20O0 ohm headset , N E W $3 .95 

600 ohm headset with chamois cushions 

excellent cond, $3,95 

All types of transmitting, receiving & special purpose 

tubes available. We mviteyouf inquiries. 



Terms; F.O.B. NYC. 25% deposil wilh order, balance 
COD or remittance in full. Subject to prior sale and 
pnce change. 

GSkC Radio Electronics CO. 
45-47 WARREN ST, (2nd floor) 
NEW YORK, NY 10007 Ph. 2 1 2-267-4605 
OPEN 9am to 5 pm 



^G20 



136 



r" Reader Service— seepage IBS 




Meg INPUT 




1 Hz RES 



ON 




TCX 








C*p 




AC— DC Operation 

BMC Inputs 1 Meg Direct 50 Ohms Prescaled 

8 Large A" LED Readouts 

Auto Decimal Point & Zero Blanking 



$ 149 

MODEL 500 HH 
50 Hz — 500 MHz 



95 



MODEL 100 HH 
50 Hz — 100 MHz 



$ 99 



95 



The 100 HH and 500 HH hand held frequency counters 
represent a significant new advancement, utilizing 
the latest LSI design , , . and because its a DSI inno- 
vation, you know it obsoletes any competitive makes, 
both in price and performance. No longer do you have 
to sacrifice accuracy, ultra small readouts and poor 
resolution to get a calculator size instrument. Both 
the 100 HH and 500 HH have eight A inch LED digits 
— 1 Hz resolution — direct in only 1 sec. or 10 Hz in 
.1 sec. — 1 PPM TCXO time base. These counters are 
perfect for all applications be it mobile, hilltop, marine 
or bench work. (800— 

854-2049) (800—542-6253) 



E MORE IN 
PRODUCT LINE O: FREO 
RANGING FROM 10 Hz TC iz. 



CC 






COMPARISON CHART 






MANUFACTURER 



J$\ INSTRUMENTS 



MODEL 



100 HN 



SUGSTD. 
UST 

PRICE 



S 99.95 



FREQUENCY 
RANGE 



50Hz- 100MHz 



TYPE OF 

TIME BASE 



TCXO 



ACCURACY OVER 
TEMPERATURE 



17 *«crc 



1 PPM 



o* * 4<r c 



2 PPM 



SENSITIVITY 



100 Hz- 

250 MHz 



25 MV 



50 MHi 
250 MHZ 



NA 



250 MHz 
450 MHz 



NA 



DIGITS 



8 



SIZE IN 
INCHES 



PRE SCALE INPUT 
RESOLUTION 



i sec 



100 Hz 



1 SEC 



CONTINENTAL SPECIALTIES 



MAX 50 



$ 89.95 



100Hz-50MHz 



Noncompensated 



3 PPM @ 25* C 



SPPM 



100 MV 



NA 



NA 



I 



100 Hz 



]>Si INSTRUMENTS 



500 HH 



$149,95 



5QHZ-550MH* 



TCXO 



T PPM 



2 PPM 



25 MV 



20 MV 



30 mv 



8 



100 Hi 



10 Hz 



CONTINENTAL SPECIALTIES 



CSC-500 



$149*5 



1kHz-550MHz 



Non-Compensated 



3 PPM (Si 25° C 



a PPM 



500 MV 



250 MV 



250 MV 



NA 



I KHZ 



3PTOELECTRONJCS 



OPT-70QQ 



5139.95 



10Hz-6OOMHz 



TCXO 



1 a ppm 



3.2 PPM 



NS 



NS 



NS 



i k\ 



100 Hi 



00 HH ..-•>... i - $ 99-95 

i00 Hi $1 49.95 

Year Limited Warranty Parts 4 Labor 
actory Assembled in U.S.A. 



l J :- iil 











DSI INSTRUMENTS, INC 

7924 Ronson Road, Dept G 
San Diego. California 921 11 



T-500 Ant. $ 7,95 

AC-9 Battery Eliminator. . $ 7,95 

NfCad Batt Pack $24.95 



TERMS: MC VISA - AE - Chee* - MO - COD in U S Fund* 
Orders outside of USA & Canada, please add 520 00 additional 
cover ait shipment Ca.Morma residents add 6% Sables Tan 



■ 



Protect Yourself with a GFI 



before it's too late 



Make your hamming safer. 



C C. Lo WA6PEC 

54! 4 Barrett Ave. 
El Cerrito CA 94530 



The ground fault inter- 
rupter (GFI) has been 
around for some time Like 
many other safety devices, 



its popularity grows slowly 
because safety devices are 
not favored, as a rule. For 
an amateur radio operator, 
however, the GFI could be 
very valuable because a 
ham comes in contact with 
lots of line-operated equip- 
ment, and, inadvertently, 
some faulty equipment 



could turn up and shock 
the daylights out of him. 

The GFI described here 
will prevent a normal per- 
son from suffering severe 
shocks by turning off the 
line power in approximate- 
ly 25 rm when a fault cur- 
rent as low as 5 mA is 
detected. While 5 mA of 60 




•Lit 



Fig. 1. Schematic diagram of portable ground fault interrupter— type 311. 



Hz current will cause some 

sensation, a persistent 
10-20 mA could cause 
fibrillation of the heart 
and breathing to stop. The 
CFl can be built for 110 V 
or 220 V operation; load 
current capacity is rated at 
25 Amps. 

How it Works 

Refer to Fig. 1. The heart 
of the system is a differen- 
tial transformer, T1, which 
senses an imbalance load 
current on the two power 
lines which are wound on 
the toroid core in a bifilar 
fashion. Differential cur- 
rent as low as 5 mA will 
produce a large enough 
signal to change the output 
state of the comparator, 
U1, whose output triggers 
SCR1 P which in turn ac- 
tivates power relay K1 and 
shuts down output power. 
The whole process takes 
about 25 ms in the worst 
case. 5CR1, after being ac- 
tivated, remains on until 
the reset switch is pushed. 

The test switch is used to 



138 



DSI COMMUNICATIONS SERIES 



1.3GHz 



1GHz 



700MHz 



ost 



I 




mmi 



Frequency Cou: 



ISaOQlOQ 




MODEL C1000 10Hz to 1GHz 

• INCLUDES BATTERY PACK 

• AUTO ZERO BLANKING 

• AUTO DECIMAL POINT 

• 10MHz TIME BASE 



$49995 



MODEL C700 50Hz to 700MHz 



*369* 



INCLUDES BATTERY PACK 
AUTO ZERO BLANKING 
AUTO DECIMAL POINT 
10MHz TIME BASE 



Accuracy tha ie operational key to this rugged ad- 

vanced design Model C1000 1GHz frequency counte' a 
significant achievement from DSI. That's because you get 
.1 PPM 0" to 4Q°G proportional oven time base . . . Built 
m 25DB preamplifier with a SODB adjustable attenuator 
x10 & X100 audio scaler whiqh yields ,01 Hz resolution from 
10Hz lo SQKHz equivalent to 10 sec. & 100 sec. Gate Time 
Selectable ,1 & 1 sec. time base and 50 ohms or 1 meg ohm 
Input impedance . Built-in battery charging circuit wilt 
Rapid or le Charge Selector Color keyed high qua! 

push button operation All combined in a rugged black 

anodized (.125" thick) aluminum cabinet. The model C-1QQ0 
re* DSI's on going dedication excellence in 

instrumentation for the professional service technician, 
engineer, or > ornmunicalion industry 



ALL N ARALLELED DS! QUAL The mode! 

C 700 700 MHz frequency counter features .2 PPM 

to 40 fl C proportional oven t»me base . 25db preamplifier 
with a 60db adjustable atl >r. Bui larger 

with a rapid or triokJe charge selector Combined in a 

rugged (.125" thick) aluminum cabinet makes the C70® 
ideal for the communication industry and professional sc* 
ice technician. 

3S0OA OWNERS: Up date your 3600A frequency counter to 
a C 700 includes, new back board. .2PPM proportional oven, 
1b preamplifier, rugged ck alu im cabinet, 

order 360QA-7CKX Unit must be returned to DSI factory for 
modification 



r 



Model 



1 •■j 1,' 



C1OO0 



UARA 



Frequency 
Range 



IN* 10 700MHz 



10Hz ro 1GHz 



Proportional Oven 

Accuracy Over 

Temperature 



2PPM 0* to - 



1PPM CT to 40*0 



SQHz 
To 

75MH.J. 



■aoMV 



20MV 



75MHx 

To 
500MHz 



10MV 



~— 



1MV 



SSEM8LED - MADE 



500MH2 

To 

1GHz 



NA 



>50MV 



FOR MORE INFORMATION 

Call Toll Free (800) 854-2049 DSI Instruments Inc. 

California Exchanges Call Collect | 565-8402 
7914 Ronson Road, San Diego, C A 92111 

Atlanta (800) 242*4545 

Georgia EKChangeS^li Collect (404? 977-2225 
S3 Old Stone MM Road, Atlanta, GA 30067 



Number 

Of 
Digits 



8 

9 



Size 

Of 

Digits 



.5 inch 



PQWQt 

Requirements 



.5 Inch 



/AOBA 
8lo 15VD> 



H5VAC-8ATf 
B to 1 SVDC 






3"H x 8'"W x 6" D 



■SJU .VIVMW 



.^ , 



1Q"W D 




arra 



Model C 700 



S369.95 



3600A-700 Factory Update (3600A only) 
Includes Labor & Re-Calibration $199.95 



Model C 1000 

Opt. 01 1.3 GHz (C1000only) 



$499.95 
$ 99.95 



Opt. 02 .05 PPM 10MHz Double Oven 
0° to 50° C Time Base (C1000 only) $129.95 

Ant. 210 Telescopic Ant./BNC Adapter $11.95 




Parts List 



Photo A 



simulate a fault current of 
5 mA for testing purpose. It 
is a good practice to test 
the system by the test 
switch prior to the use of 
the CFI. The neon light is 
used to indicate a fault and 
power-down condition. 

For 22Q-V operation, a 
220-V socket must be used 
for PCI; R1 must be 
changed from 22k to 43k; 
R2 must be changed from 

1 k (2 W) to 7.5 M10W), and 

R3 must be changed from 

10k (10 W) to 25k [10 W). 
The CFI described was 
tested in close proximity to 
a high-power radio fre- 
quency transmitter and 
was found to be RFI-proof. 

Construction 

The complete system is 
housed in a 5" x 6" x 9" 
steel box, Photo A shows 
the CFI and Photo B shows 
the component layout. A 
printed circuit board is 
used to contain all elec- 
tronics components. The 
switches, relay, light, fuse, 
and socket are all mounted 
on the front panel, but a 
barrier terminal block is 
mounted on the inside of 
the side wall of the box for 
connection to the power 
line cord. 

Operation Hints 

If the CFI keeps shutting 
off with a certain load, it in- 
dicates that the load or the 
wiring to the load has a 
short which provides the 



fault (leakage) current to 
trip the CFI; such a fault 
must be sought out and 
corrected before the tool 
or the equipment is used 
In some cases, even a very 
low current would do 
damage to certain persons; 
hence, by no means should 
a person subject himself or 
herself to any test shock. 
All common sense and 
carefulness must be exer- 
cised when electrical 
power is involved; the first 
mistake could also be the 
last. ■ 



R1 


22k (1 10 V), 43k {220 V), both V* W 


R2 


1k (110 V) 2 W, 7.5k (220 V), 10 W 


R3 


10k (110 V), 25k (220 V), both 10 W 


R4 


100k ft W 


R5, 6, 7 


1k V4 W 


R8 


100 y* w 


R9 


100k v* w 


R10 


22k V* W 


R11 


2k Y4 W 


R12 


1k % W 


C1 


4uF450 V electrolytic 


C2 


47 uF 20' V electrolytic 


C3, 4 


.1 uF 25 V disc 


CR1,2 


1N4006 


CR3 r 4, 5 


1N914 


CR6 


1N4742 12 Vzener diode 


SCR 


2N2328 


F1 


Fuse holder and 25 Amp fuse 


U1 


LM311 IC 


SW1 


SPST N.CX 


SW2 


SPST N,C, 


NE1 


Neon lamp and holder 


K1 


Relay 110 V coil, 25 Amp or 30 Amp contacts DPDT 


T1 


Differential transformer 


PC311 


Printed circuit board 


Chassis box 


5 ' X 6" X 9"steel box with handle 


The following are available: 


GFI kit 


110 V type311-K $55.95 




220 V type 31 2 K $65.95 


Assembled GFI 110 V type 311 $70.95 




220 V type 312 $80.95 



(an above plus $5-00 shipping and handling) 
PC board $10.00 ppd 

Relay $16.00 ppd 

Transformer T1 $13.50 ppd 

To order, send check or money order to: LOTRONICS t PO Box 975, 
El Cerrito CA 94530 (allow 3-4 weeks for delivery). 







Photo B, 



140 



YOU ASKED FOR IT 

YOU GOT IT 



50 HZ 



ualftTI 



550 MHZ COUNTER KIT 



95% ASSEMBLED 100% TESTED 

Performance You Can Count On 






FREQUENCY COUNTER APPLICATION: 

• Ham Radio — Two Way Radio — CB 

* Audio Amplifier & Receiver Repair 
Computer Maintenance & Construction 
A Must for TV — PLL & VTR Repair 



$99 



95 



MODEL 3550K 



includes built-in 
Pre-Amp & Prescaler 





DSI OFFERS THE BEST OF TWO WORLDS . . ■ 

An unprecedented DSI VALUE . u in a high quality, LSI Design, 
50 HZ to 550 MHZ frequency counter kit. And, because it's 
a DSI innovation, you know it obsoletes all competitive 
makes, both in price & performance, 

With 95% of the assembly completed by DSI, you are only 
one hour away from solving all of those difficult bench 
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Poor Man's CW Memory 

— works even with a straight key 



Thanks, Elmer! 



Eric Unruh WBBR YN 
RL 2 t Box 56A 
Newton KS 671 14 

A dog may be a man's 
best friend, but for the 
CWer, a memory for his 
keyer has got to come in a 



close second. A memory 
makes everyday operating 
much easier and more en- 
joyable, and is almost in- 
dispensable during a con- 
test. It's a worthwhile addi- 
tion to any ham's station. 

Why, then, do so few 
hams have them? "Well, 
my keyer is an oddball 



design; I don't have access 
to a free-running oscillator 
in order to synchronize it 
to the memory"; or, "I just 
use a straight key/' 

I had the same objec- 
tions, but at the 1977 Field 
Day, a friend in my club, 
Elmer Watts K0HAO, told 
me that he had designed a 



T404 



*404 




Fig, 1. The basic circuit 



memory that would work 
with any keyer— even a 
straight key! I was so 
delighted with my version 
of his design that I asked 
for permission to write it 
up. This is the result- 
Most of the previous 
memories were designed to 
work with only one keyer 
or type of keyer, as the two 
had to be synchronized. 
That is, the oscillator on 
the keyer had to be exactly 
in step with the oscillator 
on the memory in order for 
a dot to be stored in one 
memory location and a 
dash in exactly three. One 
got perfectly-spaced CW 
out of such a memory, but 
it was tricky to build. What 
makes this memory unique 
is that you don't have to 
synchronize it with another 
oscillator 

The secret of this 
memory is in clocking it 
at a much higher rate 
than the keying speed. 
Dits are then stored in a 
number of memory loca- 
tions, not just one, and 
dahs are stored in approx- 
imately three times as 
many locations as are the 



142 



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§^ Reader S&rvtcvse* page 195 



143 



dits. Running the memory 
in such a fashion destroys 
the perfect 1 to 3 ratio of a 
well-adjusted keyer, but 
the output of the memory 
is so close (1 to 2.9 or 3.1) 
that even the most critical 
ear can't tell the differ- 
ence. The memory space 
certainly is not used in the 
most efficient way, but the 
advantage is that it can be 
used with nearly all keyers r 
bugs, straight keys, or side- 
swipers. 

The basic circuit is shown 
in Fig, 1. It is straight- 
forward and unbelievably 
simple. The heart of the cir- 
cuit is two 2102 1 K x 1 static 
RAM memory chips, for a 
total of 2K or 2048 bits of 
memory. They are wired up 
in parallel, pin for pin, ex- 
cept for pin 13, the memory- 
enable pin More on this 
later. 

A 555 timer is wired up in 
the astable multivibrator 
mode and clocks three 
7493s r which are 4-bit binary 
counters. The speed of the 
clock can be varied by 
means of the 25k pot. The 
7493s provide the ten ad- 
dress lines needed to ad- 
dress the 2102s (2™ = 1024 
bits per chip). As we said 
before, the 2102s are in 
parallel except for the ME 
pins, because we want to 
enable only one chip at a 
time (A logic on the ME 
line enables the chip, while 
a logic 1 disables it.) This is 
accomplished by using an 
inverter section connected 
to pin 8 of the last 7493 In 
the starting position, where 
Aq through A9 = 0, ME1 
will be low, ME2 will be 
high, and the first memory 
chip will be enabled 1024 
bits later, the first chip will 
have been addressed fully 
Pin 8 on the 7493 will then 
switch high, ME1 and ME2 
exchange logic levels, and 
the second memory chip 
will be enabled. In this way, 
both chips are used to their 
full capacity The LEDs are 
there to give visual indica- 
tion of when one memory 
has been cycled through 



and the other is starting 

Incoming data to the 
2102s is fed through two in- 
verters to pin 11 and can 
be keyed by any method in 
which key-down is repre- 
sented by a logic 0. Al- 
though the two inverters 
look redundant, they are 
there for a reason, The Dl 
pins tend to assume a low 
state if left floating. Since 
logic — key-down in this 
circuit, this can't be tol- 
erated; the two inverter 
sections are there to pull 
the Dl pins high in the 
absence of an incoming 
signal 

Data-Out is available at 
pin 12. The two inverters 
and the capacitor follow- 
ing it are for shaping pur- 
poses. A switch, 52, is pro- 
vided to allow the operator 
to choose between using 
the message stored in 
memory or using the key 
without going through the 
memory. Note, also, that 
the output drives a side- 
tone oscillator, another 
555 in the astable mode. A 
switch, S5, is provided to 
shut off the audio tone 
when the memory is not in 
use 54, the Reset switch, 
resets the memory to the 
starting point by bringing 
all the address lines to 
logic 0. SI, the Read/Write 
switch, controls whether or 
not data is written into the 
memory or is available at 
the output. The Erase 
switch brings one end of 
the 1.0-uF capacitor up 
from ground to a logic one 
when pushed, allowing the 
555 clock to run at its top 
speed, around 200 kHz, 
The memory chips cycle 
through in just a fraction of 
a second, and if the Read/ 
Write switch is in the Write 
position, it will clear the 
entire 2K of memory. 

It should be noted that 
this diagram does not pro- 
vide a way to key the trans- 
mitter, as different trans- 
mitters use different key- 
ing methods. Circuits for 
keying the two most 
popular types of transmit- 
ters (grid-block and 






zwaasfi 



IN fl- 






If 



ff/ 



€> 



310 

-rV- 



HQfl 



c 



-4 ■ 50OV 



+ 5V 



1 



fh 



m 



S002S 



IT 



6/ 



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€5 



-300V 






•9V 




Fig. 2 (a) Cathode keying, (b) Grid block. 



cathode-keyed) are shown 
in Fig. 2. 

Construction can be as 
simple or as elegant as you 
desire, A well-regulated 
5-voIt supply should be 
used with adequate filter- 
ing. I have added 47-uF ca- 
pacitors across the supply 
to the 555s; these should 
be placed as close to the 
555s as is physically possi- 
ble. 555s tend to generate a 
lot of garbage and glitches, 
and extra bypassing is 
needed to prevent these 
from being sent on down 
the line. Bypass capacitors 
on the order of 01 or so 
should be placed across 
the supply near all the rest 
of the chips, also; this is 
simply common sense 
when working with TTL and 
was not shown on the sche- 
matic. 

As seven inverter sec- 
tions are used, two 7404 
chips are required- Any 
unused sections should 
have their inputs tied to 
ground. 

The easiest way to 
parallel the two 2102s is 
simply to stack one on top 
of the other and solder the 
pins together. While it is 
surprising how much heat 
they can stand, don't over- 
do it; try to use a small 
soldering iron and solder 
quickly. Remember not to 
solder the ME pins to- 
gether. 

If one desires control 
over the pitch of the 
sidetone oscillator, the 
1 -megohm resistor on the 
555 can be replaced with a 
trimmer pot. 

Operation is simple. 
Turn the Memory/Key 
switch to the Memory posi- 



tion, turn the Read/Write 
switch to the Write posi- 
tion, turn the Audio switch 
on, reset the memories, 
and key in the message you 
want. When you're fin- 
ished, switch the memory 
back to read and reset it 
Your message should play 
back. 

If the message is dis- 
torted, this means that the 
memory clock is not run- 
ning high enough as com* 
pared with the keying rate. 
Either advance the clock 
rate or slow down your 
fist r and try again. Even- 
tually, you will find a 
speed fast enough so that 
the message is recorded 
undistorted. The memory 
should be running as slow 
as possible, without distor- 
tion, in order to get a 
longer message into mem- 
ory. Of course, once the 
message is in the memory, 
you can play it back at any 
speed you wish by simply 
varying the memory clock 
speed. Maybe this ac- 
counts for some of the 60 
wpm plus signals we hear 
on the air! 

Total cost for this mem- 
ory is ridiculously low, with 
the most expensive com- 
ponents being the five 
switches. The 2102s are 
available nearly every- 
where for under $2 each, 
7493s under a buck apiece, 
555s for 50 cents, and the 
7404s for the whopping 
sum of a dime per chip. It 
really is a poor man's 
memory! 

I hope you like the 
memory as much as I did 
I'll be glad to answer any 
and all questions if you 
send me an 5A5E,B 



144 



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Power Up for Mobile Operation 



adding an auxiliary battery 



Wiring a winner. 



It certainly puts a damper 
on the pleasures of 
mobile operation if you 
have to worry that the next 
push of the mike button 
will drain the battery to the 
point where the car will not 
start. It kind of spoils the 
fun of having that new 
super linear that draws 100 
Amps from the battery on 
transmit doesn't it? 

What is there to do 
about it? You could, of 
course, keep the engine 
running while you are 
operating, but that wastes 
gas if you are not in mo- 
tion. A better solution is to 
connect your radio equip- 
ment to an auxiliary bat- 
tery—a separate battery 
that is charged by the alter- 
nator when the engine is 
running, but is disconnect- 
ed and isolated from the 
main or starting battery 
when the engine is 
stopped. That way, you can 
run the auxiliary battery 
down even to the point of 

STARTER 
RELAY 




O 



total discharge, with the 
main battery remaining 
charged and ready to start 
the engine. 

Furthermore, there is a 
wide variety of electrical 
appliances, ranging from 
refrigerators to bed warm- 
ers, that can enhance the 
comfort of Mving in a van 
or camper. Again, you can 
get the most out of these 
conveniences only if you 
don't have to worry about 
running down the starting 
battery- Large motor 
homes and other recrea- 
tional vehicles are all 
equipped with auxiliary 
batteries. They are 
available as optional 
equipment in some makes 
of vans and in most makes 
of pickup trucks. One can 
be added, using after- 
market components, to 
any vehicle that has room 
for an extra battery. 

As a point of reference 
for the following discus- 
sion, Fig. 1 shows a simpli- 



AMMETER 



<3> 



MAIN 
BATTERY 



f ROM 

IGNITION 

SWITCH 



MLLD 




ffl 




ROWER TO 
> VEHICLE 
CIRCUITS 



OUTPUT 



fied view of the normal car 
or truck electrical system, 
specifically, the part 
devoted to charging the 
battery. You can see how 
the alternator provides 
power to the vehicle cir- 
cuits and charges the bat- 
tery through the ammeter, 
The alternator field is sup- 
plied by the regulator, 
which receives power 
through the ignition switch 
and senses the voltage that 
it receives. 

To install an auxiliary 
battery, you must first find 
room for it. Some vans and 
most pickup trucks have 
room under the hood. For 
these, battery trays are 
commercially available for 
about $10. Some cars 
might also accommodate 
an extra battery under the 
hood. 

If there is not room 
under the hood r you can in- 
stall the battery in the 

STARTER 
BELAY 



O 




MAIN 
8ATTERY 



FROM 

IGNITION > 
j W I TC H 



trunk of a car or under a 
bed or within a cabinet in a 
van. The space occupied 
by the battery shoufd be 
vented to the outside to 
prevent accumulation of 
the hydrogen gas given off 
by the battery when it is be- 
ing charged. Plastic battery 
boxes are available at 
trailer supply stores. These 
are useful for protecting 
the battery and for keeping 
battery acid off other 
things. 

You must, of course, 
have a battery, An ordinary 
car battery will do nicely 
and is commonly supplied 
when an auxiliary battery is 
ordered with a new vehi- 
cle. However, it is not op- 
timal for this application. 
An ordinary car battery is 
designed for so-called 
"floating" service, where it 
is kept continually at or 
near full charge by the 
alternator and only dis- 



AMMETEft 

a 





ISOLATFQW 
RELAY 




TO ALTERNATOR 
— > AND VEHKILE 
CIRCUITS 



POWER TO RAEJJO 
^ EOUJPMENT AMD 
APPLIANCES 



AUXILIARY 
BATTERY 



/77 



Fig. J. Simplified circuit of automobile electrical system, 



Fig. 2. Auxiliary battery with relay isolator. 



146 



STARTER 

RELAY 



o 




AMMETER 



<3> 



MAIN 

BATTERY 



L 

/ 



THIS WIRE OfiNSrNALLY 
WENT TO ALTERNATOR 
OUTPUT 



/ 



$<*. I ESTATE 
tSOLATOfl 



povtn to 

-> VEHICLE 

crncuiTs 




WtPwt 



FROM 

I&NITPON >- 
SWITCH 



REGULATOR 



f L^r, 



® 



m 




AUXILIARY 
BATTERY 



Fig. 3, Auxiliary battery with solid state isolator. 



charges a small fraction of 
its capacity by the normal 
engine start. 

An auxiliary battery, in 
contrast, is subject to so- 
called "cycling" service, 
where it may discharge a 
large fraction tor all) of its 
capacity, if not complete- 
ly, when electrical equip- 
ment is used with the vehi- 
cle and the engine off. (The 
discharge and subsequent 
recharge by the alternator 
constitute a "cycle" in bat- 
tery parlance.) This sort of 
service is hard on a battery 
and hastens its deteriora- 
tion by such occurrences 
as the shedding of active 
material from the plates. A 
battery that is designed for 
cycling-say, a marine bat- 
tery such as the Sears Die- 
Hard Marine — will cost 
more than a car battery, 
but will last longer in this 
type of service. 

The final item you will 
need is an isolator, whose 
function is to disconnect 
the auxiliary battery from 
the main battery when the 
engine is not running This 
is available from recrea- 
tional vehicle supply 
stores. Be sure to get an 
isolator with a current 
rating equal to or greater 
than the output rating of 
your alternator. 

There are two types of 
isolator— relay and solid 
state. The relay isolator is 
the cheaper of the two, so 
(naturally) it is always used 
when the auxiliary battery 
is put on the vehicle at the 
factory. A diagram of the 
arrangement is shown in 
Fig. 2. It consists simply of 



a contactor relay (looking 
something like a starter 
relay) that connects the 
auxiliary battery in parallel 
with the main battery when 
the ignition is on. The aux- 
iliary battery then receives 
a charge. When the ignition 
is off, the relay opens and 
the auxiliary battery is 
isolated, 

This is a workable ar- 
rangement, but it has three 
disadvantages. First, if the 
load on the auxiliary bat- 
tery while the engine is run- 
ning exceeds the alternator 
capacity, current will be 
drawn from the main bat- 
tery. Second, if the two bat- 
teries are at different 
states of charge, heavy cur- 
rents will flow from the 
stronger one in to the 
weaker one when the igni- 
tion is turned on. Finally, 
the relay contacts are sub- 
ject to deterioration 

The solid state isolator 
avoids these disadvan- 
tages. As purchased from a 
recreational vehicle supply 
store, it looks like a very 
mysterious box with cool- 
ing fins on the outside and 
the internal workings inac- 
cessible. It costs about 
$25, However, as shown in 
Fig, 3, all there is to it is a 
pair of high-power diodes 
mounted on a heat sink. 
The anodes of the diodes 
are both connected to the 
output terminal of the 
alternator, while the 
cathodes are connected to 
the two batteries. Thus, 
current can flow from the 
alternator to both bat- 
teries, but not from one 
battery to the other. The 



■ ROM MAIN 
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circuits: 



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CONNECTIONS 



J 



-> 



*— • 



■>J 



TO LIGHT 

5*1 TCH AND 
EVE RV THING 

ELSE 



FROM 

AUXILIARY 

*ATTE«T 



Fig. 4. Powering vehicle circuits horn auxiliary battery, 



regulator continues to 
sense the voltage of the 

main battery and thus com- 
pensates for the diode 
drop. 

You can save a little 
money by making your 
own isolator. Simply pro- 
cure two diodes with cur- 
rent ratings equal to or 
greater than your alter- 
nator output rating. The 
lowest voltage rating of- 
fered, commonly 50 volts, 
is adequate. Mount them 
on a heat sink (with ade- 
quate insulation of course) 
and hook them up. 

To install the solid state 
isolator, find a place to 
mount it near the alter- 
nator. Remove the heavy 
wire from the alternator 
output terminal and con- 
nect it to one side terminal 
(i.e., one diode cathode) of 
the isolator. (This wire will 
carry charging current to 
the main battery ) Prepare 
a new heavy lead and con- 
nect it between the alter- 
nator output terminal and 
the center terminal of the 
isolator (i.e,, the two diode 
anodes). Connect the re- 
maining side terminal to 
the auxiliary battery. 

Whenever you do any 
electrical installation work 
of this type, it should go 
without saying that you 
first disconnect the ground 
cables from both the main 
and auxiliary batteries. 
Otherwise, expensive fire- 
works will occur. 

Use number 10 or heav- 
ier wire for the power con- 
nections between the alter- 
nator, isolator, and bat- 
teries. A kit of crimp-type 
terminals is extremely 
useful for this sort of job. 

Once you have an aux- 



iliary battery, you can get a 
lot more benefit from it by 
rewiring the vehicle elec- 
trical system so that the 
lights and other acces- 
sories are connected to the 
auxiliary battery, and only 
the items controlled by the 
ignition switch remain con- 
nected to the main battery. 
That way, you won't have 
to worry about running 
down the main battery if 
you leave the lights on, 
either inadvertently or for 
safety, or if you plug 
something into the cigar 
lighter socket on the dash- 
board. 

Because of the wide vari- 
ations in the details of car 
and truck electrical sys- 
tems, I can present only 
general guidelines for mak- 
ing this change. See Fig, 4 
Start by studying your vehi- 
cle's wiring diagram, Look 
for a splice where the main 
power wire from the bat- 
tery, ammeter, and alter- 
nator branches out to the 
ignition switch, light 
switch, and other acces- 
sories such as the cigar 
lighter (possibly passing 
through the fuse box on the 
way), Cut all wires away 
from this splice exeept the 
ignition switch wire and 
the feed wire from the bat- 
tery. Connect the wires you 
have cut loose to the aux- 
iliary battery. 

Normally, vehicles with 
auxiliary batteries have not 
been wired in this way, (My 
van is probably the only 
one until this article ap- 
pears.) Making the change 
will, in all likelihood, in- 
volve you in working with 
the tangle of wires under 
the dashboard, but the 
results are well worth it. I 



14? 



Project Update 

doubled capacity for K20AW's repeater IDer 



Peter A . Stark K2QA W 

PO Box 209 

Aft. Kisco NY 10549 



Just add three ICs. 



Quite a tew repeaters 
around the country 
are using the K20AW 
repeater control and CW 
identifier published in 73 



Magazine, February and 
March, 1973. 

The identifier used a sim- 
ple diode matrix for 
memorizing a call con- 



sisting of up to 32 dits, 
dahs, and spaces. That was 
sufficient even for long 
repeater calls such as 
WR2XXX. But the FCC 



ICS FIN I3<GI) 
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ADDED CW lD'tR 



F/g. t. CW identifier as modified for 64 tf/ode positions. 



148 



The Sangre de Cnslo Mountains " ETO S backyard 



WHY WISH YOU'D 




ALPHA? 



■rf^*S 



MiAnimrt* 




IS SOMETHING ELSE "JUST AS GOOD? 

New ALPHA owners often tell us. "I wish id saved my time and money and bought an ALPHA in the first place.' 
Why not benefit from their experiences? Compare first! 

TRY TO GET ANY OTHER MANUFACTURER TO TELL YOU - IN WRITING - THAT IT'S SAFE TO OPERATE HIS 
DESK TOP LINEAR AT A FULL DC KILOWATT . . . SAY FOR 24 HOURS KEY-DOWN, OR, ASK HIM FOR A FULL 
YEAR WRITTEN WARRANTY. LOTS OF LUCK! 

YOUR NEW ALPHA WILL HAPPILY AND COOLY RUN THAT KILOWATT KEY-DOWN . . . FOR 24 DAYS IF YOU 
WISH. AND YOU'LL BE PROTECTED BY ETO'S UNMATCHED WARRANTY FOR TWO YEARS. WE PUT IT IN 
WRITING ALL THE TIME. IT'S THE WAY WE BUILD AND WARRANT EVERY ALPHA I 



The new ALPHA'S are the best we've ever buiit 
Nothing else even approaches an Alpha's combina- 
tion of power, convenience, quality, and owner protec* 
lion. The ETO/ ALPHA two year limited warranty offers 
you eight times as much protection as the industry- 
standard 90 day warranty. 

The new ALPHA 3 744 adds NO-TUN£*UP operation 
to all the other tradilionaf ALPHA qualities and capa- 
bilities. You can hop instantly from one HF band to 
another, with full maximum legal power and with little 
or no amplifier tune-up at all! (If new amateur bands 
are added, you can manually adjust your ALPHA to 
work them, too.) 



In 1974 the original ALPHA 374 seta standard of high 
power convenience that has remained unmatched 
since. Despite its small size, not even one "374 owner 
ever burned out a power transformer. Impressive? The 
new '374A has an even huskier power supply. And it 
has ETO's ducted-air system with acousiicallynsolated 
centrifugal blower to insure cool, whisper-quiet 
Operation 

Before you get serious about any other brand of Jinear. 
compare its convenience and quality, its transformer 
heft, itscoofmg system efficiency and noise level - and 
its warranty ■ with the ALPHA'S. Be sure to ask around 
about its reputation 

Call or write for detailed literature and thoroughly 
check out ail the great new ALPHA 's , . so you don t 
make a mistake. 



EHRHORN TECHNOLOGICAL OPERATIONS. INC. 
BOX 708, CANON CITY, CO 81212 (303) 275-1613 



recently changed the 
rules — no new WR calls 
will be issued and in- 
dividual calls followed by 
/RPT are to be used Now, 
even a simple call such as 
K2EEE/RPT is too long to 
fit into the 32-bit limita- 
tion. 

Snort of designing a 
completely new identifier, 
the easiest solution for 
repeaters which must 
change to the new call 
system is to simply add 



three new TTL integrated 
circuits as shown in Fig. 1. 

The three new ICs are 
IC4B, IC5B, andlC6B IC5B 
and IC6B are connected ex- 
actly the same as ICS and 
IC6 on the original board 
and extend the diode 
matrix to 64 bits. Diode 
matrix wiring is exactly the 
same as before, with 
diodes scanned from left 
to right. 

IC4B is a new flip-flop 
which is connected be- 



tween the two halves of the 
old IC4 to extend the 
counter from 5 bits (which 
would access 32 diodes) to 
6 bits (to access 64 diodes). 
The wiring to the C1 (pin 
19) and C2 (pin 18) inputs 
to all four 74154 decoders 
is now different. 

The new ICs and diodes 
can be installed on a per- 
forated board which con- 
nects to the original 
printed circuit board with 
11 wires, counting +5-volt 



power and ground. I also 
have several of the original 
identifier boards, which I 
will be happy to sell ($7 
each) to anyone who would 
like to mount the new 
board piggyback above the 
old one. 

So, if you have to change 
your repeater's call, go 
ahead and make this mod- 
ification. It's a lot easier to 
modify the present iden- 
tifier than to start all 
over ■ 



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Dept 73. 17 Washington St., Rensselaer, N.Y. 12144 

DISTRIBUTOR INQUIRIES INVITED 
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ELECTRONIC PARTS ^ClOS 



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PUT rT RIGHT WHERE YOU WANT H. 
WiiH one hand, raise (he lower from 21 to 
as high as 55 + . Find exactly the right re 
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exception of our breakover models, this is 
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BREAKOVERS— THE ULTIMATE IN CON 
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TOWER CONSTRUCTION, We make U out 
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350 pounds for 55". Several design Inncva 
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ONE-PIECE PRICE. When you buy one of 
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Concrete sleeves available for Model 40s 
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P.O. Box 3412 • Enid, Oklahoma 73701 

405*233-4412 

**T52 



your MOST CALLED NUMBERS 



WITH THE AD-1 



Proven Reliability 

Mode Switch positively identifies 

manual^au to-prog ram operation 

Log cal programming and 

operating sequences eliminates 

need for constant reference to 

programming instructions 

Single button, single handed 

dialing for most operations 

Speaker audio eliminates 

operating errors and instills user 

confidence 

Amateur net $89.95 

UV-3 owners add $5.00 for AD-1/UV3 



or the NEW AD-1 P 



AUTO-DIALER 







f&r ^ 






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Portable auto-dialer! 

Acoustic Coupling for microphone 

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Infernal Nicad rechargeable 

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Battery Charger included 

8 permanent numbers stored in 
custom prom (available for $4.95) 

Includes all features of AD-1 
except interfacing 
Amateur net price $89.95 
$119.95 with batteries and charger 



or make your own Auto Dialer 

Using the J^£k 197701 microcomputer chip 



• Comes with matching resistor 
network, suggested auto dialer 
schematic and operator instructions 

• Amateur net price $29.95 

• Wired and tested printed circuit 
board with chip set available 
for $49 95 

• 12 button key pad available for $9.95 



-J> 



For more information, contact your favorite deafer or the factory 



ADVANCED ELECTRONIC APPLICATIONS, INC. 
P.O. Box 2160, Lynn wood, WA 98036 A94 

206-775-7373 

Prices and specifications subject to change without notice 



t^ Reader Service— see page 195 



151 



r 



3/4 KILOWATT DC INPUT 
ALL MODE VHF AMPLIFIER 



^ 



SPECIFICATIONS: 



Frequency Rang» 
Power Output, Max 
Circuit ry 
Modes of Operation 

Duty Cycle 

G«in. Typical: 
©Watts Input 
1 2 Watts Input 
1 5 Watts Input 

T/Ft Swrtctwig 



HM(W Output 



Tempe^tuf? Control 
Au^hflfy OuipuT 
D*s4gn Layout 

Woighi 

Sizo (WxHkO) 

Mounting 



Carina triors 

USA Price 







1 44. 14BMH2. No Tuning 
350 ID 400 WHtts 
Fully Transistorized 
AM-FMSSBCW-RTTY 
Continuous Dutv 

300 Watts Output 
360 Watts Output 
400 Wa us Output 

tJurft m AC Power Supprv 1 1S/230 VAC 

Bu4t^n 1 KW CosbslT^ R***v 

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Front Panel AD Mod* S«flrK*c*«or 

Convection SSB and C W 

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53 pounds; 24 kilograms 

1 7 j( B k 1 3": 432 x 203 x 330 mm 

Bench Muunting, Rubber Bumpers 

Rafik Mounting, 19" Adaptor Kit (OPTiONAU 

5Q239-UHF 

$895,00 FOB Factory , Fan K tt $59.00 



RF POWER LABS, INC. ^ 




MODEL: V350 



FOR BASE STATION 

& 
REPEATL.l USE 




POWER 11dlJ.11WiPI«eN £• KnMwie,W»i«flgion 9W33 - TMmwninei 8221251 ■ TELEXNo 321042 
LABS 




THE SMART CHOICE IN 

REPEATER CONTROL 

Now with three exciting new features: 




• Long Distance Calling 

• Autodialing 

• Remotely selectable 
timeout limits 



IMAGINE A CONTROLLER — 
SO VERSATILE tt provides four differ- 
ent classes of output functions In Addi- 
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SO RESPONSIVE It sends thirteen 
Morse codded messages to keep you 
fully Informed. Messages like BZ If you 

try to access a busy aulopatch line, 

SO ADVANCED It uses micro proces- 
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tone decoding, 

SO PERSONALIZED that many 
features are custom programmed to 
accommodate your unique needs. 

SO EASY it can be Installed In minutes 
wltfi only five essential connections. 



^M69 



NOW Imagine automatic dialing of 
emergency telephone numbers, long 
distance autopatch calling under control 
op supervision, plus remotely command* 
able timeout limits to match various 
operating conditions and you've just 
Imagined the MARK 3C. 

The MARK 3C Is a complete control 
system with all audio and logic circuitry, 
status display, and power supply In one 
handsome cabinet. Its third generation 
design can replace racks ol hardwired 
equipment white giving vastly expanded 
capability. 

Gel the field- proven power mat only • 
MARK 3C can give at $995, (100% 
factory assembled and tested) 



Call or Write for specifications 

MICRO CONTROL SPECIALITIES (617) 372-3442 

23 Elm Park, Groveland, Ma. 01834 



BARGAIN 




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INTERNATIONALE! 



I 



13401 South Hoover Street 
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^Asa 



152 



*** Reader Service— see page 195 



SST T-4 

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153 



/Microcomputer 
Interfacing 



from pjge ?4 

programs back into memory. In 
any case, when errors are 
found, you will probably want to 
reedif and reassemble the soft- 
ware to produce a complete, 
error-free, documented listing, 
Since most programs will 
contain errors, it may be a good 
idea to have the debug program 
as a permanent part of your 
computer. The storage ol a 



debug-type program in read- 
only memory (ROM or PROM) is 
wise since "runaway" programs 
being tested might alter the 
debug software, causing you to 
have to load it again. There 
are many debug or monitor pro- 
grams available, with Intel Cor- 
poration's Insite software li- 
brary listing at least Four. The 
editor/assembler programs may 
also be resident in PROM, and 
the low cost of both read/write 



memory and PROM chips sug- 
gests that many users will keep 
standard system programs 
such as editors, assemblers, 
and debug resident in their 
systems. The alternative is a 
paper tape, cassette, or disk^ 
based software package which 
must be read into memory be- 
fore each use. 

There are also cross-assem- 
blers which will generate an 
assembled program, but for 
some other computer. For ex- 
ample, a PDP-11 might be able 
to cross-assemble 8080 micro- 
computer programs. Cross- 
assemblers can be powerful 
programs, since some incor- 
porate simulation programs to 



test the program, too. 

The program we use for test- 
ing programs is DBUG written 
by Dr, Chris Titus/ and the 
assembler output shown in our 
program examples is that pro- 
duced by the Tyehon Editor/As- 
sembler (TEA). Both are resi- 
dent In our 8080 system on 
PROM chips. 




'"DBUG, An B0&0 Interpretive Debug- 
ger," Titus, C.A ., E& I Instruments. 
Inc., Derby CT 06418, 1977. 



Contests 



from page 18 

band at the same time, 
EXCHANGE: 

OM stations send RS(T) plus 
2 digits denoting the operator's 
age; YL stations send RS(T) plus 
00. 

SCORING: 

For non-Asian stations: Score 
1 point per Asian QSO; multi- 
plier is the number of different 
Asian prefixes worked on each 
band according to WPX rules. 
Asian stations score 1 potnt per 
non-Asian QSO; multiplier is the 
number of different countries in 
the world worked on each band 
according io the DXCC coun^ 
tries list. 

Note; JD1 stations on 
Ogasawara (Benin and Vol- 
cano) islands belong to Asia, 
JD1 stations on Minamitori 
Shima (Marcus) Island belong 
to Oceania. Contacts among 
Asian stations and among non- 
Asian stations will not count for 
QSO points or multipliers. Con- 
tacts with KA stations are not 
eligible] They are considered 
not amateur, but military! 
ENTRIES AND AWARDS: 

Please use official contest 
log and summary sheets or 
other similar forms. Please keep 
all times in GMT and fill up the 
blanks of "multiplier' 1 by the 
countries or prefixes only the 
first time on each band. A num- 
ber of awards will be issued 
depending on the number of en- 
tries from each country in each 
class. Disqualification may re- 
sult for violation of the contest 
rules, false statement in the 
report, or taking points for 
duplicate contacts on the same 
band in excess of 2% by the 
total. The log and summary 
sheet must arrive together at 
JARL, PO Box 377, Tokyo Cen- 
tral, Japan, on or before the 
following dates: phone— Sep- 
tember 30th; CW— November 



30th. You may have contest 
results by enclosing one IRC 
and SAE with your log. 

WEST VIRGINIA QSO PARTY 
Starts: 2300 June 16 
Ends: 2300 June 17 

All amateur radio operators 
are invited to participate In this 
year's party sponsored by the 
West Virginia State Amateur 
Radio Council. The same sta- 
tion may be worked on different 
bands for additional points. On- 
ly one contact with each station 
per band may be counted for 
scoring. West Virginia stations 
may work each other. 
EXCHANGE: 

QSO number, RS(T), and WVA 
county or state/country. 
SCORING: 

Out-of-state stations multiply 
the number of eligible QSOs 
with WVA stations by the 
number of different WVA coun- 
ties worked- This total is then 
multiplied by the power multi- 
plier indicated below. WVA sta- 
tions multiply the number of 
eligible QSOs by the sum of the 
different WVA counties, states, 
and countries worked. This total 
is then multiplied by the power 
multiplier: dc input of 200 
Watts or less, multiply by 1.5; 
dc input of 201 Watts to legal 
limit, multiply by 1.0. 

ENTRIES & AWARDS: 

To be eligible for an award, a 
station may have only one un- 
assisted operator and logs 
must contain a minimum of 50 
valid contacts (20 for Novices). 
Logs must be received no later 
than July 15th and logs will not 
be returned. Logs must indicate 
the date, time, QSO number; 
callsign, their QSO number, 
signal report, and county/state/ 
country or station worked, 
mode, and band. Awards will be 
issued as follows: highest-scor- 
ing WVA resident, 1st runner-up 
WVA resident, 2nd runner-up 



WVA resident, highest-scoring 
Novice WVA resident, highest- 
scoring station from each state, 
highest-scoring station from 
each country, and highest- 
scoring Novice from each state. 
Decision of the Contest Com- 
mittee of the WVA State ARC 
will be final Logs should be 
sent to: West Virginia QSO Par- 
ty, PO Box 36, Seneca Rocks 
WV 26884. Suggested operating 
frequencies are 35 kHz inside 
each CW band and 10 kHz in- 
side the general portion of each 
phone band. 

7-LAND QSO PARTY 

Starts: 1200 GMT June 30 
Ends: 2400 GMT July 1 

This is the second annua) 
QSO Party sponsored by the 
NAS Whidbey Island ARC. The 
7-iand area includes the & US 
call district states, the VE7 call 
area of Canada, and the KL7 
area of Alaska. 

Operating time is limited to 
30 of the 36 contest hours. The 
same station may be worked on 
each band, and contacts be- 
tween 7-land stations are per* 
mitted for multiplier and QSO 
credit, 
EXCHANGE: 

All stations: RSfTycontact no. 
/state, province, or country, 
7-land stations include county. 
SCORING: 

One point per QSO for 7-land 
stations. Five points for each 
7-land contact for all other sta- 
tions. 

Multiplier; 7-land— one multl* 
pller for each of the 50 US states 
and 13 Canadian provinces on 
each band. All others — one for 
each state or province worked 
in the 7-land area, maximum 13 
on each band. 

Power Multiplier: 5 Watts or 
less— xS.00; 5 to 100 Watts in- 
put— x2; 100 to 299 Watts input 
— x1 + 5; 300 to 490 Watts input— 
x1.25; over 500 Watts in put— xl. 

Final score is QSO point total 
x sum of band multipliers x pow- 
er multiplier* 
A WARDS: 

Certificate to each top-scor- 
ing single op in each state, prov- 



ince, and DX country. 

Certificate to each top-scor- 
ing multl-opj single transmitter 
in each W/VE call district. 

There will be no multi-multi 
category. 

All stations operating outside 
the call district indicated by 
their call must sign portable. 
LOGS: 

Logs must show band, mode, 
date and time in GMT, station 
worked, exchange sent and re- 
ceived, points. 

Use a separate sheet for each 
band and include a dupe sheet 
if your entry includes over 100 
contacts. 

Make your own log and dupe 
sheets. However, a summary 
sheet can be obtained from 
WB7NVM if an SASE accompa- 
nies the request. 

Include an SASE with the en- 
try. Mailing deadline is August 
1, 1979, Mail entries to: NAS 
Whidbey Island ARC, c/o Lloyd 
Vancil, 3541 Appian Way, Oak 
Harbor WA 98277. 

220 NOTES— 100 CCXX 
AWARD 

An attractive certificate is 
awarded to amateur radio op- 
erators who contact 100 sepa- 
rate stations anywhere in the 
220-MHz band after receipt of 
the official logsheets. Contacts 
may be made through any re^ 
peater or via simplex. Please 
keep a dupe sheet to avoid dis- 
qualification caused by dupli- 
cate entries, Logs may be ob- 
tained from WB9SNZ; include 
an SASE. Completed logs 
should be mailed with $1.00 to 
220 Notes, to: Greg Pietrucha 
WB9SNZ, 2216 N. Kildare Ave- 
nue, Chicago IL 60639. 

THE WORKED OSWEGO 
COUNTY AWARD 

The Worked Oswego County 
Award (WOSC) is available to 
any amateur radio operator who 
works amateur radio stations in 
at least 13 of Oswego County's 
24 towns and cities. A gold-seal 
endorsement is available to 
those who work all 24 cities and 
towns. 



154 












OMC 



UWJtri (&Mr*j» $ountu 



liStir • *- 




; ■ ■ ■' -.1 




k+mm inn !3*^in *i *•*">» tn Jl 



™ *«rdl. 



All direct two-way contacts 
(made without the aid of a re- 
peater) made after January 1, 
1978, count toward the award, 
All contacts must be made from 
the same station at the same 
fixed location, or t if mobile, 
from within five miles from the 
licensed location. Contacts 
with all fixed or mobile stations 
count on any amateur band. 
Multiple contacts with the same 
station portable or mobile in a 
number of town or city loca- 
tions is permitted for the pur- 
pose of making additional town 
or city contacts. 



A special endorsement is 
available if contacts with all 
cities or towns are made using 
emergency or battery power, 

Applicants should list the 
time, date, frequency, mode, 
and power used, along with sta- 
tion contacted and location 
(town name or city). This is the 
usual information that would be 
filled in on the standard ARRL 
log- The list of 13 or 24 contacts 
should be mailed to the Award 
Custodian along with a self-ad- 
dressed, stamped return enve- 
lope, QSL cards are not re- 
quired, but the spot log check 



requests to the stations fisted 
may be made by the Award Cus- 
todian. 

There is no charge for this 
award. The award is sponsored 
by radio station WOSC to en- 
courage contact with all areas 
of Oswego County and test sta- 
tion capabilities. The rules and 
qualification specifications 
may be changed from time to 
time by the Award Custodian. In 
the case of questions and dis- 
putes, the decision of the 
WOSC Award Custodian is 
final. The Fulton Amateur Radio 



Club will act as custodian for 
the award. Its mailing address 
is: PO Box 246, Fulton NY 13069. 



Official WOSC Li 
Towns 
Oswego Town 
Hannibal 
Gran by 
Minetlo 
Scnba 
Volney 
Schroeppel 
Palermo 
New Haven 
Hastings 
Mexico 
City of Oswego 



st of Oswego County 
and Cities 

Richland 

Sandy Creek 

Boyfston 

Orwell 

Alti ion 

Parish 

West Monroe 

Constantsa 

Am boy 

Wllliamstown 

Redfleld 

City of Fulton 



Looking Wzs\ 



from page 6 

operator assigned the cat f sign 
indicated hereunder, I actively 
operate in the presently-allocat- 
ed 220-MHz amateur band, us- 
ing my own equipment and 
through repeaters representing 
substantial investments of cash 
and technological effort. 

In a portion of Docket 20271 
(Par. 103 and 124) concerning its 
position to WARC on frequency 
allocations, the Commission 
proposed that the present 
220225-MHz amateur radio fre- 
quencies be allocated primarily 
to a new use by the maritime 
radiotelephone service. 

f am not aware of any Notice 
previously issued regarding this 
proposed allocation. This por- 
tion of the Report and Order 
clearly affects my rights and the 
rights of other licensed amateur 
radio operators to the 220-MHz 
band. A formal opportunity for 
amateur radio response would 
demonstrate that the 220-MHz 
band is in active use throughout 
the United States, presenting 
an attractive alternative to the 
crowded 2-meter band, 

Growth of "220" had pre- 
viously been restricted by the 



threatened allocation of the fre- 
quencies to Citizens Band use. 
However, since the Commis- 
sion denied that proposal, ama- 
teur use of the band has flour- 
ished. 

I join with the 220-MHz Spec- 
trum Management Association 
of Southern California in its 
petition to withdraw the affect- 
ed parts of Docket 20271, and to 
set that matter for comments 
and hearings in an appropriate 
framework as required by law, 

Respectfully submitted, 

/sf 

Date: 

Name/Call: 
Address: 
City/State: 

Thanks to 220 Notes, here is 
an easy way for you to join in the 
fight to save 220. Lee Knirko 
W9MOL and Julian Jablin 
W9IWI, who prepared the spe- 
cial "Action" bulletin, suggest 
that you do one of the following 
with the letter: 

1) Make one copy and 14 photo- 
copies, and send all 15 to the 
Secretary of the FCC in Wash- 



ington; or 

2) Send just one copy to the 

FCC (which will at least put you 
on record as opposing the US 
220 WARC proposal, although St 
will not be considered an offi* 
cial reply by the Commission); 
or 

3) Look over the points made 
and draft a letter in your own 
words to the same effect. This 
is the best method, although it 
takes the most time. Then go 
out and again make 14 photo- 
copies and send all 15 to the 
Commission as your official 
reply; or 

4) If you do draft your own letter 
but do not have the time to copy 
it, at least send it to the FCC as 
fast as possible. 

The idea here is for the 
amateur community to show its 
support for the one lone Petition 
for Reconsideration on this 
matter which was filed on time. 
Without such support, the 220- 
SMA has little chance of ac- 
complishing much. With your 
support, the FCC will be forced 
to take notice. 

Lee and Julian also suggest 
that you send copies to your 
s e n ato rs and representatives, 
as well as to Dave Sumner at 
ARRL HQ, I might also suggest 
that copies be sent to the 
220-SMA of Southern California, 
to the Westlink Amateur Radio 
News Service, and to myself. 



THE CB BANDITS 
DEPARTMENT 

Abuses of CB operation were 
given a good look on the morn- 
ing of April 5th on the National 
Broadcasting Company's "To- 
day" program. In a segment en- 
titled "CB Bandits," produced 
at NBC's Burbank facilities by 
Scott Goldstein, NBC corre- 
spondent Jack Perkins ex- 
plained to the public the myriad 
of problems now prevalent on 
the 11 -meter Citizens Band by 
visually documenting many of 
the more common abuses in the 
CB service. 

Shown were such regulatory 

violations as the use of exces- 
sive power, DXing t and even the 
playing of music on 11 meters. 
In the case of the latter, a 
female CB operator in the mid- 
west was shown running an on- 
the-air CB music program from 
taped cartridges through her CB 
set and linear amplifier. Other 
scenes depicted how 1F CB ban- 
dits" who run excessive power 
make life miserable for both the 
legal CB operator (who wishes 
to use 11 meters for its intended 
purpose) and his neighbors, in 
the form of excessive TVI and 
BGL The FCC was given its say 
on this problem through Los 
Angeles Engineer-in-Charge 
Larry Guy, who stated that such 
operations were indeed Illegal 
and noted that if all CB 
operators obeyed the regula- 



155 



tions, there would be no need 
tor amplifiers and the like The 
report showed the FCC's en- 
forcement operation here in 
southern California, but ex- 
plained that although the FCC 
attempted to keep control over 
CB, it was hampered in this due 
to a lack of staff. Lt gave a figure 
of 400 FCC employees nation- 
wide who were trying to police 
more than 15 million CB opera- 
tors. 

Perhaps the most vivid por* 

tton of this 5-minute, 30-second 
segment was mini-cam cover- 
age of a business in Costa 
Mesa, California, known as 
Pacific Coast Communications, 
which the report alleges to be a 
supplier of illegal power ampli- 
fiers and similar equipment. To 
radio amateurs, this particular 
piece has Important signifi- 
cance in that it visually gives 
credence to what many ama- 
teurs have said for a long time 
—that the FCC's linear ampli- 
fier ban on such devices operat- 
ing in the spectrum from 24 
through 36 MHz is nothing but a 
bureaucratic farce which pun- 
ishes the law-abiding amateur 



for the sins of another radio ser- 
vice. The ban has accomplished 
only one thing: It has created a 
rather healthy black market for 
such equipment. I suspect that 
operations such as PCG are 
more the rule than the excep- 
tion. Maybe the contents of the 
"Today" report will get through 
to the Commissioners the fact 
that their "easy way out 1 ' was 
not the right road to foilow after 
all The Inability of the FCC to 
cope with the CB problem won't 
be easily forgotten. 

Whether they realize it or not, 
the "Today" program producers 
have performed a service for 
amateur radio. They did not 
lump amateur and CB opera- 
tions together (as is often done 
by the broadcast media), and 
they graphically pointed out the 
real world of CB and the prob- 
lems it faces today. Moreover, 
they may have given amateurs 
the kind of ammunition needed 
to shoot down the unconstitu- 
tional, unwarranted, and illegal 
ban on 10-meter amplifiers. 

COMMENTARY 

The NBC report neglected to 



RTTY Loop 



from page 20 

tions with special data, these 
characters can be used as soft* 
ware switches to accomplish 
special functions. The special 
codes detailed above, for exam- 



13 It ^N 


■JAB 


v CR-ir } 


c 


HO 






i 


.NO 






'^MATCH'St 


INC. TO 


IAHLL tNiHTj 




NEXT 


ENTRY 



t£5 



SEND P£ma 




*D0 * TO 

OH AH COUHT 



CEO 

Fig, 5, SPLCHR routine. 



pie, translate to: 
S0O — The null is stored for 

control codes which have no 
function in Baudot, e,g. h $01, 
$02, $1F, but not those with a 
function, as the BELL ($07). 

$FF— A DEL is stored for cer- 
tain "special" printable char 
acters not found on the Baudot 
keyboard. 

$FE— Stored at the first loca- 
tion of the table, $FE will be 
sent as LTRS when a NULL is in- 
put from the keyboard. 

After the table value is re- 
trieved, it is tested for $FF, and, 
if present, a branch to SPLCHR 
is executed. This routine han- 
dles those printable characters, 
like \ %, and @, that are not 
represented in Baudot, Another 
test for $00 directs a branch 
back to the input if present. 
Thus r control codes do not even 
start the outputting routine, 

if there is no "special case," 
then the Baudot output se- 
quence is initiated. The MSB of 
the data re triev ed from the table 
encodes LETTERS or FIGURES 
case. The routine diagrammed 
in Fig. 3 shows how the shift is 
read, compared with the current 
case, stored, and changed if 
necessary. It should be noted 
that SPACE, CARRIAGE RE- 
TURN, and LINE FEED are all 
sent as lowercase (LTRS) char- 
acters. Thus, downshift when 
spacing or when sending a new 
line is ensured. 

Having established the shift, 



mention one important ttem— 
that the problems depicted 
were big-city ones not often 
found in the outlying areas. Los 
Angeles CB operation is a 
mess. It's virtually impossible 
to hold a QSO of any conse* 
quence because of the many CB 
bandits like those depicted on 
"Today." This holds true for 
most cities of any size. How- 
ever, once you get away from 
the big cities, things are quite 
different; the CB bandit is 
definitely a minority figure in 
such locations. 

One other point missed by 
the NBC presentation was the 
difference between AM and 
SSB operation. Only unstruc- 
tured AM was shown, which in 
big-city CB is a no-man's-land. 
Not mentioned were some of 
the structured and voluntarily- 
poiiced SSB operations. How- 
ever, it is hard to really criticize 
this report on either of these 
points, since the obvious aim 
was to enlighten the public 
about the current problems of 
11-meter CB, Considering the 
constraints imposed by the ex- 
act timing that TV broadcasting 



requires, I must say that NBC 
has done a rather outstanding 

job, 

* • # 

In a late-breaking develop- 
ment, the FCC acted the week 
of April 1st to deny the 220-SMA 
Petition for Reconsideration of 
Docket 20271. The FCC based 
tts denial of this and eight 
similar petitions on the grounds 
that over four years had been 
spent on the preparation of the 
WARC proposal and that, dur- 
ing that time, all interested 
parties had been given ample 
time to comment. However, it 
must be noted that during this 
four-year period, not once was 
there a mention of reallocating 
216 through 225 MHz to the 
maritime service and, therefore, 
there was no way In which con- 
cerned amateurs could conv 
ment on the matter. Many 220- 
MHz amateurs feel that both the 
maritime service and the FCC 
have directly violated the 
federal government's Adminis- 
trative Procedures Act and 
stand ready to take whatever 
legal action is necessary to pre- 
vent the implementation of the 
WARC proposal. 



the actual character is output, 
using the routine shown in Fig. 
4. This routine loads the carry 
bit with the five remaining data 
bits in the accumulator, keeping 
track of the bit number with a 
counter. If the carry bit is a fc T\ 
a MARK is sent; a "O" sends a 
SPACE. START (22 ms SPACE) 
and STOP (31 ms MARK) bits 
are also appended, thus creat- 
ing true TTY format. 

Should you have encountered 
one of those "special" charac- 
ters we mentioned above, a 
branch to SPLCHR would have 
brought you to a routine dia- 
grammed in Fig. 5. Here, the 
original ASCII character input is 
retrieved from the table pointer 
where it was stored. If it is a car- 
riage return, a branch to a rou- 
tine called CRLFOT will send 
the string CR-CR-LF-LTRS- 
LTRS, a "standard" way of ini* 
tiatlng a new line in Baudot, and 
echo a CR-LF on the terminal. 
Otherwise, a period (.) followed 
by two letters and another 
period fill in for the missing 
character. Fig. 6 shows the 
codes used for the ASCII char- 
acters encoded. 

The flowcharts shown this 
month comprise an overview of 
a practical means of Baudot 
transmission with a computer. 



ASCII 


Symbol 


Baudot 


$23 


* 


.NR, 


$25 


% 


PC, 


S2A 


• 


.AS. 


$2B 


4- 


.PL. 


S3C 


< 


XT. 


*3D 


s 


m 


S3E 


> 


GT. 


$40 


it 


Jil. 


$58 


I 


■((- 


$5C 


\ 


,BS, 


S5D 


] 


» 


$5E 


t 


♦UP. 


$5F 


— 


■UL 



Fig. 6. SPLCHR conversions. 

Next month, 1 wiil go into a pro- 
gram to implement this scheme 
on an SWTPC 6800 computer. 
Input shall be through the con- 
trol interface. An MP-5 AC1A- 
type input is preferred, although 
the MP-C PIA-type board wiil 
suffice. Output shall be through 
one bit of a PI A board (MP-L) on 
port #7. 

Regards this month to 
Meivon G. Hart W0RV in St. 
Louis MO. Meivon is using Tele- 
typeTM gear now, but we hope 
with the program now devel- 
oping, and others, he will soon 
be able to get that SWTPC sys- 
tem on RTTY! He also lets us 
know that an active two meter 
RTTY net is on in St. Louis, on 
146.70 MHz, AFSK, Thanks for 
the info, Mel. 



Ham Help 



I have a niece in Corpus 
Christ! TX who is interested in 
becoming a ham. She is 3 years 
old but sharper than I in some 
ways. Is there a group in Corpus 



Chrlsti who could help out with 
this project? Thanks. 

Jim Falkner 

Box S50 

Port Saint Joe FL 32456 



156 



OSCAR Orbits 



Courtesy of AMSAT 



The listed data tells you the time and place that OSCAR 7 and 
OSCAR 8 cross the equator in an ascending orbit for the first time 
each day. To calculate successive OSCAR 7 orbits, make a list of 
the first orbit number and the next twelve orbits for that day. List 
the time of the first orbit. Each successive orbit is 115 minutes 
later (two hours Jess five minutes). The chart gives the longitude of 
the day's first ascending (northbound) equatorial crossing. Add 
29* for each succeeding orbit, When OSCAR is a ending on the 
other side of the world from you, it will descend o mt you. To find 
the equatorial descending longitude, subtract 166° from the 
ascending longitude. To find the time OSCAR 7 passes the North 
Pole, add 29 minutes to the time it passes the equator. You should 
be able to hear OSCAR 7 when it is within 45 degrees of you. The 
easiest way to determine if OSCAR is above the horizon (and thus 
within range) at your location Is to take a globe and draw a circle 
with a radius of 2450 mites (4000 kilometers) from your QTH. If 
OSCAR passes above that circle, you should be able to hear it. If it 
passes right overhead, you should hear it for about 24 minutes 
total, OSCAR 7 will pass an imaginary line drawn from San Fran- 
cisco to Norfolk about 12 minutes after passing the equator. Add 
about a minute for each 200 miles that you live north of this line. If 
OSCAR passes 15* east or west of you. add another minute; at 30 *, 
three minutes; at 45 % ten minutes. Mode A: 145.85- .95 MHz uplink, 
29.4-29.5 MHz downlink, beacon at 29,502 MH2. Mode B: 
432J25-.175 MHz uplink. 145-975-.925 MHz downlink, beacon at 
145.972 MHz. 

OSCAR 8 calculations are similar to those for OSCAR 7, with 
some important exceptions. Instead of making 13 orbits each day, 
OSCAR 8 makes 14 orbits during each 24-hour period. The orbital 
period of OSCAR 8 is therefore somewhat shorter: 103 minutes. 



To calculate successive OSCAR 8 orbits, make a list of the first 
orbit number (from the OSCAR 8 chart) and the next thirteen orbits 
for that day. List the time of the first orbit. Each successive orbit is 
then 103 minutes later. The chart gives the longitude of the day's 
first ascending equatorial crossing. Add 26° for each succeeding 
orbit. To find the time OSCAR 8 passes the North Pole, add 26 
minutes to the time it crosses the equator. OSCAR 8 will cross the 
imaginary San Francisco-to-Norfolk line about 11 minutes after 
crossing the eauator. Mode A; 145.85-.95 MHz uplink, 29.4-29.50 
MHz downlink, beacon at 29.40 MHz. Mode J: 145.90-146.00 MHz 
uptink t 435.20-435.10 MHz downlink, beacon on 435.090 MHz. 



OSCAR $ Orbital Information 


OSCAR 7 Orbital Information 


Ortill 


Data 


Tima 


Longitude 


Orbil 


Data 


Time 


Longitude 




Uun#> 


of Eq, 




{June 


) (GMTJ 


ol Eq 








Crossing *W 








Crossing ' V 


Q31QA1M 


1 


0136:46 


66 6 


20775 


1 


0002^4 


64.0 


6324 J bn 


2 


0141:57 


609 


2D7SS 


2 


0056:41 


77.6 


6337 J twi 


3 


000354 


45 4 


20801 


3 


0150 58 


91 1 


6351 Abn 


4 


000905 


467 


2081 3qrp 


4 


0050:18 


76.0 


B30SAtm 


5 


0014 15 


4&1 


20626 


5 


0144:35 


89.6 


6379X 


e 


0013:26 


494 


2G83SX 


6 


004355 


74,4 


6393Ab*i 


7 


0024.37 


50 7 


20851 


7 


013812 


880 


6407Abn 


e 


0029:47 


520 


20663 


e 


0037:32 


72.9 


642ubfi 


i 


0034 58 


53.3 


2U8/6 


9 


0131:49 


86.5 


6436Jbn 


10 


004039 


54.6 


20688 


to 


0031:10 


F1 3 


6449Abn 


ii 


0045:19 


55.9 


20901 qrp 


it 


0125:27 


84.9 


64B3AIM 


12 


0060:30 


57 2 


20913 


12 


0024:47 


69-6 


6477X 


13 


0055:40 


sas 


20926X 


13 


0119-04 


83 3 


6491 Abfi 


M 


0100-51 


6BJI 


20938 


14 


0018^4 


68^ 


fcSOSAbn 


15 


010602 


61 _2 


20951 


T5 


0112:41 


81.8 


OSIftJbn 


16 


0111.12 


62 5 


20963 


16 


O&1£01 


666 


6533Jbn 


17 


0116:23 


636 


20976 


t7 


0106:18 


80 2 


654 Mbn 


18 


0121:33 


65.1 


20986qrp 


18 


0005:39 


65 1 


6561 Atm 


19 


0126:44 


664 


21001 


19 


005955 


787 


8675X 


20 


0131:54 


67 7 


21014JC 


20 


0154:12 


923 


aeaoAtm 


21 


0137:05 


69.0 


21026 


21 


0053 33 


771 


eeoaA&n 


22 


0142: 15 


70.3 


21039 


22 


014750 


907 


6616Jbn 


23 


0004 12 


45.8 


21051 


:: 


0047 10 


756 


eoacufc) 


24 


0009:23 


47,1 


2l064fd 


24 


0141:27 


89 1 


6644Abn 


25 


0014:33 


464 


21076qrp 


25 


004047 


740 


e6S8Abn 


26 


0019:43 


49.6 


21069 


26 


0135:04 


97 6 


6672X 


27 


0024:54 


51 1 


21101X 


27 


0034:24 


7^4 


GGaBAtm 


28 


0030 04 


52.« 


21114 


26 


0128:41 


86.0 


670OAbn 


29 


0035 15 


53,7 


21126 


29 


002802 


709 


6714Jbo 


30 


0040:25 


5S0 


21139 


30 


0122:19 


845 



Corrections 



This is to express thanks to 
all CW music fans for correc- 
tions and suggestions for im- 
provements for the keyboard 
described in the February issue 
of 73 ("This Station Plays 
Beautiful CW"). 

A note from KA1ADF 
(Speedy) arrived one day before 
I received my copy of 73 and 
pointed out: (1) The 10k re- 
sistors of Fig. 1 are not shorted 
out as the print indicates; (2) 
The callout for Fig. 2 should 
show 4071 for U7; and (3) U10 is 
a 4049. WA0KZL points out thai 
the diodes are 1 N4148, not as in- 
dicated in the callout for Fig. 1« 
Actually, about any diode will 
work. Even the cheap IN 4001 
will do fine. Along with thanks 
to Tex goes my apology to 
Susan Phiibrick of the 73 staff. 
She questioned this and I gave 
her a wrong answer 

W1ZB reports that he has 
built 20 keyboards over the 
years and is now going back to 
the diode matrix after trying 
many other methods. Hrs next 
keyboard will use CW music 
logic but will replace the 40105 
FIFO with the Fairchild 3341 to 
give a 64-letter buffer. For those 
who want a larger buffer, this is 
a good way to go. 

DA1WD wants a memory for 
canned messages, An RCA 
CPD1823SD RAM interfaced be- 
tween the 40105 FIFOs and the 
shift register ought to work. I 



have not made one tike this, but 
it looks good on paper and wilt 
give 128 letters. If 256 letters are 
desired, a pair of C01822SDs 
would do the job. 

WB5RVH is on the air with an 
anaplastic case, using a con- 
verted UNIVAC surplus terminal 
and a rechargeable nicad power 
pack. He reports RFI problems 
when using the charger plugged 
into the ac supply. No problem 
without the charger. Suggest 
adding 0.01 uF bypass capac- 
itors on all in/out lines. Elec- 
trolytics do a good job of filter- 
ing but are poor for rf bypass. 

The worst problem of all is 
availability of the 40105 FIFO. 
This chip is made by RCA and 
Motorola and is available from 
the big houses such as Cramer, 
Hamilton, and Semiconductor 
Specialists. Unfortunately, all 
of these distributors have a 
hard-nosed S25 minimum order 
policy. On top of that, they often 
do not stock all other required 
chips. I was about to believe 
that it would be necessary to go 
to Japan for service when I 
decided to check the 73 adver- 
tisers—see Daytapro on page 
183 of the February issue. Send 
Neil K9WRL an SASE for a 
quote on a chip package. He 
promises he will supply the 
40105. By the way, if your hobby 
time is hard to come by, use the 
top line of chips. Specify RCA 
buffered "B" line, or equal. A 



typical number is CD 4071 BE. 
After you have one keyboard 
working, you can test "bargain" 
chips easily. 

Several others have written 
for diagrams on keying circuits 
and sidetone oscillators. Sorry, 
but I did not make drawings, I 
just hooked up the components 
per typical sketches, such as 
shown by VE3CW4 on page 107 
in the February issue. 

As hams notify me that they 
are on the air, I will send them a 
"CW Music" number. Who is go- 
ing to be #3? Let's hear more 
CW music. Even if you don't 
care for a keyboard, good code 
makes operation a pleasure and 



can be sent by all methods of 

keying. 

Russell C. W. Crom WB9WRE 

904 Barberry Street 

Mt. Prospect I L 60056 

We would like to point out 
that one of our articles ("Univer* 
sal Alarm Circuit, 11 March, 1979) 
is very similar to one which ap- 
peared in the December 11, 
1975, issue of Electronics 
("Multiplexed detectors Isolate 
water leaks"). F. E. H inkle, Jr. 
K5PA (Austin TX) holds US pa- 
tent number 4,090,193 on this 
device. 

John C. Burnett 
Managing Editor 



Ham Help 



i nee 1 a schematic diagram 
for an Electronic Counters, Inc. 
(ECI), Pulse Generator, Model 
5101. If someone has a copy to 
share, I will pay for reproduction 
and mailing. Thank you. 

Russell Steele 

638 Gayle Street 

Papillion NE 68046 

I need a manual for a Conar 
Model 80 solid-state television 
kit. I also need any kind of infor- 
mation on a 1928 Model 3 
Eveready ac receiver and a 
possible matching transmitter. 
Any help with these items will 
be deeply appreciated. Thanks. 

Peter H. Oeslerie VE3HOH/W3 

RD#1 

Orwigsburg PA 17961 



I am attempting to make a list 
of optometrists who are ama- 
teur radio operators, Presently, I 
know of about 15, and I am sure 
there are more out there. Per- 
haps an informal net could be 
started. All GSLs will be ap- 
preciated. Thank you. 

Dr. Thomas W. Byers WB9YTG 

7221 W. Lake St 
River Forest IL 60305 

I would appreciate any in for 
matlon on a 4-inch Western 
Electric 0-1-0 milliammeter. It 
has 6 terminals on the back, 
labeled AC1 , AC2, DC + , DC - , 
DC ± , and R. 

Neil Johnson W20LU 

30 Harwich Road 

South Orleans MA 02662 



157 



• i iTOO: - : \ii.(\ ' X 
I CIS V 

1 i v . ■: • ^^ Th a 



». ■'. ■« r brojfr 




te] 3 



a Bp 1 2 



from page tS 

several additional pieces of 
gear to the station. Not only are 
the products at the top of the 
tine in features, design, and 
reliability, but also I have called 
them on two occasions for ad- 
vice In application of some of 
the equipment and have univer- 
sally been treated respectfully 
and promptly. On each occa- 
sion, I was referred to the 
amateur radio department and 



you prj'frl ^v 
that she s! 

have found the information 
readily available, helpfully given 
and interpreted, and additional 
recommendations made. 

The attitude and cooperation 
are truly exemplary. The speed 
and completeness of the ser- 
vice department is outstanding, 
and the basic design and pre^ 
sentation of the products are 
unbelievable. I would not 
hesitate to recommend this 
company and their personnel to 
anyone wishing a complete 



package of up-to-date equip- 
ment backed by all the tech- 
nical and service expertise that 
could ever be needed, and all 
presented in a speedy, courte* 
ous, and comprehensive way. 

Dr. E. Daniel Kay, Jr. K4HTY 

Portsmouth VA 



TURKEYS 



] 



Never in my wildest dreams 
would I have ever thought I'd be 
subscribing to 73 Magazine. Un- 
til now, I have considered it just 
a cut above Popular Electronics 
as far as contents. Things like 
how to build a moisture detec- 
tor or fuse testing made simple 
simply did not appeal. 

Your February issue, how- 
ever, has caused me to rethink 
my position. The article on the 
8080 control system makes me 



feet that you may be getting 
around to some serious ama- 
teur projects. I did read the arti- 
cle, "The 2 Meter ECM Caper," 
and L am appalled at the fact 
that you could publish some- 
thing tantamount to sanction- 
ing the jamming of another 
amateur station. Granted, the 
amateur in question may have 
used improper or illegal 
methods to obtain a license, but 
at that time, he was still a 
licensed amateur. 

I realize that you have to sell 
magazines in order to provide 
livings for you and your staff, 
but i personally feel that articles 
providing the "turkeys" with 
new ideas are not in the best in- 
terest of anyone associated 
with amateur radio, Lord knows, 
we have enough problems 
without causing new ones. 

R. G, Wilde K6EGM 
Van Nuys CA 



DX 



from page 22 

OK3TAB/D2A is in Angola 
and will be there for one year 
He has a beam up and is a very 
good operator in handling the 
pileups QSL to OK3ALE. 

The Northern California DX 
Foundation shipped a new 
linear amplifier to Easter Island 
to help boost the signal of 
Father Pave CE0AE. You should 
be hearing the results by now. 

Beginning in July,EL$tations 
in Liberia will be signing 5L for 
the remainder of the year. 

KH3AA is a civilian on 
Johnston Island and is 
available for skeds. Write to 
John at Box 69 t APO San Fran- 
cisco 96305. 

In case you have been look- 
ing for San Marino, there are 
eight licensed true-blue sta- 



tions. These are M1B, M1BS t 
M1C. M1D, M1H, M1I, MIY.and 
M1W + Good luck. 

Liechtenstein and San 
Marino are often believed to be 
the smallest sovereign states in 
the world, but a mansion on the 
Via Condotti in Rome is prob- 
ably the smallest of them all. 
This is the independent territory 
of the Sovereign Military Order 
of Malta. It representsan order 
founded during the Crusades 
and the order held the island of 
Rhodes for over 200 years. The 
order still issues its own pass- 
ports and maintains its own 
diplomatic corps. 

For some reason, the ARRL 
has refused to recognize the 
Sovereign Military Order of 
Malta as a separate country, but 
remember, it took the League 30 
years to admit that there were 




Here is the entire group that hoped to put VU4ARC on from the 
Laccadives last March. The OXpedifion was well planned down to 
the fast detail f even including medical personnel among the group t 
but was halted at the last minute due to tight security surrounding 
a visit to the Laccadives by the Prime Minister 



two Germanys, 

A new amateur in the Amer- 
ican Embassy in Bangui has 
reportedly been issued the call 
TL8JAM. At this writing, he had 
no gear on hand but was 
awaiting shipment of some 
from the States. You should be 
hearing him anytime now. 

Brother Ed HV3SJ has been 
sent to Colombia, thereby shut- 
ting down any regular activity 
from the Vatican. 

QSLing for rare DX stations 
can sometimes be a bigger 
chore than ever imagined. Over 
3.000 QSLs from 4U1UN went 
out to deserving DXers during 
February alone. W2MZV is now 
handling 4U1UN QSLs, so you 
can QSL direct to Herman if you 
desire. If you haven't snagged 
this one yet, look for them from 
Wednesdays 19Q0Z to 0100Z 
Thursdays in the 21355 kHz and 
14240 kHz areas, plus or minus. 

Pradhan A51PN reports that 
he is now handling his own 
QSLing, Look for him on 14005 
kHz between 1200Z and 1230Z 
and on 14225 kHz between 
1230Z and 1300Z. QSL turn- 
around is generally four to six 
weeks, Pradhan's activity has 
increased noticeably since the 
Southeastern DX Club shipped 
him an outboard vfo. 

W1GNC reports sending back 
all the WODX/Desecheo QSL re- 
quests because he never re- 
ceived any logs. This should not 
cause any problems since 
KP4AM/D is the only one being 
accepted for DXCC credit. 

A station has been showing 
on twenty meters signing 3X1 IX 
and saying to QSL to Box 477 
there in Conakry. Some have 
wondered if this might be Slim. 
Back in 1963 there was a station 
signing 7X11X, also saying to 
QSL to Box 477 in Conakry and 
also giving his name as Vlad. 

This station was legitimate and 
was operated by OK3UI, so 



there appears a very good 
possibility that 3X1 IX is for real. 

The Arabic Net meets each 
Saturday at l900Zon 14250 kHz. 
Stations checking into this net 
include A7, A9. ST2, ST0, YK, VI. 
J Y t and SU among others. If you 
need any of these for a new one, 
it might pay to take a listen. 

LX1AG has been showing 
regularly twice a week on 14240 
kHz at 2330Z. He says he plans 
to follow this pattern for some 
time and hopes to give a new 
country contact and QSL to 
everyone needing LX, 

The ARRL has withdrawn all 
Sable Island credit for the 
operation last fall of VE1MTA, 
saying the station was not 
authorized, 

K8NW wants us to let every- 
one know that he is not, repeat 
not, QSL manager for VR0M and 
should not be sent any more 
cards. 

Due to a recent callsign shuf- 
fle, stations on Crete can be 
identified by their new SV9 
prefix. 

There has been a chain letter 
going around aimed at ama- 
teurs. All you have to do to 
claim untold riches, claims the 
letter, is mail one dollar to the 
proper address, then prepare 
twenty copies of the letter in- 
serting your name in the proper 
spot, and mail them out to twen- 
ty ham friends. This chain letter 
is illegal because it asks for 
money. I wonder how it would 
work if, instead of money, the 
letter asked for blank OX QSL 
cards. Just think, you send one 
QSL to the name at the bottom 
of the list and a few weeks later 
you receive 8,000 OX QSLs 
ready for you to fill in your 
callsign. Instant Honor Roll. Ac* 
tually, that kind of thing has 
been going on in CB circles for 
years. 

DJ9ZB has out the latest edi- 
tion of his up-to-the-minute QSL 



158 



Manager's Directory. This 6" x 
8" softcover book runs to about 
80 pages and is available direct 
from DJ92B for $5.00. 

WB90QU takes a list for 
those needing 4S7EA each 
Wednesday evening about 

231QZ. 4S7EA shows up at 
2330Z and usually stays around 
for about an hour. QSL to 
WB90QU. 

Herb Schoenbohm KV4F2/ 
NOVA has not backed off on his 
attempt to have Water Island 
declared a separate DXCC 
country- He prepared eight 
pages of strong support and 
fired it off to the DXCC desk 
there in Newington. Water 
Island remains a live issue with 
Herb, 

FR7BP has requested that no 
IRCs, stamps, or dollars be sent 
for return postage since his 
mail Is usually opened before 
he receives it and such items 
removed. Just send your card 
and he will reply via the bureau, 
It is usually best not to develop 
a habit of putting call letters on 
the outside of envelopes des^ 
fined for overseas addresses. In 
some areas, this just brings un- 
wanted attention. 

D4CBS reports that plans for 
any S9 operation have been 
shelved for the immediate 
future. Angelo says that the 
possibility still exists but that 
the probability is just about 
zero. 

Speaking of D4CBS, he rs one 
of the first, along with AA6AA 
and W1NG t to reach the first 
plateau of 100 zones in the 
chase to earn 5BWAZ award #1. 

A new DX club is being 
formed in the Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana, area. Drop a note to 
Jack Whitaker, 2327 Daggett 
Avenue, for more details. 

That recent K1CO/PJ7 opera- 
tion ran up 14,074 contacts in 
scoring some 12.3 million 
points. Not satisfied, they will 
add three more operators and 
try again In the CO WW contest 
this fall This will be a multi- 
mult i operation from PJ7 and a 
multi-single operation from 
FS7. QSL K1CO/PJ7 to K3RLY. 

OE6EEG along with DJ9ZB, 
F6BDS, and J28AZ are planning 
a possible upcoming effort from 
the Red Sea area including Abu 
Ail. They are exploring the 
possibilities of several areas 
and you should be hearing more 
on this soon. 

North and South Yemen, 4W 
and 70, long-time enemies, 
have decided it might be best 
for all concerned if they com- 
bined the two countries under 
one government, This would, of 
course, mean the deletion from 
the DXCC list of 4W and 70 and 
the addition of the emerging 
single nation, Being the oppor* 
tunlsts they are, several DXers 
are already planning for the 
great event, 

EP2LI reports that his next 
duty station will be in Qatar, A7, 



and that he plans to make every 
effort to reduce this one's 
standing on the needed lists. 
Mike had to abandon everything 
in Iran including rig, household 
goods, clothing, and the family 
bus. QSL to WA4PYF, who also 
has logs for A7XAH. 

The Swiss Amateur Radio 
Magazine, O/d Man, reported 
that HB9APN is at the Swiss 
Embassy in Peking and has 
been on SSB on 21 1 55 kHz sign- 
ing HB9APN/BY. 

There is a feeling, going into 
WARC 79 T by the FCC in Wastv 
ington that the amateurs are lax 
in reporting unauthorized inter- 
ference in the amateur bands. 
Citing the well-known Russian 
"woodpecker" as an example, 
they note that complaints to the 
FCC on this violation of ITU fre- 
quency allocations have dwin- 
dled to a trickle and it may be 
quite possible to have an asser- 
tion made at WARC 79 that the 
interference is nil because the 
amateurs themselves have 
stopped complaining. If you are 
one who has not complained 
because you felt the ARRL was 
there to protect us all and was 
taking care of things, then 
maybe you should write the 
League and inquire why this in- 
trusion into the amateur bands 
is still going strong after more 
than two years. The "wood- 
pecker" is not the only violator. 
The Afrikaner Net has at times 
been forced to shift frequency 
because of commercial interfer- 
ence. There are times when you 
must take matters into your own 
hands and quit waiting for the 
other fellow. The following is a 
full list of FCC monitoring sta* 
tions and their telephone num- 
bers. The next time you hear an 
intruder on the amateur bands, 
pick up your telephone and 
report it to the nearest monitor- 
ing station. Not just once, but 
every time, 

Allegan, Michigan (6i6)-673-2Q&3 

Anchorage, Alaska (907)-344-101 1 
Belfast, Maine (207) 338-4088 

Douglas, Arizona (602)^364-2133 

Femdale, Washington (206)-354-4892 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida (30&H 72-551 1 
Grand Island, Nebraska (308)382-4296 
Kingsville, Texas (512)592-2531 

Laurel, Maryland (301 j-725-3474 

Lfvermore, California (415)447-3614 
Powder Springs, Georgia 

(404)943-4794 
Sabana Seca T Puerto Rico 

(809)^784-3772 
Washington, DC (202)632 6975 

Waipahu, Hawaii (808)-6 77-3954 

Just because your neighbor 
called doesn't mean you need 
not call. The more reports the 
better. 

ZS6BEE will shortly be 
heading out to Marion Island, 
ZS2MI, to relieve the present 
operator there, Plans call for 
some much needed activity 
after his arrival. 

The FCC has extended the 
grace period for renewal of 



amateur radio licenses to five 
years. This means that you may 
regain your operator's privi- 
leges up to five years after let- 
ting your license expire without 
having to retake the exam. See 
the May QSTfor details. 

A6XP T the last active station 
in the UAE, went QRT on Febru- 
ary 11th and this appeared to 
have ended any amateur activi- 
ty for the present time. The gear 
was confiscated and it seems 
the present authorities have no 
use for amateur radio in their 
country, K1DRN has been han- 
dling the QSL chores for A6XB 
since 1971 and has all the logs 
up to 0300Z on February 8th. 

This may be a little after the 
fact, but a group of UA-types 
received permission to put 
Franz Joseph Land on the air 
using the call R1FJ, The opera- 
tion was originally to start in 
mid-April, but this has been 
pushed back somewhat. Any- 
way, \f you heard or worked 
R1FJ f you know it was FJL. If it 
hasn't been heard yet, then it 
should be at anytime. 

Amateur license totals at the 
end of January stood at 357,900 
with 63,000 Novices, 68,000 
Technicians, 119,000 Generals, 
83,000 Advanceds, and 22,000 
Extras- Amateur growth rate 
during 1978 was 8.4%. 

RM-3317 requests that a hob- 
by license be established adja- 
cent to the 29-MHz band. The 
ARRL plans to file an opposi- 
tion. 

Recent check-ins to the 
14225-kHz net include FB8XV, 
STORK, CR9AJ, BV2B, and 
KA1NC. If any of these excite 
your blood, try 14225 kHz from 
1500Z daily. The Afrikaner Net 
has been drawing not only from 
Africa, but South America, 
Europe, Asia, and the Pacific 
areas as well. This one meets at 
21355 kHz from 1830Z. 

The Comoro authorities have 
done a sudden about-face and 
shut down all amateur activity. 
Robin D68AD has dismantled 
his station, taken down his 
antenna, and is awaiting reas- 
signment. It appears that Co- 
moro will be joining the United 
Arab Republic in a steady 
march to the uppermost regions 
of the most-needed list. 

K3ZJ wrote in to point out an 
error in the April QSL listing. 
HSIABD's QSL manager is 
K3EST, not W1YRC as listed. 
We knew that all along, guys. 
We just wanted to see if you 
were paying attention, 

Carl and Martha Henson, 
WB4ZNH and WN4FVU, report- 
ed great conditions in making 
some 5,200 QSOs from the 
Maldive Islands, mostly on 
twenty with some on fifteen, but 
precious few on 10/40 meters. 
They give much of the credit to 
4S7EA and his friends at Ceylon 
Tours as well as to 4S7JD and 
his wife for their generous 
hospitality and the fact that 



they were there if anything was 
needed. QSL to Carl Henson, 
8280 Chestnut Dr., Jonesboro 
GA 30236. Carl notes that cards 
for AQ7 and HQ7 will be an- 
swered okay, but cards with in- 
correct date and/or time will re- 
ceive biting criticism in addition 
to QSL, (Apparently, some sta- 
tions mistook 8Q7 for AQ7 or 
HQ7.) 

That's about all for this 
month. I hope some of the 
preceding information helps 
you work a few new ones. If any 
of you take a DXpedition-type 
vacation this summer, shoot a 
few extra pictures of your exotic 
surroundings and send them 
along, either black-and-white or 
color. 

Thanks for much of the pre- 
ceding information to the West 
Coast DX Bulletin, the Long 
Island DX Association Newslet- 
ter, and WoridRadio News. 

NOVICE CORNER 

We have been asked to re- 
mind everyone to please not 
send cards destined to state- 
side QSL managers via the 
ARRL Outgoing QSL Bureau. 
These cards wind up in that 
manager's envelope at the 
bureau and then he must pay 
postage on it to get his own 
cards from the bureau, If a QSL 
isn't worth the 30$ two-way 
postage to the one requesting 
it, it sure isn't worth anything to 
the manager. Remember to 
always use GMT, also called 
UCT or Zulu time, on QSLs sent 
to managers and always in- 
clude a seif-addressed stamped 
envelope (SASE) or a self-ad- 
dressed envelope and IRCs 
(SAE) for the manager to use in 
sending the DX station's QSL 
back. 

AMATEUR RADIO IN JAPAN 

The following information 
comes from an interview be- 
tween Jan Shiliington N9YL and 
Jun Okamura JA2BJW which 
appeared in the Wheaton Com- 
munity Radio Amateurs, Inc., 
bulletin which is edited by 
N9YL. It should greatly increase 
your knowledge of conditions in 
Japan. 

Q. How many hams are there 
in Japan? 

A. There are 355,757 stations 
(CB— 367,633) as of December, 
1977. 

Q. How many classes are 
there in Japan? 

A. Four classes — First Class, 
Second Class, Novice-CW, and 
Novice-Phone. 

Q. How many DX countries 
has Japan? 

A. Four countries — JA, JD1 
(Ogasawara Island), JD1 
(MinarnhTorishima island), and 
JDl (Okino Torishima), 

Q, What is the Japanese zone 
number? 

A. 25 (WW contest, eta) and 
45 (ITU). 

Q, How many kinds of month- 



im 




From left to right: Ernest 4S7EA, Cart WB4ZNH/8Q7AF. Martha 
WN4FVU/8Q7AG, and Jay 4S7JD during Carl and Martha 's recent 
successful operation from the Maidive Islands in the Indian 
Ocean. 



ly ham magazines are published 
In Japan? 

A. Three kinds — JARL News, 
CQ Ham Radio, and Mobile 
Ham. 

Q. Can you tell me the 
Japanese prefixes in licensed 
order? 

A. JA r JH, JR t JE, JF, JG r Jl r 
JJ, JK, and JL (except JD t 8J7). 



Q. What is the call area of the 
largest number of hams In 
Japan? 

4. JA7 has about 41% of all. 

Q. What is the call area of the 
smallest number of hams in 
Japan? 

A> JAB has about 4% of all. 

Q* How much is a Drake TR-7 
in Japan? 



A. $1,338 ($1 equals ¥ 195). 
Prices for other rigs: Mosley TA* 
33— $307; Yaesu FT~101—$9Q3; 
Coiiins KWM-2A—S4686; Hy- 
Gain TH6DXX—S508; Trio TS- 
820S—$118Q. 

Q. Can an American operate 
in Japan? 

A. Yes t he can t but as a mem- 
ber of a club station only. 

G. Can you tell me the struc- 
ture of a call sign for a Japanese 
club station? 

A. Three-fetter suffix, of 
which the first letter is Y or Z, 
such as JAJYAA, JH2ZAB. 

Q, Is KA in Japan a ham sta- 
tion? 

A. No, The Japanese govern- 
ment does not recognize KA as 
a ham. J A is forbidden to QSO 
with KA. 

Q. What are the most wanted 
three states of USA from JA? 

A Delaware, Wyoming, and 
North Dakota. 

Q. In which direction does 
W*s sig come up to JA on short 
path? 

A. Around 40° NE. 

If you are planning a trip to 
Japan and would like to operate 
under their "club 1 ' system, con- 
tact the TIARA (club?) at: 
TIARA, Tomigaya Grand*3Q1 t 
19-5Tomigaya 2-chome, Sibuya T 
Tokyo 151 1 Japan, or telephone 
in Tokyo 485-1971.— N9YL 



OSCAR DXPEDITION 
ANNOUNCEMENT 

WB6GFJ will return to Tahiti 
later this summer to operate on 
OSCAR. The Post and Telecom- 
munications Office m Papeete 
has just notified Ross that his 
callsign has been authorized 
and is awaiting his arrival in 
Tahiti. His callsign will be 
FOGFB. QSL via WB6GFJ or the 
AMSAT-OSCAR QSL Bureau. 
This year, Ross will have 
Modes A, B, and J (CW and 
SSB), but will concentrate on 
Mode A QSOs from Tahiti. 
Plans are to operate on all 
currently-operating satellites 
with Mode A capabilities. As 
plans firm up t we will publish 
exact dates, times, frequen- 
cies, and exact orbits to look 
for Ross on the air on OSCAR. 

Part of his time will be spent 
helping F08 stations get start- 
ed and operating on OSCAR. 
Anyone with unused 2 meter 
converters or small CW trans- 
mitters that could be left with 
F08 stations for them to use on 
OSCAR would be appreciated. 
Also, anybody that can trans* 
late OSCAR information from 
English into French would be 
most appreciated — contact 
Ross as soon as possible. 

Presently, the plans are to be 
in Tahiti sometime in August or 
September of this year. 



W2HSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

editorial by Wayne Green 



Irum page 4 

committees suppose. When 
someone like me can double the 



attendance, that's important to 
know. 

All during the St. Louis ham- 
fest, people introduced them* 




Hams drove in from over 200 miles around to enjoy this day in St, 
Louis— ARCH MARCH— ARCH for the famous St Louts arch and 
MARCH for Midwest Amateur Radio Computer Hobbyists. This is 
the 73 Magazine booth {also Kilobaud MICROCOMPUTING; and 
Sherry handling subscriptions. 



selves to me and said they had 
driven hours to get there and 
hear what I had to say, It works. 
Committees should look over 
the ham world for people who 
will have things to say which 
hams want to hear , , . and one 
way or another get these 
speakers In. All too many of the 
speakers are excruciatingly 
dull, so it isn't easy to find the 
hot ones. 
The 2,000 chairs in the hall 



were almost fully occupied, 
with over 1.500 estimated in the 
audience as I talked about ama- 
teur radio past, present, and 
future. That's not bad for a first 
hamfest in St. Louis, I'd say. I 
didn't see any League officials 
at the hamfest at all . . . and the 
League didn't even bother to 
have a booth! 

The hamfest committee is to 
be congratulated on putting on 
a first-rate show, having an in- 




In case any ARRLers who said that no hamfest could succeed 
without the support of the League have any fingering doubts, here 
is a picture of one part of the exhibits . . . and the whole place was 
packed like this, The ARRL, though invited, did not even bother to 
run a booth at the show and the local director refused to come. No 
one here was interested in politics, neither pro-ARRL nor con; it was 
a hamfest and a joyous one, It is a pity that the ARRL has to see 
every amateur function as a political threat. 



160 



teresting program (other than 
me), getting an exhibition hall 
full of exhibitors, and in doing 
all this in just a few weeks. The 
ARRL said there was no way to 
put on a good hamfest without 
starting a year ahead. Balder- 
dash. 

DALLAS AND ATLANTA 

So far, my commitments for 
talking at hamfests for the rest 
of this year include a barrage at 
Dallas in early June and at 
Atlanta in mid-June. I'll be giv- 
ing two tatks at both hamfests 
... one on amateur radio and 
what can be done to get it goi ng 
again, and the other on how to 
take advantage of the incredible 
opportunities for making money 
with microcomputers. I person- 
ally intend to increase my own 
net worth substantially during 
the next year or so, and thou- 
sands of others can get on the 
bandwagon . , , once they know 
tile secret of how to go about it. 

In September, HI be giving a 
talk at the Hartford ARRL Con- 
vention. Ill bet they'll hate that I 
Right in their home town! 

NOTHING CAN GO WRONG 

, . . GO WRONG 

... GO WRONG . . . 

Joke number 1254C, wherein 
the captain of the plane gets on 
the intercom and says, "This is 
flight 73X, now leaving Boston 
and flying nonstop to Seattle. 
This is the first fully-automated 
transcontinental flight run en- 
tirely by microcomputer. The 
system has been thoroughly 
tested and it is so dependable 
that it is no longer necessary 
for a flight crew to featherbed 
on these flights. Be assured 
that every contingency has 
been considered and nothing 
whatever can possibly go 
wrong ... go wrong ... go 
wrong . . . go wrong , , , ,n 

Which brings us to the 
ridiculous situation we've had 
with trying to keep up with sub- 
scriptions. If you get many 
magazines, you realize that we 
are not alone in trying to cope 
with the monumental screwups 
which computers can aggra- 
vate. Yes, I know all about com- 
puters not making mistakes, 
but I also know that program- 
mers, computer salesmen, 
computer manufacturers, and 
data-input people are capable 
of incredible botching and/or 
deceptions. 

Bill Blair, of the Country Jour- 
nal, recently devoted a full-page 
editorial to apologizing for 
subscription aggravations to 
readers, citing Fawcett Publica- 
tions as the cause of their mis- 
eries. Our problems stemmed 
from Data Input Service Corp, 
(DISC), down near Boston . . . 
with a big assist from Prime 
Computer, Inc. 

A few years ago, we handled 
all of the subscriptions for 73 by 



cutting a small mimeograph- 
type of stencil for each sub- 
scriber. This paper stencil was 
then filed in a rack by zip code 
and it took maybe a day or two 
to handle a subscription, com- 
plete with sending any desired 
back issues. When there was 
any problem, all we had to do 
was go to the file, puil out the 
stencil T and see what had gone 
wrong. It took maybe a couple 
of minutes. One girl was able to 
handle everything. 

Obviously, such an archaic 
system had to be improved. We 
called IBM and signed on the 
dotted line for what they recom- 
mended. It was an IBM 403 with 
keypunch and card sorter, it 
was so big and heavy that we 
had to have a special support in 
the basement to keep the floor 
from caving in. 

The 403 was no blessing. It 
took as long to punch a card for 
each subscriber as it had to cut 
a stencil . . . and longer to file 
the cards, which still had to be 
hand-filed. The 403 printer was 
not as fast at making labets as 
the Bliott paper stencil printer. 
Such was progress. 

After evaluating the net result 
of the new system, which cost 
about twice as much as the old 
one to use . . . and was slower, I 
started looking for an outside 
computer service to handle sub- 
sen pttons. I found one which 
was recommended highly by 
one of our advertisers (Waters 
Manufacturing ... it was also a 
subsidiary of Waters, so per- 
haps their enthusiasm was not 
without bias), and moved our 
subscription list there. Within 
three months we were in deep 
trouble. 

It took us several months to 
go back over past subscriber 
lists and find the well over 2,000 
subscribers who had been 
dropped seemingly at random 
by the computer, This outfit, 
which eventually became DISC, 
mumbled about dirt in the tape- 
read heads, or something. 

As the number of subscrip- 
tions and the number of prob- 
lems escalated, with our re- 
sponse time on looking up an- 
swers for angry readers going 
from the one or two days when 
we were doing everything 
ourselves to two and three 
months with the computer ser- 
vice, I got antsy to get things 
back on home ground. That was 
when I started calling computer 
firms to see what I needed, and 
it was then I found that com- 
puter folk had a language all 
their own which I couldn't 
understand. 

It was my attempt to cope 
with this language barrier which 
resulted in my starting Byte, if 
you remember that magazine. I 
eventually gave up trying to 
learn enough to outwit the com- 
puter salesmen and software 
houses and hired my own "ex- 



pert" to sort out the claims and 
promises of the computer firms. 
My expert checked out every- 
thing available and recommend- 
ed the Prime 300 computer as 
being the best for our appli- 
cation. I talked with the Prime 
salesmen and was assured that 
their system would be able to 
handle the subscriptions for 73, 
for Kilobaud MICROCOMPUT- 
ING, our accounting, Reader 
Service, prospective subscriber 
lists, industry lists, advertising 
lists and data, repeater lists, ar- 
ticle lists, daily orders, inven- 
tory, and a few other chores . . ♦ 
no problem. 

By mortgaging everything 
right down to the paper clips, 
we were able to buy a Prime 300. 
Our expert hired two full-time 
programmers to write programs 
for handling our subscriptions. 
One year later, we were ready to 
give it a try. We were desperate 
to use it because things had 
been going from bad to worse 
with the outside service. 

Once we had the subscrip- 
tions on our own system, the 
problems went from worse to 
total disaster. One 13-megabyte 
disk was not enough, said 
Prime, no matter what their 
salesmen had said. So, we 
bought a second drive. In no 
time at all, that one had bogged 
and clogged, and a third drive 
was needed immediately. 1 think 
they ran about $15,000 each, 
heading us for the poorhouse. 
When things still grunted to a 
halt, the diagnosis was a need 
for 64K additional internal 
memory . . . another $15,000. 

The subscriptions kept the 
computer from being usable for 
anything else at all. Reader Ser 
vice had to go back to being 
done by hand, the accounting 
had to be sent out to a service 
agency, the payroll was sent to 
another agency, and so it went. I 
finally made enough of a fuss 
that Prime sent a technician to 
see what was wrong. It was then 
that they discovered that the 
Prime operating system had no 
provision for reusing disk space 
which had been left free by ex- 
pired or moved subscribers. We 
were heading toward a need for 
hundreds of megabytes at this 
clip. Prime eventually came up 
with a mod for the operating 
system which ai lowed material 
to be deleted from a disk rather 
than just be ignored. 

Added to the system pro- 
gramming problems were 
troubles with keeping the equip- 
ment running, The disks were 
going down every few days, we 
had memory problems, the 
power supply went out every 
now and then, and so it went. 
We finally gave up trying to 
cope with it and went back to 
DISC wtth the subscriotions. 

Today, three years into own- 
ing the Prime 300, we are able to 
use it for handling the daily 



orders, Reader Service, and a 
few shorter lists . . , and that's 
about ali. Beyond that, it bogs 
down and little comes out. Td 
estimate that the system is able 
to do about 20% of what the 
Prime people promised— tops. 
I've been trying to get help from 
Prime on this, but they are so 
busy building new plants and 
selling larger systems that they 
seem unable to remember their 
sale of three years ago. 

I am no fan of IBM . . . indeed, 
when I had IBM come in to 
recommend a new computer 
system for us, they suggested a 
System 32, with floppy disks 
and no application program- 
ming available, I think that prob- 
ably would have been even 
worse than the Prime. But there 
is much to be said for buying a 
more-popular computer system 
and keeping away from smaller 
outfits such as Prime. It is 
almost Impossible to find pro- 
grammers or data-processing 
people with experience on the 
Prime. This means you have to 
hire people with little or no train- 
ing and send them to Prime 
school at your own expense. 
Then you have to put them to 
work for a year or so on a sys- 
tem for which you are paying 
(they are not cheap) and give 
them time to get experienced. 

The computer has been much 
more dependable since we fired 
all of the data-processing peo- 
ple who smoked. They swore up 
and down that the filters on the 
system would keep the smoke 
from hurting the disks, but disk 
failure now is rare with no 
smokers around. 

For a while it appeared that 
DISC was going to be able to 
cope with the subscriptions, but 
eventually the problems got 
worse and worse. Three-year 
subscribers were entered for 
one year, address changes 
brought duplicate, triplicate, or 
no copies. Requests for help 
went unanswered. It was a 
disaster. As the complaints 
grew, I got more and more 
frustrated. My circulation peo- 
ple daily assured me that every- 
thing was being taken care of. 
All letters were being answered. 
All missing issues were being 
sent. Then I found that one of 
our customer-service people 
had merely been putting prob- 
lems into a box and working on 
the top ones. There were about 
three-thousand unanswered 
complaints built up. 

I raised hell. It took about 
twelve full-time people to work 
out the problems over a period 
of months, but it was like 
building a sand castle with the 
tide coming in. As fast as 
a thousand problems were 
solved, the data-input people at 
the service bureau would create 
two thousand more. 

We shopped around for a 
long time, looking for a sub- 



161 



scrtption service {called 
fulfillment). We checked each 
one out with several of their 
customers because many mag- 
azines are having serious prob- 
lems with this, as reported by 
Bill Blair. The magazine 
publishing magazine, Fofio r 
often has grim stories of maga- 
zine fulfillment service prob- 
lems, so they are a sad fact of 
modern publishing life. 

All this is of little consolation 
to the innocent subscriber who 
gets caught in the middle of this 
mess. Since 1 subscribe to over 
200 publications per month, I 
frequently run into these 
frustrations myself. I haven't 
found any magazines yet which 
are out to screw anyone . , . the 
screwing is there* but not inten- 
tional I have found the circula- 
tion departments of most maga- 
zines to be as dedicated to help- 
ing the subscriber as ours, and 
just as frustrated as the 
subscribers over the problems. 

Those readers of 73 who have 
not been loused up by our cope- 
lessness are asked to check 
around to see if they have any 
friends who have been victim- 
ized. Tell them that we really 
think we have things in hand at 
last. Our new agency. FAI, in 
New York, seems to be getting 
good marks from the other 
magazines they handle and 
have been getting our problems 
squared away quite satisfacto- 
rily for the last two months. 

If you have written about a 
subscription problem and have 
not heard from us yet, you will 
receive a customer service 
report form In the next two to 
three weeks . . . this will speed 
up the handling of all problems 
and questions. Everyone here 
wants to have every subscriber 
happy and fulfilled. Please pass 
the word around at your club 
and over the air and let's make 
sure that everyone is made hap- 
py. 

DEALING WITH THE FCC 

The recent screwing of the 
hams by the FCC came as no 
surprise to those who are famil- 
iar with the way this govern- 
ment agency works. The real 
responsibility for the utter 
failure of the amateur communi- 
ty to come out of the situation 
with reasonable rules has to lie 
with both the ARRL and the ham 
industry. 

The League, by convincing 
most amateurs that amateur 
radio is welt represented by the 
ARRL, has discouraged any ini- 
tiative by either individuals or 
clubs. Indeed, the ARRL has 
done all it can to discourage 
any individual approach to the 
FCC by amateurs and clubs. 
The net result of this is that 
when the ARRL fails to provide 
representation, there is none by 
anyone, so the FCC goes right 
ahead without any guidance 
and terrible things go wrong. 



The FCC has been dealt with 
once in the last few years with 
great success. I hate to make a 
big deal out of this, but the 
results of this effort were so 
outstanding that it should not 
be swept under the table. I don't 
recall ever seeing even the 
slightest mention in QST of the 
ham/FCC meeting which 
brought about the complete 
turn of events with the FCC and 
the remarkable changes in re- 
peater regulations, deregu- 
lation of amateurs, and a great 
many other changes. 

Here's what happened. Ama- 
teurs in general were happy 
with the lack of restrictions on 
the use of repeaters and had 
adapted to the problems this 
lack of restrictions had caused 
by getting together and working 
out unofficial rules. We set up 
coordinating groups, repeater 
councils, got a national coor- 
dination plan working, etc, alt 
without any help from either the 
FCC or the ARRL 

A few amateurs insisted that 
we must have FCC regulations 
for repeaters. Years later, the 
FCC suddenly acted by an- 
nouncing brutally-restrictive 
rules and forcing the generation 
of incredible amounts of paper- 
work . . Ao no ones benefit. 
The ARRL refused to do any- 
thing about the situation, partly 
because they had very little con- 
tact with repeaters and partly 
because they didn't want to 
anger anyone at the FCC, 

Amateurs responded to the 
new rules by filing hundreds of 
petitions for reconsideration of 
the rules. Prose Walker, the 
chap in charge at the time, 
responded by throwing the 
whole lot in his wastebasket. I 
could see that we were going to 
get nowhere this way, so I 
decided it was time to do some- 
thing about it. 

Having been strongly in- 
strumental in the nationaliza- 
tion of repeater frequency pairs 
via my Repeater Bulletin 
(monthly newsletter to repeater 
groups) and FM symposiums 
around the country which 73 
sponsored, I contacted repeater 
groups and got them to send 
represent attves to Washington 
to testify before the FCC. I set 
up the hearing and got the 
seven FCC Commissioners and 
the repeater group represen- 
tatives into a hearing room and 
orchestrated a convincing dis* 
cussion of the need for dereg- 
ulating amateur radio. The 
ARRL, by the way. was asked to 
help with this and flatly refused. 
Right after the hearing, the 
League counsel took some of 
the visitors out to lunch and ex- 
plained patronizingly that this 
sort of approach would not work 
, ■„ \ a waste of time. 

It did work, The FCC Commis- 
sioners listened and were im- 
pressed, Wiley became chair- 
man of the FCC and implement- 



ed the deregulation of amateur 
radio which we requested. The 
hearing was In January, 1974, 
and soon after that the restric- 
tive repeater regulations began 
to be changed, Prose was "re- 
tired' 1 and amateur rules im- 
proved enormously. 

So what went wrong recent- 
ly? 

When the amateur industry 
gathered to testify before the 
Commissioners regarding ten 
meter Irnears, there was none of 
the cooperation which I had 
been able to bring to the 1974 
hearing, I had gotten my group 
together the day before the 
hearing and we had gone 
through just what we wanted to 
get across, how best to do it, 
who should discuss what and 
answer questions on it T etc. We 
had our act together. 

This time there was no act at 
all. ARMA, the manufacturers 
association, got people from in- 
dustry in to testify, but the 
ARRL's council was there and 
refused to cooperate with 
ARMA. Several of the manufac- 
turers refused to cooperate with 
ARMA. The result was that the 
ARRL testimony, which went on 
interminably, took the wind out 
of the sails of the ARMA repre- 
sentative. The whole presenta- 
tion was fumbling and lacked 
direction. Worse, no one had 
any concrete suggestions for 
anything to replace the FCC 
pian. The FCC didn't want to 
know what was wrong with their 
plan, they just wanted to do 
something. Without any alter- 
native to offer, hams lost the 
battle completely. 

I sat In on the discussions 
before the testimony and tried 
my best to get the manufactur- 
ers to provide a clear and co- 
herent approach to the situa- 
tion, complete with an easy out 
for the Commission. I got no* 
where with this. I have tapes of 
these meetings and the FCC 
testimony if any historian 
wishes to review the sorry event 
at some later date. 

After the fumbling and often 
emotional testimony by the 
ARRL and the industry, offering 
little constructive to the FCC t in 
came the EIA (Electronic Indus- 
tries Association) representa- 
tive. He had his act together. He 
got up. spoke for about five 
minutes, telling the FCC they 
were right, just exactly what 
they wanted to hear, and sat 
down. He won the day hands 
down. The score: CB— 1. hams 
—0. 

Sad to say. I see not even the 
slightest hint that either the 
ARRL or the ham industry has 
learned anything from this in- 
credible debacle. ARMA is talk- 
ing about paying a professional 
lobbyist in Washington, some- 
one who not only is not a ham, 
but who also doesn't even know 
anything about amateur radio! I 
agree that we desperately need 



some strong representation in 
Washington—that's where the 
action is. But I disagree on 
grasping at straws. We need an 
experienced ham, possibly re- 
tired, who can spend the time to 
keep the FCC acquainted with 
what amateurs need in the way 
of changed rules. He could also 
keep in contact with key con* 
gressmen and senators to help 
put pressure where it is needed, 
when tt is needed. 

We also need to get our act 
together and organize hearings 
before the FCC when we need 
them. These hearings should be 
carefully planned and run. The 
Commissioners have a lot big- 
ger pots to stir than amateur 
radio, so the more of their work 
we can do for them, the more 
cooperation we will get. We 
should try to remember that, 

You can bet that it anything 
does get going in the way of an 
International Amateur Radio 
Lobby, a great deal of the puga 
will be in Washington, where 
the power is. There is no reason 
why amateur radio should per- 
mit itself to be pushed around. 
We can't depend on the ARRL 
for these things, as we have 
seen all too clearly. If the 
League ever does decide to do 
something affirmative, then we 
can support them , . . but why 
support a vacuum? 

SEEK FAME AND FORTUNE 

Well, fame anyway. Getting 
published in 73 does often seem 
to pay off in wondrous ways. I'm 
talking about a lot more than 
Just the recognition you get at 
the club or in contacts over the 
air— which can be heady 
enough. Many authors have 
written to tell me about doors 
that an article has opened for 
them ... interesting jobs, con- 
sulting, etc. 

Getting published still has 
the effect of making you an "ex* 
pert" on a subject. It then 
follows that some firm some* 
where has a need For such an 
expert and you find yourself in 
demand. 

In addition to reflecting in the 
prominence a published article 
brings, there is the satisfaction 
of knowing that you've provided 
both education and entertain- 
ment to tens of thousands of 
people. How many times in your 
life can you reach out and touch 
that many people? 

If all that doesn't move you to 
a typewriter, then let's get crass 
about it and point out that 73 
pays hard cash for articles, and 
a lot more than any other ham 
magazine. Heck, one magazine 
seems to pay only if you get a 
lawyer to sue them for the pit- 
tance they promise. QST not on- 
ly doesn't pay one cent for the 
articles they publish, but also 
you don't even get word on 
when your article will appear or 
any chance to even see It before 
publication! No wonder they 



162 



have so little of any signifi- 
cance. 

With 73, you get paid upon ac- 
ceptance, not upon publication. 
This means you get paid right 
up front. Then, when your article 
is set in type and set up for 
publication, you will get a page 
proof of it to check over for any 
errors. You get to see it about 
the way it is going to appear in 
the magazine. And when it 
comes out, yourcall will be right 
there on the cover of the maga- 
zine. 

One other thing . . , QST has 
a practice of rewriting just 
about every article. This means 
that your golden prose will be 
put through the meat grinder by 
some hack and the resultant 
mush will be attributed 100% to 
you, even though you haven't 
been given a chance to defend 
yourself, There are an awful lot 
of furious eK-GSTauthors. Have 
you noticed how few regular 
contributors there are in QST 
other than their poorly-paid 
staff? How many paid-staff ar- 
ticles do you find we have to use 
to pad out 73 to a reasonable 
size? And we publish about 
three times as many pages of 
articles as QST per month. 

Another magazine strategem 
you want to watch out for is the 
small down payment, with the 



rest upon publication. This is a 
gem + It saves the magazine a 
bundle, obviously. It unfairly 
ties up the author, but without 
anything significant in pay. I 
understand that both Byte and 
Interface Age use this author- 
screwing system. And suppose 
they decide not to ever publish 
the article at all? You're help- 
less. So, for a few bucks, a 
magazine can keep articles 
which they have no intention of 
ever using from being sub- 
mitted to competitor maga- 
zines, 

it does take a substantial in- 
vestment inartlclestokeepupa 
magazine inventory. For in- 
stance, at around $50 a page for 
73, this means that the hundred 
pages of articles in an issue will 
tie up about $5,000. We carry an 
inventory of perhaps six months 
in articles normally . , . about 
$30,000 or so. 

What kind of articles are 
needed? Of course, the most- 
read articles are generally those 
about small construction proj- 
ects. We're open for anything at 
all . . . antennas, gadgets, com- 
plete receivers, transceivers, 
test equipment, shack acces- 
sories, repeaters, microcomput- 
ers with a ham accent, autocall 
systems, anything on DXing, 
expeditions, humor which will 



make me laugh, good cartoons 
(no amateurs at this, please . . , 
except radio amateurs), club ac- 
tivities, club projects, stories of 
transmitter hunts, interviews 
with famous hams, reviews of 
new equipment ... it is endless. 

How many antenna articles 
can we publish? Hundreds... 
anything new and interesting 
will get a thousand hams head- 
ing for their roofs. Perhaps 
you've hooked a computer up 
for some CW processing. An- 
tenna aiming? Digital circuits of 
almost any kind are read with 
great interest by most readers. 1 
look through the ads and wish 
we could get good interesting 
articles on every piece of new 
equipment I see. Sure, I wish I 
could be the one to use the gear 
and write it up myself, but I'm 
already spread much too thm, 
so as a practical matter. I'd like 
to see reader evaluations. Why 
not help pay for your equipment 
that way? 

Before you get a lot of ideas 
about conning manufacturers 
for free gear to be written up . . , 
no way. I flatly refuse to give 
anyone any prior agreement to 
publish anything. I want people 
who have spent their hard- 
earned money to cash in on this, 
not some sharpy on the con. 



Manufacturers, please go with 
me on this: Unless you hear 
from me personally about 
someone going to test some- 
thing, do not get suckered into 
someone saying they are going 
to write an article on the equip- 
ment and therefore should get it 
free or for a discount. If I hear 
about it, no deal. 

RTTY . . . I want a lot more 
material on RTTY. i want it on 
OSCAR and equipment for us- 
ing OSCAR, J want updates on 
new stuff for SSTV. Let's keep it 
going. How about more info on 
TV satellite reception? How 
about weather satellite informa- 
tion? There are so many things 
going on that I don't understand 
the chap who calls up and says 
he would like to write an article 
but doesn't know what to write 
about 

FEBRUARY WINNER 

For the second time in four 
months (he was also our No- 
vember winner), Dr. Ralph E. 
Taggart WB8DQT has walked 
away with our $100 "Most 
Popular Article" check. Our 
readers used their Reader Ser- 
vice card ballots to select "At- 
tention, Satellite Watchers!" as 
their favorite article in the 
February issue. 



FCC 



Reprinted from the Federal Register. 



Amendment of Rules Concerning the 
Amateur Radio Service to Permit the 
Acceptance by Any Commission 
Office of Code Credit Certificates 

AQENCr: Federal Communication a 
Commie si on. 

action: Order [rule amendment). 



Tt The Commission amends 
§ 07.25 of iia rules regulating the 
amateur radio service to permit the 
acceptance by any Commission office of 
Code Credit Certificates. Certificates are 
i&sued to applicants Tor amateur radio 
operator licenses who have completed 
the telegraphy elements of their 
examinations but fail the written 
elements. This action Is taken to lessen 
the burden on those applicants who 
wish to complete the examination at an 
office other than the one at which the 
telegraphy portion was taken 

EFFECTIVE DATE: April 20, 1879. 

adores 3: Federal Communications 
Commission, Washington. D.C. 205S4, 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: 

Mr. |. B. Johnston. Private Radio Bureau, 
(202) 254-6054, 
SUPPUEMEHTAftV INFORMATION: 

In the mailer of amendment of § 9 07,3 
and 97.25(b) of the Commission's Rules: 
Order, 

Adopt ecL February 22. 1079. 

Rtlea*ed April A. 1373. 

By the Commission. 

1. By an Order released on June 7. 
197a effective June 16, 1978, the 
Commission amended §| 0.314. 1,922 
and 97-25 of its Rules to provide for the 
issuance of Amateur Code Credit 
Certificates by the Engineer in Charge at 
each of Its field offices. Certificates are 
issued to applicants for amateur radio 
operator licenses who successfully 



complete the telegraphy element of their 
examinations but fail the required 
written element Section 97.25[b] 
currently provides that upon 
presentation of the Certificate to the 
Commission within one year of the date 
of Us issuance, the applicant will be 
given credit for the telegraphy element 
at the speed listed The purpose of the 
Certificate is to allow an applicant to 
receive his/her amateur License upon 
successful completion of the remaining 
examination elements) without having 
to retake the telegraphy test 

2. Section 97.25{bJ currently provides 
that an Amateur Code Credit Certificate 
will be honored only at the Commission 
office which issued IL This restriction 
waa intended to allow Commission 
personnel to validate the authenticity of 
certificates presented for credit. 
However, it has also imposed a hardship 
on some applicants who wish to 
complete their examinations at an office 
other than the one at which they took 
their telegraphy test. Thus far, there has 
been no problem with attempts to falsify 
Certificates, Interim Amateur Permits 
and Temporary Radio Operator 
Authorizations may also be presented to 
gain examination credit toward higher 
classes of radio operator licenses- These 
documents are accepted at any 
Commission office and their 
authentication at offices other than the 
issuing one has not been difficult Aa it 
appears that the more restrictive 
acceptance of Code Credit Certificates 
is unwarranted, the Commission is 
herewith amending £ $?.25(oj to delete 
this restriction, Further, in order to 
formalize and clarify the criteria utilized 
for the issuance of the Certificate, the 
Commission now amends § 97.3 to 
include a definition of "Amateur Code 
Credit Certificate." and $ B?AS[h) to 



specify the conditions under which such 
Certificates are issued. 

3. As these amendments serve to 
clarify Commission procedures and to 
eliminate an unnecessary restriction, the 
Commission, pursuant to Section 553(b) 
of the Administrative Procedure Act 
finds that prior public notice and the 
receipt of comments are unnecessary. 
Additionally, in order to expeditiously 
eliminate any confusion and 
inconvenience now caused to those 
taking amateur radio opera Ipr 
examinations, the Commission, pursuant 
to S 553(b)(3) of the Administrative 
Procedure Act finds that it is desirable 
thai these amendments be made 
effective with less than 30 days nonce. 

4. Accordingly, IT IS ORDERED, 
effective April 20, 1979. that Part 97 of 
the Commission's Rules and Regulations 
IS AMENDED as shown below. The 
authority for this action it found in 
Sections 4(i] and 303 of the 
Communications Ac! of 1934* aa 
amended. For further information on 
these Rule changes contact Mr. J. B, 
Johnston, Personal Radio Branch, FCC* 
1919 M Street NW> Washington. DC 
20554. Tele: (202J 254-6884. 

(Sera. 4. 303, 48 Stat, .ik amended, 1066. 1082; 
4? U3C, 154 r 303] 

Federal CoRununlcationi ConuDlsaioo, 

Wlfflnl. 



Part 97 of Chapter I of Title 47 of the 
Code of Federal Regulations is 
u follows: 

In f 97.3, a new paragraph (aa) is 
added as follows; 



197.3 



(a a) Amateur Code Credit Certificate. 
A certificate issued to applicants for an 
amateur operator license evidencing 
successful completion of a telegraphy 
examination element. 

In 3 97,25 paragraph (b) is amended to 
read as follows; 

5 97.25 Examination ervdtt. 
* * * * * 

(b) Amateur Code Credit Certificates 
(FCC Form 845] will be issued by the 
engineers in Charge of FCC offices to 
applicants for amateur operator licenses 
who successfully complete telegraphy 
examination elements 1(A). 1(B] or 1(C). 
but who fail the associated written 
examination element [s) Upon 
presentation of a properly completed 
Amateur Code Credit Certificate, the 
FCC shall give the applicant for an 
amateur radio operator license 
examination credit for the code speed 
I i Bled on the Amaleur Code Credit 
Certificate. An Amateur Code Credit 
Certificate is valid for a period of one 
year from the date of its issuance. 



Ham Help 



I have a basin with four 
ultrasonic transducers affixed 
to the underside, I would like to 
get in touch with someone who 
has a circuit diagram and in- 
structions to build an ultrasonic 
cleaner with a basin such as 
mine. I would also like to know 



how to determine the resonant 
frequency of these transducers 
and whether they must all be 
driven in phase. 

Paul Leduc VE2DFL 

76 17th Avenue 

Roxboro, Quebec 

Canada H8Y 3A4 



163 



Social Events 



from page 26 

will be June 10, 1979. For infor- 
mation, contact Henry Wener 
WB2ALW, 53 Sherrard St„ East 
Hills NY 11577, or phone (516)- 
829-5880 days or (516H84-4323 
nights. 

CHELSEA Ml 

JUN 3 

The Chelsea Swap T n Shop 
will be held on Sunday, June 3 T 
1979, at the Chelsea Fair 
grounds, Chelsea. Michigan. 
Gates will open for sellers at 
5:00 am and for the public from 



8:00 am until 3:00 pm. Admis- 
sion is SI .50 i n advance or $2,00 
at the gate. Children under 
twelve and non*ham spouses 
are admitted free. Talk*in on 
146.52 and 146.37/.97. Proceeds 
will benefit the Dexter High 
School Radio Club and the 
Chelsea Communications 
Club. 

STEVENS POINT Wl 
JUN 3 

The Central Wisconsin Radio 
Amateurs, Ltd., will hold its 
swapfest picnic on Sunday, 
June 3, 1979, starting at 10:00 



am at Bukolt Park, Stevens 
Point* Wisconsin. There wili be 
a picnic area, refreshments, 
equipment sales, and prizes. 
For information, write to Frank 
L. Guth W9BCC, Secretary- 
Treasurer, Central Wisconsin 
Radio Amateurs, Ltd., 1632 
Ellis Street, Stevens Point Wl 
54481. 

WEST HUNTINGTON WV 

JUN 3 

The Tri-State ARA will hold its 
17th annual hamfest and family 
picnic on June 3, 1979, starting 
at 10:00 am, at the Camden 
Amusement Park, West Hunt- 
ington, West Virginia, There will 
be a planned program for the 
XYL and kids, or you can enjoy 
the amusement park if you pre- 



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Phones; (305) 771-2050 771*2051 



fer. There is a possibility the 
FCC will administer amateur ex- 
ams. There will be major prizes, 
a large flea market, exhibitors. 
and displays- Dealers are al- 
ways welcome to space in the 
covered pavilion. Talk-in on 
34/94 or 16/76. For more infor- 
mation, write TARA, PO Box 
1295 t Huntington WV 25715. 

MANASSAS VA 
JUN 3 

The 0\e Virginia Hams 
Amateur Radio Club, Inc.. will 
hold its annual hamfest on June 
3, 1979, at the Prince William 
County Fairgrounds, located Yi 
mile south ot Manassas, Virgin- 
ia, on Rte. 234. Gates will open 
at 8:00 am but tailgaters may 
enter at 7;00 am, General admis- 
sion is $3.00 per person, with 
children under 12 admitted free. 
Tailgating is $2.00 per vehicle, 
with over 300 spaces available. 
Prizes include a 5-band SSB 
transceiver, a synthesized 2 
meter transceiver, and a Bird 43 
wattmeter, plus many more. 
Breakfast and lunch are avail- 
able on the premises. Featured 
will be an FM clinic, a YL pro- 
gram, a children's program, CW 
proficiency, and QSL bureau 
programs. Indoor exhibit space 
for dealers and manufacturers 
is available. For information, 
write to Sam Lebowich 
WB4HAV T OVHARa PO Box 
1255, Manassas VA 22110. 

ALLENWOOD PA 
JUN 3 

The 8th annual Milton 
Amateur Radio Club Hamfest 
will be held on June 3 T 1979, 
rain or shine, at the All en wood 
Firemen's Fairgrounds, lo- 
cated on US Rte. 15, 4 miles 
north of Interstate SO, Allen- 
wood, Pennsylvania. Hours are 
from 8:00 am to 5:00 pnru Regis- 
tration for sellers is $2.50 ad- 
vance or $3.00 at the gate, XYLs 
and children are free. Featured 
will be a flea market, an auc- 
tion, a contest, cash door 
prizes, a free portable and 
mobile FM clinic, and super- 
vised children's activities. 
There will be an indoor area 
available, plus food and 
beverages. Talk-in on ,37/.97, 
.34/.94, and .52. For further 
details, call or write Kenneth 
Hering WA3UU, RD #1 , Box 381 , 
Allen wood PA 17810, or phone 
(717)-538-9168. 

PRINCETON IL 
JUN 3 

The Starved Rock Radio Club 
will hold its annual hamfest on 
Sunday, June 3, 1979, at the 
Bureau County Fairgrounds, 
Princeton, Illinois. The fair- 
grounds are centrally located 
and easily reached via routes 
80-6-34-89-26, Watch for the 
large yellow "Hamfest 1 ' signs. 
There will be tots of room for the 
free swappers' area and park- 



184 



P* Reader Service— see page 195 



ing. New equipment dealers, 
manufacturers, and their repre- 
sentatives are invited to request 
details on reserving space in 
our inside display area. There 
will be food and refreshments 

available during the day. 
Camper, van, and trailer spaces 
are available for a nominal fee 
and should be reserved in ad- 
vance. Please include an SASE 
for map, motel information, and 
advance reservations at $1.50, if 
postmarked before May 20 
($2.00 at the gate). For more in- 
formation, write W9MKS/ 
WR9AFG, Starved Rock Radio 
Club, RFD #1, Box 171, Oglesby 
IL 61348, or phone (815)-667- 
4614. 

GUELPH ONT CAN 
JUN9 

The Central Ontario Amateur 
Radio Ftea Market will be held 
on Saturday, June 9, 1979, from 
8:00 am unti I 4:00 pm at Centen- 
nial Arena, College Ave. W., 
Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Com- 
mercial displays will open at 
10:00 am. Admission is 75$ per 
person with children 12 years 
and under admitted free. Ad- 
mission for vendors is an addi- 
tional $2,00. There will be a 
large indoor and outdoor flea 
market, commercial exhibits, 
free balloons, free handouts, 
and operating ham stations. 
Taik-in on ,52/. 52, .37/. 97 
VE3KSR, and .96Z.36 VE3ZMG. 

MEADVILLE PA 
JUN9 

The Crawford Amateur Radio 
Society will hold its fifth annual 
hamfesf on Saturday, June 9, 
1979, at Crawford County Fair- 
grounds, Meadville, Penn- 
sylvania. Admission is $2.00- 
Gates will open at 8:00 am. 
Bring your own tables. The cost 
to display is $2.00 for an inside 
area and $1.00 for an outside 
area. There will be door prizes, 
refreshments, and commercial 
displays. Talk-in on .04/. 64, 
.61/. 21, .63/.03. For details, 
write CARS f Hamfest Commit- 
tee, PO Box 653 n Meadville PA 
16335. 

BEMIDJI MN 
JUN9 

A hamfest will be held on 
June 9-10, 1979, at Bemidji Fair- 
grounds, on the west side of 
town on Highway 2, Bemidji, 
Minnesota, There will be a com- 
plete program for hams, non- 
hams, and kids- Camping will be 
available on Saturday night. 
Tables are available at no 
charge. Tickets are $1,50. Talk- 
in on 146.34/.94 and 3935, For 
more information, write Jerry 
Pottratz WB0MSH, Rte. 2, Box 
239B S Bemidji MN 56601. 

SENATOBIA MS 
JUN 9-10 

The fourth annual Tri-State 



Hamfest will be held on June 
9-10, 1979, in the coliseum of 
Northwest Junior College, 
Senatobia, Mississippi. Indoor 
air-conditioned space will be 
available for manufacturers, 
dealers, and distributors. For 
information, contact Joel P. 
Walker, 1979 Hamfest Chain 
man. PO Box 276, Hernando MS 
38632; (6011-368-5277. 

POMONA NJ 
JUN 10 

The Short Points Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 2nd an- 
nual Atlantic City Area Ham- 
fest and Electronic Fleamarket 
on Sunday, June 10, 1979, from 



8:00 am to 4:00 pm, rain or 
shine, at Stockton State Col- 
lege Campus, Pomona, New 
Jersey. There will be free park- 
ing spaces, climate-controlled 
indoor sales area, clean rest- 
rooms, good food at realistic 
prices, paved and shaded tail- 
gate area, free ac power at the 
indoor tables, and two chairs 
provided with each table rental. 
Featured will be door prizes, 
commercial exhibitors, free 
technical seminars, group 
meetings, and contests. Regis- 
tration is $2.00 per person, wrth 
children under 12 free. Tail- 
gating is $2.00 per car space, 
while the indoor sales area is 



$5.00 at the gate; bring your 
own table. The indoor sales 
area has an advance registra- 
tion of only $5.00, which in- 
cludes a table and two chairs. 
SPARC will give a free table 
and two chairs for each space 
rented to the first 80 persons to 
pre-register. Deadline for this 
special is June 1st. For infor- 
mation, write Monte Tremont 
WB2EYF, PO Box 142, Absecon 
NJ 08201, or phone (609)- 
266-2678. 

MONROE Ml 
JUN 10 

The Monroe County Radio 
Communication Association 



Now from 
J. W. Miller 



DAWA 



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t** Header Service— see page TS5 



T65 



will hold its annual hamfest 
Swap and Shop on June 10, 
1979, from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm at 
the Monroe County Community 
College on Raisinville Rd. off 
M-50, Monroe, Michigan. Dona- 
tion is $1 .00 at the gate. There 
will be plenty of free parking, 
free trunk sales and indoor 
table space. Features will in- 
clude a contest, an auction, 
commercial displays, and UHF, 
VHF, and HF technical ses- 
sions and demonstrations. 
Talk-in on 146. 13/. 73 or ,52, For 
reservations and information, 
contact Fred Lux WD8ITZ, PO 
Box 982, Monroe Ml 48161. 



AKRON OH 

JUN10 
The Goodyear Amateur Ra- 
dio Club will hold its 12th an- 
nual hamfest picnic and flea 
market on Sunday, June 10, 
1979, from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm 
at Goodyear Wingfoot Lake 
Park, near Rtes. 224 and 43, 
east of Akron, Ohio, There will 
be five main prizes, including a 
Yaesu FT-101ZD, a Midland 
13-510, a Wilson Mark ll r a 
Drake MN-4C, and a Bird watt- 
meter. Featured will be a large 
flea market, auction, and picnic 
area. Tickets are $3.00 each or 
two for $5.00. Talk-in on 



146.04/64. For more informa- 
tion, contact D. W. Rogers 
WA8SXJ, 161 South Hawkins 
Ave., Akron OH 44313. 

OAK RIDGE TN 
JUN 14-15 

The Oak Ridge Amateur 
Radio Ctub will hold the Oak 
Ridge Amateur Radio Conven- 
tion and Hamfest '79 on July 
14-15, 1979, at the Oak Ridge 
Civic Center, Oak Ridge, Ten- 
nessee, Admission is $1,00. 
There will be commercial and 
flea market exhibitors. FCC ex- 
ams will be given on Saturday at 
8:00 am. Features for the ladies 



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and kids include movies, a tour 
of the Museum o1 Science and 
Energy, or the pool, picnic, and 
playgrounds at the Civic Center. 
Camping facilities, motels, and 
restaurants are conveniently 
located. The week of July 9-16 
will be proclaimed Amateur 
Radio Week in Oak Ridge by the 
Mayor. TaIMn on 146.88, 147*72, 
and 146.82. Local talk-in on 
146.S2* Anyone interested 
should contact Charles Byrge 
WB40BE, PO Box 291, Oak 
Ridge TN 37830. 

DUNELLEN NJ 
JUN 16 

The Raritan Valley Radio 
Club will hold its eighth annual 
hamfest on Saturday , June 16, 
1979, from 8:00 am to 4:30 pm at 
Columbia Park, Dunellen, New 
Jersey. For details, write 
Raritan Valley Radio Club, RD 
3, Box 317, Somerset NJ 08873, 
or phone WB2MNE at (201)- 
356-8435. 

MIDLAND Ml 
JUN 16 

The Central Michigan Ama- 
teur Repeater Association, Inc., 
will hold its fifth annual Midland 
Hamfest on Saturday, June 16, 
1979 f from 8:00 am until 3:00 pm 
at the Midland County Fair- 
grounds, Midland, Michigan. 
There will be door prizes with a 
drawing at 2:30 pm, Tickets are 
a $2.50 donation at the door, 
with XYL and junior op free on 
the OM's ticket. There will also 
be several computer displays. 
Tables will be available. An auc- 
tion will be held at 1:00 pm for 
gear that isn't sold. Talk-in on 
.13/.73and,52. 

JACKSONVILLE IL 
JUN 17 

The Jacksonville Area Ama- 
teur Radio Club will hold its 
14th annual hamfest and flea 
market on June 17, 1979, at the 
Morgan County Fairgrounds, 
Jacksonville, Illinois. Tickets 
are $1.50 each or 4 for $5.00. 
There will be indoor facilities, a 
camping area with a minimum 
fee, and food available on the 
grounds. Coffee and donuts 
will be served from 8:00-9:00 
am. Talk-in on ,52/, 52. 

TORRINGTON CT 
JUN 17 

The CQ Radio Club will hoid 
its flea market and hamfest, 
rain or shine, on June 17, 1979, 
from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm at the 
Torrington Fish and Game As- 
sociation grounds, located at 
Weed Rd., just off Rte. #4, be- 
tween Torrington and Goshen, 
Connecticut, Admission is 
$1.00 per person including your 
vehicle. Children and ladies are 
free. Food and refreshments 
wilf be available at reasonable 
prices. There will also be prizes, 
plenty of parking, table space, 
and activities for the children. 



166 



u^ Reader Service— see page 195 



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Talk-in on .52 and 147.84/.24. For 
more details, contact Ed Jose- 
fow W1 JSU at (203)-482-1 837. 

CROWN POINT IN 

JUN 17 
The Lake County Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 16th an- 
nual Dad's Day Hamfest on 
June 17, 1979, from 6:00 am un- 
til 5:00 pm at the Lake County 
Fairgrounds, Crown Point, In- 
diana. The event is all indoors. 
Donation is $1.50 in advance 
and $2.00 at the door. Table 
space is available on a first- 
come, first-served basis. There 
will be refreshments, a picnic 
area, ample parking, and a zoo 
and playground area for the 
children. Talk-in on 147.84/.24. 
For information and advanced 
tickets, write LCARC, PO Box 
1909, Gary IN 46409. 

BARNESVILLE PA 
JUN 17 

The Schuylkill Amateur Re- 
peater Association wifl hold its 
2nd annual hamfest on Sunday, 
June 17, 1979 t at Lake wood 
Park. Barnesville, Pennsylvania, 
along Rte. 54, 3 miles east of 
Exit 37E on Interstate 81 . Gates 
open at 9:00 am, rain or shine. 
Registration is $2.00, with XYL 
and children free and tailgaters 
$1.00 additional- Indoor tables 
are available at $2.00 per table. 
There will be large indoor and 
outdoor display areas, prizes, 
plenty of parking space, amuse- 
ment rides, picnic tables, and 
refreshments. Talk-in on 14778/ 
.18 and 146.52. For more infor- 
mation, write SARA Hamfest, 
PO Box 901, Pottsville PA 17901. 

LOUISVILLE KY 
JUN 29 JUL 1 

The Louisville Area Comput- 
er Club will hold its 4th annual 



ComputerfestTM 1979 from 
June 29 through July 1, 1979, at 
the Bluegrass Convention 
Center, Louisville, Kentucky. 
Activities include a flea market, 
seminars, and exposition, as 
well as activities for the entire 
family. Seminar and exposition 
admission is $4.00. Pre-reg- 
istered Ramada Inn guests 
$29.00, single; $34.00, double) 
receive free admission. For ad- 
vance mail information, write 
Computerfest f 79, Louisville 
Area Computer Club, PO Box 
70355, Louisville KY 40270, or 
phone Tom Eubank, Chairman, 
at(502)-B95-1230, 

BELLEFONTAINE OH 
JUL1 

The Champaign Logan Ama- 
teur Radio Club, Inc., will hold 
its annual hamfest on Sunday H 
July 1 T 1979, at the Logan Coun- 
ty Fairgrounds, South Main 
Street and Lake Avenue, 
Bellefontaine, Ohio. There will 
be free admission and door 
prizes. Trunk and table sales 
are $1.00, and there will also be 
a bid table. Talk-in on 146.52. 
For more information, contact 
John L. Wentz W8HFK, Box 
102, West Liberty OH 43357, or 
Frank Knuil W8JS, 402 Lafay- 
ette Ave, t Urbana OH 43078. 

DUNKIRK NY 
JUL1 

The Northwestern Mew York 
Repeater Association and the 
Northern Chautauqua Amateur 
Radio Club will hold their Lake 
Erie International Hamfest on 
Sunday, July 1, 1979, at the 
fairgrounds in Dunkirk, New 
York. A large flea market area 
and plenty of free parking wilt 
be provided, Tickets are $4,00 
at the gate or $3.00 in advance. 
RV hookups are available. For 
information on advance sales 



or for a map showing easy 
directions from I-90, write to 
Dick Brinkerhoff WB2HEF, 123 
5th St., Dunkirk NY 14048. 

HARRISBURG PA 
JUL 4 

The Harrisburg RAC will hold 
its annual Firecracker Hamfest 
on Wednesday, July 4, 1979, at 
the SheilsvMIe VFW picnic 
grounds, 1-81 north, Exit #27 or 
#28, Racetrack Exit, Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. Look for the large 
balloon. Admission is $3,00, 
with no charge for tailgating. 
Tables will be available in the 
pavilion. Talk-in on .52/. 52. 

WELLINGTON OH 
JUL 7 

The Northern Ohio Amateur 
Radio Society will hold its sec- 
ond annual NOARSFEST on 
Saturday, July 7, 1979, at the 
Lorain County Fairgrounds, one 
mile west of Rte, 58 on Rte, 18, 
Wellington, Ohio. Admission 
tickets are $1.50 in advance and 
$2.00 at the gate and are good 
for all prize drawings. Children 
under 12 are admitted free. 
Gates open for the sellers and 
dealers at 6:00 am and to the 
public from 7:00 am to 5:00 pm. 
Indoor deaier tables are $4,00 
each by advance registration. 
Drawing-only tickets are avail- 
able by man or at the gate for 
$1,00 each. Flea market spaces 
are $1.00 each. There will be 
over 100 prizes, including a Den- 
Tron HF-200 transceiver, a Ten- 
Tec 509, a DenTron GLA-1000, a 
Wilson Mark II, and an Optoelec- 
electronics counter. There will 
be plenty of food and free park- 
ing. Featured will be a large in- 
door exhibit hall for dealers and 
a huge blacktopped midway for 
flea market and trunk sales. 
There will be free camping out- 
side the gates on Friday night, 



but no hookups. For advance 
registration, information, or 
tickets, write NOARSFEST, PO 
Box 354, Lorain OH 44052. 

INDIANAPOLIS IN 

JUL 8 

The Indianapolis Amateur 
Radio Association will sponsor 
the Indianapolis Hamfest on 
Sunday, July 8, 1979, at the 
Marion County Fairgrounds, on 
the southeast corner of Indi- 
anapolis at the intersection of 
Interstates 74 and 465, Indian- 
apolis t Indiana. There will be 
commercial exhibitors and 
dealer displays for a fee of 
$30.00 per booth, The commep 
cial building will be open from 
12:00 noon until 9:00 pm on 
Saturday and will reopen at 7:00 
am on Sunday. Camper hookup 
facilities are available on the 
fairgrounds for overnight park- 
ing if you arrive on Saturday. A 
food and drink vendor will have 
a setup outside, while a profes- 
sional caterer will have facil- 
ities inside, For more informa- 
tion, write to the Indianapolis 
Hamfest, PO Box 1002, Indian- 
apolis IN 46206. 

i 

OAK CREEK Wl 
JUL 14 

The South Milwaukee Ama- 
teur Radio Club will hold its an- 
nual Swapfest 79 on Saturday, 
July 14, 1979, at American 
Legion Post #434, 9327 S. 
Shepard Avenue, Oak Creek, 
Wisconsin. Admission is $2.00 
and includes a happy hour with 
free beverages. Prizes include a 
$100 first prize, a $50 second 
prize, and a variety of other 
prizes. Activities will begin at 
7:00 am and continue until 5:00 
pm. Parking, a picnic area, hot 
and cold sandwiches, and liquid 
refreshments will be available 
on the grounds. Overnight 



f* Reader Service— see page 195 



167 



camping is also available. Talk- 
In on 146.94, More details, in- 
cluding a map, may be obtained 
from the South Milwaukee Ama- 
teur Radio Club, lnc +T Robert 
Kastelic WB9TIK t Secretary, PO 
Box 102, South Milwaukee Wl 
53172. 

TERRE HAUTE IN 
JUL 15 

The 33rd annual WVARA 

Hamfest will be held on July 15* 
1979, at the Vigo County Fair- 
grounds, one mile south of 1-70 
on US 41, Terre Haute, Indiana. 
Overnight camping will be avail- 
able. There will be a free flea 
market, a covered flea market at 
$2,00 for a 12 T x 1Z space with 
some tables and ac available. 
XYL bingo, food, refreshments, 
and valuable prizes. Advance 
ticket sales are $1.50 or 4 for 
$5.00. Tickets at the gate are 
$2,00 or 3 for $5,00, with 
children under 12 free. Talk-in 
on .25/,85 and .52. For tickets 
and information, send an SASE 
to WVARA Hamfest, PO Box 81 1 
Terre Haute IN 47808. 

ALLENTOWN PA 
JUL 15 

The Delaware-Lehigh ARC, 
Inc., the BGYE, Inc., and the 
Lehigh Valley ARC, Inc., will 
hold their Tri-Ciub Hamfest on 
July 15, 1979, from 8:00 am to 
4:00 pm at the Allentown Police 
Academy pistol range on Le- 
high Parkway South at Allen- 
town, Pennsylvania. Admission 
is $2.00 for lookers and $4.00 for 
sellers. Talk-in on .34Z.94 and 
.52. 

WILKES-BARRE PA 

JUL 15 

The Broadcasters Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 2nd an- 
nual hamfest on Jufy 15, 1979, 
from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm at 
Pocono Downs Racetrack, Rte. 
315, four miles north of Wilkes* 
Barre, Pennsylvania. Setup 
begins at 8:00 am. Admission is 
$2.50, with no additional fee for 
sellers, XYLs and children are 
free. The event is all indoors. 
Talk-in on 147.66/.06 or 146.52. 
For more information, write 
John Soha W3KU, 62 S. Frank- 
lin Street, Wilkes-Barre PA 
18707, or phone (717J-B23-3101. 

CANTON OH 
JUL 15 

The fifth annual Hall of Fame 
Hamfest will be held on Sunday, 
July 15, 1979, at Stark County 
Fairgrounds, Canton, Ohio. 
Tickets are $2.50 in advance 
and $3.00 at the gate. Mobile 
check-in on .19/79 or .S2/.52. For 
information, contact Max 
Lebold WABSHP, 10877 Hazel- 
view Ave., Alliance OH 44601. 

GUANAJUATO MEX 
JUL 19 21 

The first annual ARARM- 



LMRE will be held in Guana- 
juato, Mexico, from July 19*21 t 
1979. Guanajuato is located 
230 mites north of Mexico City. 
Registration wilt be US $13 + 00. 
A package will be available for 
US $40.00 and will include 2 
banquets, 1 dinner dance, 
sight-seeing, theater, and gifts. 
Drawings will be held, with a 
grand prize being an SSTV 
setup, A total of 500 prizes will 
be given away. The US $40.00 
includes registration. Hotels 
are available with prices rang- 
ing from US $10,00 and up for a 
double room. English-speaking 
guides are available from the 
University of Guanajuato. Talk- 
in on 147.63/.03, 146.10/70, and 
149.22/.82. HFiSSB frequencies 
will also be operating, and we 
hope to arrange special li- 
censes for visiting hams who 
may wish to operate from XE1- 
land during their stay. There 
will be a flea market and 
demonstrations at the conven- 
tion halL For more information, 
contact the Radio Club Leon, 
PO Box 12A, Leon, Guanajuato, 
Mexico* 

EUGENE OR 
JUL 21-22 

The 4th annual Lane County 
Ham Fair will be held on July 
21-22, 1979, at the Oregon Na- 
tional Guard Armory, 2515 Cen- 
tennial Blvd., Eugene, Oregon. 
Registration is $3.00, and an ex- 
tra drawing ticket is given with 
advance registration. There will 
be displays, lectures, contests, 
swapshop, transmitter hunt, 
and entertainment. The facili- 
ties provide plenty of free park- 
ing for motor homes and trail- 
ers. 

For Information and advance 
reservations, phone or write 
Wanda or Earl Hemenway. 2366 
Madison, Eugene OR 97405 at 
(503J-485-5575. 

ESSEX MT 
JUL 21-22 

The International Glacier- 
Waterton Hamfest will be held 
on July 21-22, 1979, at the Three 
Forks Campground, ten miles 
east of Essex, Montana, on US 
Highway 2. Registration is at 
9:00 am. TaIMn on ,52 and 
,34/.94. For more information, 
write GlacierWaterton Ham- 
fest, PO Box 2225, Missoula MT 
59806. 

PITTSFIELD MA 
JUL 21-22 
The NoBARC Hamfest will be 
held on July 21*22, 1979 t at Cum- 
mington Fairgrounds. Pittsfield, 
Massachusetts. There will be 
tech talks, demonstrations, and 
dealers. Flea market admission 
is $1.00. Advance registration is 
$3.00 single and $5/00 with 
spouse, and $4>00/$6,0G at the 
gate. Gates open at 5:00 pm on 
Friday for free camping. Talk-in 



on 146.31/.91. For reservations, 
contact Tom Hamilton WA1 VPX, 
206 California Ave,, Pittsfield 
MA 01201. 

GOLDEN CO 
JUL 22 

The Rocky Mountain Radio 
League. Inc., will hold its Field 
Demonstration Day and Swap- 
test on July 22, 1979, at 
the home of Karl Ramstetter 
WAQHJZ, which is located on 
Highway 93, Golden Gate Can- 
yon Road. This is accessible by 
going one mile north of the city 
limits of Golden, turning west- 
ward off Highway 93 onto 
Golden Gate Canyon Road, pro- 
ceeding for approximately IVi 
miles, and making a right turn 
across the cattle guards. Signs 
will be posted for further direc- 
tions. There will be demonstra- 
tions, including slow-scan TV 
and computers, door prizes, and 
a potluck lunch, with soft drinks 
and ice supplied by the League. 
It would be appreciated if 
everyone would make his con- 
tribution to the potluck lunch by 
bringing his favorite dish and 
helping out the League with any 
spare blankets and chairs. 
There will be camping facilities 
available for campers, trailers, 
mobile homes, etc., on Saturday 
afternoon before the Fest No 
dogs, guns, or motorbikes, 
please. 

MARSHALL MO 
JUL 22 

The Indian Foothills Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 4th an- 
nual hamfest on July 22, 1979, 
at the Saline County Fair- 
grounds, Marshall, Missouri. 
Tickets are $2.00 each or 3 for 
$5.00 tn advance; $2.50 at the 
door. Registration is at 8:00 am, 
with lunch at 11:30 pm (all you 
can eat) and the drawing at 2:30 
pm. Prizes include a Tempo S1, 
a Dentron Jr. MonitorTM tuner, 
and many more. There will be 
flea markets for the OM and 
XYL. There is no charge for flea 
market tables this year, but 
reservations are requested. 
There will also be old and new 
equipment displays, a 1Q-X 
booth t and other activities for 
the XYLs. Tatk-in on .52, ,28/.B8 t 
and 147.84/.24. For information 
and tickets, write Norman Gib* 
bins WBflSZI, 692 North Ted, 
Marshall MO 65340. 

MACKS INN ID 
JUL 27 29 

WIMU (Wyoming, Idaho, Mon- 
tana, and Utah) will hold its 47th 
annual hamfest on July 27-29 T 
1979, at Macks lnn t Idaho, 
Festivities include 2-meter 
hunts, OSCAR demonstrations, 
ladies' crafts, and a repeater 
display. The pre-registration 
prize will be a Wilson Mark II 
handie-talkie complete with 
touchtone™, battery pack, and 
charger. The grand prize is your 



choice of an Icom IC-211 or a 
Kenwood TS-520. Saturday 
night special events include 
kids' movies and an adult 
dance. For further information, 
contact Dave Hunting WB7FGV, 
Box 662. Kemmerer WY 83101 , or 
call (307V677-9440, 

OKLAHOMA CITY OK 
JUL 27 29 

The Central Oklahoma Radio 
Amateurs will sponsor the 
Oklahoma State ARRL Conven- 
tion and "Ham Holiday 1 ' on July 
27-29 t 1979, at Lincoln Plaza, 
4445 Lincoln Blvd., Oklahoma 
City, Oklahoma. The program 
will include an ARRL forum and 
technical talks on 1-GHz 
techniques, fast-scan TV for 
radio amateurs, NBVM, and 
other subjects of current in- 
terest, In addition, a full pro* 
gram is scheduled for the 
ladies, Pre-registration will be 
$4.00 if received before July 20. 
After that date, it will be $5.00. 
A synthesized 800-channel 
VHF transceiver will be award- 
ed to encourage pre-registra- 
tion. The main award will be a 
TS-120V with power supply. 
Adequate rooms are available 
for commercial exhibitors and 
swappers. Mail your registra- 
tion to CORA t PO Box 14424, 
Oklahoma City OK 73113. 

Unlimited parking space is 
also available, 

MOOSE JAW 
SASKATCHEWAN CAN 
JUL 27-29 
The Moose Jaw Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 1979 
Hamfest (Particifest 79) on July 
27-29, 1979, at the Saskatche- 
wan Technical Institute, 600 
Saskatchewan St W., Moose 
Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada, 
Registration will be held on Fri- 
day evening with a full day of 
activities on Saturday culmi- 
nating in a banquet and dance. 
Most of the meetings and work* 
shops will be held on Sunday. 
There will also be a busy 
schedule for the XYLs. 

OLIVER BC CAN 
JUL 28-29 

The Okanagan International 
Hamfest will be held on July 
28-29, 1979, at Gallagher Lake 
KOA Kampslte, 8 miles north of 
Oliver, B.C., Canada. Registra- 
tion starts at 9:00 am Saturday, 
Activities start at 1:00 pm 
Saturday and continue until 
2:00 pm Sunday, Ladies may 
bring their hobbies and items 
for a white-elephant sale. 
Featured will be prizes, a flea 
market, bunny hunts, entertain- 
ment, a home-brew contest, 
and more. A potluck lunch will 
be served Sunday at noon. Call- 
in on 3800; .347.94, and .76 
simplex. For Information, write 

Continued on page 188 



168 



SUPEft 



RCA Cosmac Super Elf Computer S10S.95 



Compare features before you decide to boy My 
other computer There a no Other tomptftef on 
me market today thai Has all the desirable bene- 
fits of trie Super EJf tor so bTtie money Tr» Super 
Ell is a small single board computer that does 
many Hf things ft 15 an excellent computer lor 
tiwiflfl and tor learning programming with its 
machine language and yet A is easily eipanded 
*Sh additional memory. Tmy lane ASCII 
Keyboard!, v^eo character gen era Hon, elc. 

Trie Super Elf deludes a ROM monitor tor pro- 
gram fading, editing and execution with SJftGLE 
STEP tor prog rem debugging wficn 15 not in- 
cluded in others at me same price Wctri SINGLE 
STEP you can seethe microprocessor chip opera- 
ting with the wHpt Quasi address and data bus 
mpUys belore during and liter executing in- 
structions Also CPU mode and instruction cycle 
are decoded and displayed on eight LEO indicator 
(amps. 

An RCA 186 1 video grepiict chip allows you to 
conned to your own TV with an inei pen sure video 
modulator to do graphics and games There is a 
speaker lyilam included for writing your own 
music or using many music programs already 
written The speaker amplifier may also be used 
to drive relays for control purposes 

A 24 key HEX ktftaanJ includes 16 hex keys 
plus load, rt tei, run. trail, input, memory pra- 



ted, monitor select and single step Large, on 
board displays prowde output and optional high 
aaej lew address There s a 44 pin standard 
con nector for PC cards and a 50 pm connector lor 
the Quest Super Expansion Board Power supply 
and sockets lor ill it's are included 11 the price 
plus a detailed 127 pg instruction manual wtMtl 
now includes over 40. pes of software iffo. *v 
cludkng a series of lessc ns to neip get you started 
and a music program and graphics target game 

Remember, other computers only offer Super Eft 
features at additional cost or not at air Com pare 
belore you buy. Super 61 tit JIM. 85 High 
adtfretf option SB 95, low address option 
19 95 Custom Cabinet with drilled and labeled 
pieijgfass front panel £24.95. Mi Cad lattery 
Memory Saver Kit Si, 95. All kits and options 
also come completely assembled and tested 

Quettdafa a 12 page monthly software publica- 
tion for 1802 computer users is available by sub- 
scription tor Si 2 GO pet year 



Attention Elf Owners 

ffew product! In hardware and to ft wire 
coming toon. 



Tiny Basic cassette $tO.Q0 on ROM $38 00 
original Ot kit board Si 4 95 



Super Expansion Board with Cassette Interlace $89.95 



This is truly an astounding value 1 This board has 
been designed to allow you lo decide now you 
want rt optioned The Super Eipimlon Board 
comes with 4K of low power RAM fully address 
able anywhere in 64K with buiIMn memory p ro- 
le ct and a cassette interface Provisions have 
been made for all other options on toe same 
board and it tils neatly mio the hardwood cabinel 
alongside the Super Ell The board includes slots 
for up to 6K of EPftOM (27&9, 2758. 2718 or Tl 
2716] and islulty socketed. EPROM can be used 
tor the monlto r and Tin y Basic or ol he r p urpose s . 

A IK Super ROM Monitor $19.95 Is available as 
an on board option In 2708 EPROM which has 
been preprogrammed with a program loader, 1 ' 
editor and error checking multi file cassette 
read write Software (relocatlble cassette Bit) 
another exclusive from Quest It includes register 
save and readout block move capability and 
video graphics dnver with blinking cursor Break 
points can be used with i he register save feature 
to isolate pro g ram bugs Quickly, then Id I low wtth 
single step The Super Monitor is written with 
subroutines all owing users to take advantage of 
monitor functions simply by calling them up 



improvements and revisions are easily done with 
the monitor If you have the Super Expansion 
Board and Super Monitor the monitor is up and 
running at the push of a button 

Other on board options include Parallel Input 
and Output Ports with lull handshake T^y 
allow easy ca nnection of an ASCI I keyboard to the 
input port. HS 232 and 20 nu Current loop for 
teletype or other device are on board and if you 
need more memory there are two S-1 UO slats for 
static RAM or video boards. A GodbouE 8K RAM 
board is available for SI 35,00. Also a 1K Super 
Monitor version 2 with video driver for lull capa- 
bility display with Tiny Basic and a video interface 
board Parallel 1/0 Ports $9.85, RS 232 04.50. 
TTY 2D ma IF SI. 95, S 100 54 50 a SO pin 
connector set with ribbon cable is available at 
$12 50 tor easy connection between the Super 
Elf and the Super Expansion Board. 

The Power Supply Ktl lor the Super Expansion 
Board Is a 5 amp supply with multiple positive 
and negative voltages S29.95. Add £4.00 for 
shipping. Prepunched Irame $5.00. Case 
510 00 Add $1 .50 for shipping. 



Auto Clock Kit $15.95 

DC dock w«h 4- 5<T displays Uses National 
MA-1Q12 module wih itarm option Indudes 
fcght dtnmef , crystal hmebase PC boards Fully 
regutaed comp instructs Add S3 95 for beau- 
tiful dark gray case. Best value anywhere 



RCA Cosmac VIP Kit $229.00 

Video computer »nh games and graphics 
Fuiy assem and tan 1241.00 



Hoi a Chtap Clock KII $14.95 

Incudes everything except case 2 PC boards 
6-50* LED Displays 5314 dock chip, trans- 
form er ai components and fu§ iftsf ructions 
Orange displays aho avail. Stat fct wtM 
atsftayi Red only 121.95 Case 111 75 



§0 Hi Crystal Time Base Kit $4.40 

Converts digital clocks from AC line frequency 
lo crystal time base Outstanding accuracy Kit 
m dudes PC board. IC crystal. resistor*, ca- 
pacitors and inrnmei 



Digital Temperature Meter Kit 

Indoor and outdoor. Switches back and forth 
Beautiful 50' LED readouts. Nothing like rt 
available . Needs no additional parts for com- 
plete, fun operation. Will measure - 100 to 
-200 F. tenths ol a degree air or liquid 
Very accurate. $39.95 

Beauti f ul woodgrain case w, bezel ft t 75 



NiCad Battery Frier/Charger Kit 

Opens snorted cells thai wo n't hold a charge 
and then charges them up, all n one kit #1uil 
parts and instructions. 17.25 



PROM Eraser W* erase 25 PflOMs m 
15 m fiutes Ultra wow, assembled 134.50 



Rockwell AIM 65 Computer 

6502 based single board nth tul ASCII keyboard 
and 20 column thermal printer 20 char, al- 
phanumeric d splay, ROM mentor, fuuy expand- 
able $375 QO 4K version S45O.00 4K Assem- 
bler S8S 00 8* Basic Interpreter S10OO0 
P^ntr supply assembled in case $60.00. 



T ERMS $5 00 mm DfderUS Funds Calil residents add rj-vtai 
Ban turner icard and Master Charge accepted 
Shipping charges will be added on charge cards 



Same day a hip men I. Firsl line parts only 
Factory tested. Guaranteed money back 
Quality IC's and other components at fac- 
tory prices 

INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 



P.O. Boi 4430M Santa Clara, CA 95064 

k For will call only: (4M) 9W IMi 
2322 Walsh Ave. 



r*aw 



ttl 




7«JIH 

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2N23E9 30 

7NB904A 3D 

2NS*ITA 2S 

?N305J 40 

7N3S3B 75 

?na&ia .» 

7N3904 IN 

ZSDOTf II 

ZU30S5 8» 

2^400' 25 

2H4401 75. 

?*l44nj 20 

T4P31 .60 

MP3W 100 

D CmKfen R3232 

MZ5P 2.95 

EKK55 395 

i**r I 50 
RSaSCMRpUaSdE.U 

OOP i so 

041 V US 

J»15| 3 10 



EN 300 mi 

12 Vbi 3M mi Imilbnm 

IZ SV a «00 rn* 

13V £91 flu mill tfuy 

12V CTZtfrni wtf jii« 

74V CT 400 mi 

iflV '.2 imp -mcAia 

12V n jnp I 

04SFUV LE OS 

MAN1 CA !7D 

MAN3 CC I ft 

HAN7Z/74 CATCA 300 

DL704 Ct MO 

DLrflMlL/07H CA 3410 

Q1727/72H WCt SOO 

□LN;.'79I CA.CC ADO 

DL75B OC 6ffll 

fN0J5? CC 357 

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FNDH3J510 GC'CA MO 
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DSfi *lusrBH»cil 
OG T FHunrwcnrri 
5 diglr M jiin nupay 
NSNBfl 4 Add dnp4q . 
7570 r.Uirri phptanM 

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COMPUTER fiMDl (JtFl 

■&K- (ttm ?oov 

2O0D mW 45V 

sod 91V 

5SM 25V 

5400 40V 

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flTQC MY 

7700 50V 

booo v.v 

'Mm 2DV 

12KO 30V 

tfOG 25V 

KWE 15V 



76000 

:2O0£D 



in too 



Multi- volt Computer Power Supply 

Bv Samp, z i8v samp. 5v 1 5 amp. -5v 
.Samp, T^ Samp. - 12 opltoti i5v, -12v 
are regulated *w$29 95 Kff win puncfied ttame 
S34 95 Woodgra-n caw S W 00 



Video Modulator Kit $8.95 

Convert yo ur TV sal tnio a rugn qualify monitor 
without affectirtg normal usage Complete kit 
with ful tfistruetions 



2.5 MHz Frequency Counter Kit 

Compile krt less case S37 . SO 

30 MHz Frequency Counter Kit 

Compile lot kess case J4T.7& 

Prescater kt to 350 MH2 SI 9 .95 



Stopwatch Kit S26 95 

Full six dig rf battery operated. 2-5 voUs 
3 .27&S WHi crystal accuracy. Times to 59 
rniit., 59 sec.. 991/1 00 -see. Times std ., spin 
anc? Taylor. 7205 cfiip, ail compqnefits minus 
case Fyfl mstroctjons. 



Hickok 3v 2 Digit LCD Multimeter 

Batl AC oper 1mv-l000v. 5 range*. 5% 
accur. Resistance 6 io* po*er ranges i 
obm-20M ohm OC cut. .01 to lOQma Hand 
fieid. h~ LCD cteptays. auto zero, polarity, over- 
rarioe S74.9S 



79 IC Update Master Manual $35« 

Complete (C on a selector, 2500 pg master ref- 
erence puttie Over 50,000 cross references. Free 
update service through 1979 Domestic postage 
S3 SO Foreign S5.00. t97S l€ Master doseout 
S1950 



S-100 Computer Boards 

m Static fUM K4 Gw&KHft $T35 00 

16K Static RAM Kit 265 00 

24K Slate RAM Ka 423 00 

32K Dynamic RAM Kit 310 00 

64K Dynamic RAM Kl 470 00 

8K.16K Eprom Hi (less PflOMS) SI9.ea 

VMtO rMBfbce Ki $139.M 
Motherboard S3S. extender Board SI W 



FREE: Send for your copy of our NEW 1979 
DUF.ST CATALOG Include 26 1- stamp. 



^ Reacrtr Service— s#*pag« f95 



169 



Uncompromising performance. 

Incredible price. 

A professional 3% digit DMM Kit for less than *70. 




Z9.99 



MODEl 2000 



sabtronics Gg 



FUNCTION 



wmn tc volt 



RANGE 



lOOnV 1GV 
1C,*A 1mA 
H' 10KQ 



tOQoiA 



■ 




Incredible? True! Professionals and hobbyists alike are 
believers in this Sabtronics 2000, the only portable /bench 
DMM which offers such uncompromising performance 
at the astonishingly low price of $69.95. 

Uncompromising performance you'd expect only from 
a specialist in digital technology such as Sabtronics: 
Basic DCV accuracy of 0.1% ± 1 digit; 5 functions giving 
28 ranges; readings to ± 1999 with 100% overrange; 
overrange indication; input overload protection; 
automatic polarity; and automatic zeroing. 

The low price of $69.95? Simple; The Model 2000 is all 
solid-state, incorporating a single LSI circuit and high- 
quality components. You assemble it yourself, using our 
clear, easy-to-follow, step-by-step assembly manual. 
Kit is complete, including a high-impact case. 

Now you too can have it! A professional-quality, 3V4 digit 
Sabtronics Model 2000 DMM kit for only $69.95. If you 
don't have one in your lab, use the coupon below to 
order NOW. 

BRIEF SPECIFICATIONS; 

DC volts in 5 ranges; 100 /iV to 1 kV - AC volts in 5 ranges: 

100 /iV to 1 kV * DC current in 6 ranges; 100 nA to 2 A 

* AC current in 6 ranges: 100 nA to 2 A - Resistance: 
0.1 B to 20 MQ in 6 ranges * AC frequency response: 40 
Hz to 50 kHz - Display: 0.36" (9,1 mm) 7-segment LED 

• Input impedance: 10 MQ • Size: 8" W x 6,5" Dx3"H 
(203 x 165 x 76 mm) • Power requirement: 4 "C" cells 
(not included). 

GUARANTEE: 

Examine the 2000 DMM kit for 10 days. If not completely 
satisfied, return unassembled for full refund of purchase 
price, (Less shipping and handling) 

Use your Master Charge or Visa. 

To order by phone call: (214) 783-0994 



i**S27 





INTERNATIONAL INC 
13426 Floyd Circle aDallas.Texas 75243 




Made In U.S.A. 



To; Sabtronics International, Inc. 
1342S Floyd Circle, Dallas, TX 75243 



1 
I 



Please send me. 



Sabtronics Model 2000 DMM kit(s) 



at «u?*93 eacn* *.,#.*.,..*»*.._._,,, 

Shipping and handling, $5.00 per unit* 
Texas Residents Add Sales Tax 

TOTAL enclosed 

Name 



$ 

$. 
$. 



S 



Street 



City, 



State. 



.Zip. 



*USA only. Canada $6,50* All other countries, $10 00 (surface mall) 



170 




North 32nd Street/Unit -1 Phoenix, Arizona 85008 (602) 956-9423 

We accept checks, Master Charge, and Visa 

Prices subject to change without notice 






R.F. CONNECTORS 

UG-1095A/U $399 

UG-58/U 3,29 

UG-30C/U 3,00 

UG27C/U 3.50 

PL-259 .50 

S0239 .43 

UG-175 .36 

PL-258 2.99 

UG-106 .69 

UG-177 .69 

UG^274/U 3.27 

UG-447/U 1.50 

UG 492 3.69 

UG-306/U 3.00 

UG-646/U 3,29 

UG-26QB/U 1,59 

UG-1094/U .90 

UG-701/U 3,00 

UG-212C/U 3.00 

TUBES 

3-5002 $90.00 

572B/T16QL 34.00 

6146 5.09 

6146A 5,99 

6146W 7.95 

811 A 12.95 

81 1 9.95 

4CX250B 29.95 

4CX250R 32.95 

6KD6 4.99 

6LF6 4.99 

6LQ6/6J E6 6.25 

8950 6.65 

2E26 6,00 

3B28 5.00 

4X1 50A 15.00 

6360/A 7.95 

6939 5.95 

7289/2C39 4,95 

8072 45.00 

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l2/$.89or 
100/S4.00 

TORIDAL CORES 



T-37-6 

25/4.00, 
100MO.OO 

1N914/1N4148 

30/$ 1,00 or 
120/83.00 



6/1,00 
50/6.00 



R.F. TRANSISTORS 



2N2857 

2N2857JAN 

2N2947 

2N3375 

2N3553 

2N3818 

2N3866 

2N3866JAN 

2N2866JANTX 

2N3925 

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2 N 5590 

2N5591 

2N6080 

2N6081 

2 N 6082 

2N6083 

2N6084 

2N6095 

2N6097 

MRF502 

MRF8004 

SS2548 

40280 

40281 

40282 



$1.80 

2.45 

17.00 

7.00 

1.80 

6.00 

1.09 

2.70 

4.43 

6.00 

2.00 

26.25 

4.70 

1.70 

1.09 

2.57 

3,50 

3.90 

1.55 

.59 

4.60 

5.00 

6.30 

10.35 

5,45 

8.80 

10.75 

12.00 

13.20 

10.35 

19.35 

.69 

■ ■ o 

.75 

3.50 

10.90 

11.90 



TRIMMERS 5-80 pf 

45* each or 10/3.50 
or 100/25.00 

CHOKE [U252] 2 5mh 

150ma 30M Hz 

2/$ 1.00 

TRIMMER CAPS 

small enough to 
fit In your watch 
3.5-11 pf 75c each 

or 10/S6.00 

PISTON CAPS 12 i0pf 

75<£ each or 10/$5.50 



F.E.T.'s 

MPF4391 
MPF112 

MPF102 

40673 

3N128 

2N5248 

MPF131 

2N4303 

2N3958 

MFE2000 

MFE2001 

MFE2008 

MFE2009 

MFE30Q2 

MMF-5 

MFE120 

2N3436 

2N4416 

MFE131 



$ .75 

.69 

.43 

1.39 

1.35 

.60 

.60 

,45 

2.95 

.90 

.99 

4.20 

4.80 

3.35 

5.00 

1.00 

2,25 

1.00 

1.05 



MICROWAVE 

1N21D 

1N21C 

1N21WE 

1N23B 

1N23C 

1N23CR 

1N23E 

1N23F 

1 N23WE 

1N25 

1N121WE 

1N286 

1IN416E 

1M446 

1 N3655A 

1N5153 

1N5711 



or 10/ 6.50 
or 10/ 5.50 
or 10/ 3.50 
or 10/10,00 
or 10/10.00 
or 10/ 4.50 
or 10/ 5.00 
or 10/ 3.50 
each 

or 10/ 8,00 
or 10/ 8.00 
or 10/36.00 
or 10/39,00 
each 
each 
or 10/ 8.50 

each 

each 
each 



DIODES 

$ 1.40 

1.05 
2.00 
1.05 
1.05 
2.00 
2.00 
4.10 
2.10 
3.03 
4.00 
5.00 
5.00 
8.00 
4.00 
15.00 
1.20 



ADDITIONAL R.F. 
TRANSISTORS 

40894 S 2.50 

MRF454/568BLYCF 17.10 

LM566V VCO/FUNC- 
TION GENERATOR 

$.99 each 

LM340T-5 & LM340T 
-12 75$ each 



SEMTECH MINISTIC 

high voltage rectifiers SFMS 

20K20.000PIV 

20ma $1.99each 

15 OOP IV 1-5 AMPS 
RECTIFIERS io/$t 50 



MC4024P & 
MC4044P 



$3,25 each 



HEP 170 2.5 Amps 

1000PIV10/S2. 00 or 100^14,50 

POTTER & BRUM- 
FIELD 12VDC RELAYS 

4PDT 3 Amps $2.95 

SPOT 25 Amps $5.95 

2PDT 3 Amps $1-99 

4PDT 25 Amps $6.99 

BRIDGES 24 AMPS 

500PIV $2.99each 

4CX2S0B/R SOCKETS 
AND CHIMNEYS NEW 

$14.95 per set (1 socket, 1 
chimney} 



BfiW COILS 




1206T 


$3.99 


2006T 


$7.99 



FAIRCHILD REGULA- 
TOR 76H05KC $6.99 each 



TUBES 

6146B 



S6.50 



MINIMUM ORDER $5.00 

Minimum Shipping $1. In* 
surance 35c per $100. COD 
charges 85qs to street address 
only! We prefer street ad- 
dress as we ship UPS and P.O. 
Box #*s take up to 50% longer 
to deliver. We accept VISA or 
Mastercharge. Please list 
complete card number and 
expiration date. Allow 10% 
extra for shipping of heavy 
items. We reserve the right to 
change prices without notice. 
All items listed are subject to 
prior sale. Some items listed 
are in small quantities. 



P* Reader Service— see pag$ 195 



171 



FREQUENCY COUNTER KIT 



Cl-51 *.^.iEiicrCpq»Ttm 




-•j 



Outstanding Performance 



CT-50 



lsimK jbannljw 



Incredible Price 



Tne CT-50 i% a versatile and precision frequency counter whjch wilj measure 

frequences to 60 rnH* and up to 600 mHz with Ihe CT 600 option Large Scale stability *? 5 

Integration CMOS Circuitry and solid state display technology ha^n enabled this counler to > uEttbonHtet 

malch performance found in units selling tor over three times as much Low powt^r |r " JlJt e|S, C j n 

consumption (typically 300-4QO rnai makes the CT 50 ideal lor porrable battery operation u^rtoid SOV* 

features ot the CT-50 include large B Cligil LED display RF shielded all metal case easy 5en5.Nv.ty less 

pushbutton operation automatic decimal point Mly socketed IC chips and input protection p maw t to vw 

to 50 volts lo insure against accidental burnout or overload Ana the best feature ot all is the e h . a % 

easy assembly Clear step by step instructions guide you to a finished unit you can rely on res i 3 ^ 
Order your today 1 

T - Winter trl $t9 4* - <ho* siatMiJer 
' >Qy» T 60 wtN^ count*' *»red and! tested 1 SS iS _. . pi ot* gener a) purpose probe 

-00 600 mH/ Option adk2 29 95 hP ^ ^otw norvload.r 



SPECIFICATIONS: 

Fre<|ueftcy range 6 Hf to 65 *t.h/ &DO mt« * <?IK' 

Resolution 10 H3 31 sec gale 1 Hi in 1 mh y.ii*- 
RtjdOuui 6 digM 4 high LED direct readout ir> mH/ 

r.ti.y acJ|*jbtafi«L" to ti ppni 
■^ 1 ,4 1 « ■ 1 1 1 r i : U ppm over to to 4ij i temperature 

compensated 
Input QNC 1 rrtegohm 2(*pidJieci BO ohm wtJi CT^BPi 
Overteid £0vai rnwuriiurri ail modes 

Sennliutly «ess ihrtf 25 ^« 10 65 »t»h/ ■;• mv tn tiQO 

mH/ 
•>r I to VA(, 5 rt^iu or 1 ? vDC 1 4rm ma 

2 »i.gnquaitiy afun . - 3 itrt 

hCli 13 ijfiti',1. jii sisturted 



S14 9S 
I2*i5 
1S9S 




CAR 
CLOCK 

The UN-KIT, only 
5 solder connections 

Here s. a super looking rugged and accurate auio 
clock, whicn it a snap to build and install Clock 
movement 1$ completely assem Died— you only solder 
3 wires and 2 switches, takes aboul 15 mlnutesl 
Display is brighl green witti automate brightness 
control photocell -assures you ot a highly readable 
display day or nrghl Comes in a satin linrsh an- 
odized aluminum cam which can be a era chert 5 
different ways using 2 sided tape Choice ot silver. 
Black or gold case (specify! 

DC -3 Ml 12 hour formal $22.95 

DC -3 w >red and letted 529 95 

1 10V AC adapter $5.95 



OP-AMP SPECIAL 



741 mini dip 

Bi-FET mini dtp, Wl type 



12/S3 00 
I0/S2 00 




Under dash 
car clock 

1 2 24 hour clock in a beau- 
Mui plastic case features 6 

(umboREDLEDSfughaccuracyOmin mo ) easy 3 
wire hookup, display blanks with ignition and Super 
instructions Optional dimmer automatically adjusts 
display to ambient I'&hi >evei 
DC-i i clock with mrg bracket $27.95 

DfVM dimmer adapter 3.50 



PRESCALER 

Extend the range ol your 

counter lo 600 mHz Works 

with any counter Includes 2 

transistor pre-amp to give super sens, typically 20 

mv at ISO mH* Specify f 10 or * 100 rati© 

PS- 1 S 600 mH* prescaier $59 95 

PS-1 9K 600 mHz o*escate* kit 49 95 




VIDEO TERMINAL 

A completely self-contained, stand alone video ter- 
minal card Requires only an ASCII keyboard and TV 
set to become a complete terminal unit Two units 
available, common features are: single 5V supply, 
XTAL controlled sync and baud rates (to 9600), 
complete computer and keyboard control of cursor 
Parity error control and display- Accepts and gener- 
ates serial ASCII plus parallel keyboard input The 
3216 is 32 Char by 16 Fines. 2 pages with memory 
dump feature. The 6416 is 64 char, by 16 lines, with 
scrolling, upper and lower case (optional) and has 
RS'232 and 20m* loop interfaces on board Kirs 
include sockets and complete documentation 
RE 32 1 6. terminal card 1 1 4 9 . 1 S 

RE 64 1 6, terminal card 1 19.95 

Lower Case option 6416 only 13,95 

Power Supply Kit 14.95 

Video RF Modulator. VD-i Mi 

Assembled tested units, add 60 .00 



CALENDAR ALARM CLOCK 

The clock tnals got il all 6-5" LEOs. 12 24 hour. 

snoo/e 24 hour alarm, 4 year calendar, bailery 

backup, and lots more The super 7001 chip rs used 

Size 5x4x2 inches 

Complete kit, less case (not available) 

DOS 134.95 



30 Watt 2 mtr PWR AMP 

Simple Class C power amp features 6 times po«er 
ga*n t Win tor Scot. 2 m for 15 out, 4 W in Iqf 30 cut 
Ma.* output of 35 W incredrble value Complete with 
alt parts, less case and T-R reiary 
PA-1 30 W pwr amp kit S22-9S 

tr-t RF sensed T-R relay kit 6 95 



Ramsey's famous MINI-KITS 




FM WIRELESS MIKE KIT 

Transmits up to 300' 

to any FM broadcast 

radro, uses any type of 

mike Runs on 3 to 9V 

Type RM-2 has added san- 

silive mike preamp slag* 

FM-l kit 42 95 FM-2MS4.9S 



COLOR ORGAN/MUSIC LIGHTS 

See musjc come eiwai 3 deferent 
lights flicker Miih music One lighi 
lor lows, one tor tne mid -range and 
one for the highs Each channel 
individually ad|u stable end drives 
upfo300W Great ro« parties hand 
music nite clubs and more 

Complete M ML- 1 17 95 



LEO BLINKY KIT 

A great atteniion getter wh«ch after 

natety Hashes 2 jumbo LEO* Uw 

lor name badges buttons warning 

panel i^nts anything' Runs on 3 to 

1$*DHs 

Complete M BL i S2 9S 




VIDEO MODULATOR KIT 

Convert! any TV to video monitot 
Super staple. I unable over ch 4-6 
Runs on 5- 15V accepts $td video 
Sfpnal Best unit on the martiet' 
Complete k 1 1 VD- 1 S* 95 



TONE DECODER 

A ccjmplole 
tone decoder on 
a single PC board 
features 400-S000 
Hz adiustable range via 
20 lurn pql. voltage regutahan 567 
IC UseM tor touch tone decoding 
tone tjurst detection fSK.etc Can 
also be used as a siabie tone en- 
coder Runs on S to \2 vons 
Como*elefcit Tt>i 95-95 

WHISPER LIGHT KIT 

An iriiefesMTg nt small mm e p<c lis 
up sounds an*} converts Ihem lo 
i*ght The louder ine sound the 
brighter the light Complete** self- 
contained includes mifce tuns on 
1 10V AC controls up to 300 wafts 
ompleteM WL-1 U 95 





ramsFjij alsslrniiBs 

BOX 4072, ROCHESTER, N.Y. 14610 



SUPER SLEUTH 

A super sensitive am 
plllier AhiCh vrili p»0 
up a pin drop at i b leer 
Great for moniiurmg baby s room or 
as general purpose amplifiei Pull 2 
W rms Qui put. runs on B lo t S volts, 
uses €-45 ohm spctikor 
Compile kii, BN-9 >5-»S 

POWER SUPPLY KIT 

Complete triple regu- 
la led power supply pro- 
vides variable 6 To 1 1 
volts at 200 ma and + 5V il l 
Amp Excellent load regulation 
good filtering and small s/je Less 
translormers requires 6 3V ^ 1 A 
and 24 vCT 
Complete kit P&3LT II 95 



SIREN KIT 

Produces upward and downward 
wa f i c f»a« a cierrsaic ot ■ poice aire« 
!>W peak audio output runt oo 3- 15 
vents uses 3-45 ohm tpeafc*t 
CompjetefciL SM-3 l^fl 



PHONE ORDERS CALL 
(716)271-6487 



FM MINI MIKE KIT 

A super nigh ■performance FM 
wireless mike M 1 Tranimiis a stable 
signal up lo 300 yards with excep- 
tional audio quality by means ol its 
built m electrer mike Kii includes 
case. mike, on -oft swilch, antenna, 
baltery and super instructions This 
is ihe lines* unit available 
FM-3 kit *12.95 

FJvl-3 wired incl lasled 1 6.9S 





CLOCK KITS 



our Seat Seller 
your Bett Deal 



Try your hand at building the finest looking 
clock on the market its saim finish anodtoed 
aluminum case looks great anywhere, while six .4" 
LED digits pro tide, a highly readable display Tins «s a 
complete M no extras needed, and d only takes 1-2 
hours to assemble Your choice ot case colors 
silver gokj bronze, black, blue (specify) 
Clock kit \ 2/24 hour, DCS 52 2 95 

Clock with 10 mm ID timer, \2 24 hour 

DC-10 27,»S 

Alarm clock. 1 2 hour only DC-fl M.9S 

12V DC car clock DC-7 27.95 

For wired and tested clocks add 510 QC id kit price 



Hard to find PARTS 



LINEAR ICt 






REGULATORS 


301 


S 


?8MG 


12* 




' so 


r» 


3t0 




125 


309* 


M0-e 




T5 


TWfo 


554 




4^ 


ntos 


3M 




ss 


?90S 


50Q 




t ts 


— 


bb ? 




1 2S 


'■■ 


i*se 




'- 




1901 




w 


rn id 


CMOS iC% 






MfOU 


401 1 






44 


1 




IS 


; '•- 






1 &£ 


. 


4 .4 - 




40 


.■'4'filjTI 


• 




1 25 


SPECIAL tCl 






1 ?h 


• ■ 


TRANSISTORS 






-y\ i ' - 


ZN39CJ4 \t\« 


■ 


t 00 


L'.| | 


2M39CH lypa 


to 


I 00 


■14 


NPN 3(W Pwr 


3 






PUP J0W Pwi 


3 


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fOQi 


2'Ri-K) 




so 


40*f9 N 


OJt 2Ni?M6 r^pe 


y 


?oo 


■ 


F£T MPFlO?<»0e 


j 


2tKi 


LED* 


UHF ?N^l^i T pe 


3 


>QQ 


.■' : 


WW ?3I RF 




M 95 


( i ^ , i *+ .j 


SOCKETS 








1 p"" 


10 


7 00 




14 pti 


ID 2 




ifeprfi 


10 


; x 


tt-P-^i«4 


?* p<ri 


■i 


s 90 


FERRITI Q£APS 




4 200 


iftjilri nfo t^j- 


40 p*n 


3 


J>W 


■ : < 



TERMS batisljd ,.n ^M«tMnt>*«<t o* n 
rel Linden COO £dd$1 bO Mjniffluir. oide^ 
SSOb Oid^rsui^dcsrS'lOTi- -dd 

_ *d« posta yu insurance handikna Dv&i 

«tas Add "■' NY res»di w 



172 



i^RS 



amironics,mc. 



SSB TRANSMITTING 
CONVERTERS 



^■Hie 



OSCAR 




FEATURES: 

• Lfnear Converter for SSB r CW, FM, etc* 

• A Fraction of the price of other units 
*2W p,e,p, output with 1 MW of drive 

• Use low power rap on exciter or attenuator pad 

• Easy to align with built-in test points 



Frequency Schemes Available: 

MODEL INPUT(MHz) OUTPUT(MHz) 

28-30 50-52 

28*30 220-222 

28-30 222-224 

2 8-30 144-146 

2 8-2 9 14 5-1 46 

26-26 144-146 



XV2-1 
XV2-2 
XV2-3 
XV2-4 
XV2-5 
XV2-6 



ONiY 559.95.' 



VHF Linear PA's 



• Use as Un«or or Oatt C PA*s • For XV-2 Xmrg 
Converters, T50 Exciters, or any 2W Exciter 




LPA 2-T5 Kir $59.95 

• 15W out (linear) or 20W (doss C) • Solid State 

T/R Switching • Models for 6M f 2M, cm- 220 MHz 







LPA 2-45 Kit S109.95 

• 45W out (linear) or 50W (cfais C) 

• Models for 6M or 2M 
LPA 8-45 Kit $89.95 
For2M, ©-T0W in, 4^V out 



T80 UHF POWER AMP 



Broadband PA 



No Tuning Required •Class C PA 

•430-470 MHz 
•13-l5WOut 
•200 mW Drive 

Model T80-450 

$79.95 
Wired & fested 




tfrjff f w frfrrrrrr 



HEADQUARTERS 



VHF RECEIVING 
CONVERTERS 



* 



Quality VHF A UHF Kits 
At Affordable Prices 



LET YOU RECEIVE OSCAR AND 
EXCITING SIGNALS ON YOUR 
ENT HF RECEIVER! 



OTHER 
PRES- 




MODEL 



■^^^MF^^H 



C2S 

C50 

C144 

C145 

C146 

C110 

C220 

C222 

Special 



RF RANGE |~F RANGE 

28-32MH* 
50-52 
144- 146 
145- 147 
146-148 
Aircraft 
220-222 
222-224 



144- 148MHz 

28-30 

28-30 

28-30 

28-30 

26-30 

28-30 

28-30 



Inquire About Other Ranges 

ONLY $34.95 



UHF RECEIVING 
CONVERTERS 




MODEL 
C432-2 
C432-4 
C432-5 
C432-7 
C432-9 
Special 



RF RANGE L'_F_R A NGE 

432-434 

432-436 

435-437 

427*25 

439.25 



28-3QMHz 
144-146 
28-30 
61.25 
61 .25 



Inquire About Other Ranges 

ONLY $34,95 



A9 Extruded Alum Case with BNC's for 
above Converter* (Optional) ... $12.95 



VHF&UHF FM RECEIVERS 



• NEW GENERATION RECEIVERS 

*MORE SENSITIVE *MORE SELECTIVE (70 or 100 dB) 

* COMMERCIAL GRADE DESIGN 

*EASY TO ALIGN WITH BUILT-IN TEST CKTS 

♦ LOWER OVERALL COST THAN EVER BEFORE 




R70 6-channel VHF Receiver Kit for 2M, 6M f 1QM, 
220 MHz, or eom'f bonds. . ,,,.».**„, $69.95 
Optional xtaJ filter for lOOdBqdj chqn 10.00 




R90 UHF Receiver Kit for any 2 MHz segment of 
380-520 MHz band .,... $89.95 



FAMOUS HAMTRONICS PREAMP5 
let you hear the weak ones! 



Great for OSCAR f SSB, FM, ATV, Over 10,000 in 
use throughout the world on all types of receivers. 



P9 Kit $12.95 

P14 Wired $24*95 




Specify Band When Ordering 



• Deluxe vhf model for applications where space 
permits • 1-1/2 j* 3 n •Models avail to cov«r any 
4 MHz band in the 26-230 MHz range »12 Vdc 

• 2 stages •Ideal for OSCAR «20 db gain 

• Diode transient protection •Easily tunable 




PS Kit $10.95 

P16 Wired $21.95 

Specify Band 



• Miniature vhf model for tight spaces - size only 
1/2x2-3^8 •Models avail to caver any 4 MHz 
band in the range 20-230 MHz *20db gain «12V 



^ 



P15 Kit $18.95 
P35 Wired $34.95 



• Covers any 6 MHz band in 
UHF range of 360-520 MH* 

• 20 dB gain *2 stagel •low noise 




NEW FM/CW EXCITER KITS 



BUILD UP YOUR OWN GEAR FOR MODULAR 
STATIONS, REPEATERS, & CONTROL LINKS 
• Rated for Continuous Duty • Professional 
Sounding Audio • Built-in Testing Aids 




T50 Six Channel, 2W Exciter for 2M, 6M, or 220 
MHz (Specify bond) S49.95 

T50U Six Charmer , 1W Exciter for 430-450 MHz 
uhf operation ,...,.,.......«..... $49. 95 



►Ask For Free Catalog + 



IT'S EASYTOORDERI 

CALL OR WRITE MIOW FOR IP«E 
CATALOG OR TO PLACE ORDERI 

PHONE 7T6-392-9430. (Electronic 

answering service eves & weekends) 

Ute credit cord, c,o.d, f check, m , o 
Add S2.00 shipping & handling. 



IN CANADA, order from Communication* Rus f 3680 
Core Vertu; St- Laurent, Quebec or phone 514-337- 
72 55 1 Add 38% to cover duty, tax, and exchange^ 



Note New Address and Phone No 



amironics, inc 



65A moul 



HILTON, NY 14468 



'Dealer Inquiries Invited - - 



i*^ Reader Service— see page 195 



173 



•**• * « ******* **•*••** ;Ii«7*i*I**»#* ••■♦*•••*•****••*••••*«••••••••♦••♦••••*•*«••*••*• • •••••,,, 



16K EPROM CARD-S 100 BUSS 



)••*• 



Y 





oun 

BEST 

SELLING 

KIT! 



USES 2708s! 

Thousands of personal and business systems around 
the world use this board with complete satisfaction. 
Puts 16K of software on line at ALL TIMES! Kit features 
a top quality soldermasked and silk-screened PC board 
and first run parts and sockets. All parts {except 2708s) 
are included. Any number of EPROM locations may be 
disabled to avoid any memory conflicts, Fully buffered 
and has WAIT STATE capabilities* 



OUR 450NS 2708'S 
ARE $895 EA. WITH 
PURCHASE OF KIT 



ASSEMBLED 

AND FULLY TESTED 

ADD $25 



8K LOW POWER RAM KIT-S 100 BUSS 

250 NS SALE! 

ADD $5 
FOR 

250NS! 



"N 







(450 NS RAMS!) 

Thousands of computer systems rely on this rugged, work 
horse, RAM board. Designed for error-free, NO HASSLE, 



* - 



16K STATIC RANI KIT-S 100 BUSS 



systems use. 

KIT FEATURES: 

1 Doubled sided PC Board with sofder 
mask and silk screen layout Gold 
piafed contact fingers 

2 AM sockets included 

3 Fully buffered on all address and data 
lines. 

4. Phantom is jumper selectable to pin 
67, 

5. FOUR 7805 regulators are provided 
_j/\ ^_ on card 



Blank PC Board w/Documentauon 

$2945 

Low Profile Socket Set 13.50 

Support IC's (TTL & Regulators) 

$9.75 

Bypass CAP*s (Disc & Tantalums! 

$1.50 



ASSEMBLED AND FULLY 
BURNED IN ADD $30 



J 



^N 





,)l II II Hill II I II I 
Hill II III 111 HI 



— r — r — y 



>•••*■ 



FULLY 

STATIC, AT 

DYNAMIC PRICES 



WHY THE 2114 RAH CHIP? 
We t*wl ih* 2i n w>M bsthe neni industry standard 
RAM chip fhka the 2102 was> This meim puce 
avaM ability and qualify will ail he good* Next the 
2HJ-SFUUV STATIO We feel 1hs Is the ONLY 
way lo go on ihe S-i00 Buu 1 We've all hoard me 
HORROR storm about some Dynamic Ram 
Boards having rroublf. 3 will 1 ! DMA and FLOPPY 
DISC DRIVES. Who needs Iheso kinds Of 
problem*? And lfnal|y r even among other 4K 
Static RAM s iheZn*" viands out 1 NoiaiMK sialic 
Rams ar« created equal 1 Some of the other 4K"s 
have clocked chip enable lirwrS and various liming 
window* jut! n critical as Dynamic R AM * Soma 
of our competitor's 16K boards use tnese ' tricky 
device* ButnoliiE"T»>e2lt4t$theONL¥togicai 
choice for a t row We- free slratghttorward ctaMQft 




KIT FEATURES 

i Addressable as four separaie 4K Stocks 

2 ON BOARD BANK SELECT circuitry 

fCromemco Standard 1 ! Alio** up to 512K on 

Mfiet 

3. Use* 2 114 (450lSrS) 4K Static Rams 

4 ON BOARD SELECTABLE WAIT STATES 

5 Double sided PC Board, witn SDlder mask and 
silk screened layout. Gold plated contact lingers 

6 AH address and data lines luiiy buffered 

7 Kit includes ALL parts and sockets 

8 PHANTOM is jumpered 10 PIN 67 

9 LOW POWER undec 2 amps TYPICAL (com Ihe 

*e voit euti 

10 Bland PC Board can be populated as any 
multipte o* 4K 



i *• 



BLANK PC BOARD W/DATA-S33 
LOW PROFILE SOCKET SET-$12 ASSEMBLED & TESTED-ADD $30 
SUPPORT IC"S & CAPS— $19.95 21 14 RAM'S-8 FOR S69.95 



COMPLEMENTARY POWER TRANSISTORS 



SILICON NPN AND PNP TO-220 CASE 
VCEO - 40V PD - 30 WATTS 

FOR AUDIO POWER AMPS. ETC 



TIP29 - NPN 
TIP30 - PNP 



YOUR CHOICE 

3 FOR $1 




16K DYNAMIC RAM CHIP 

iGK X 1 Bits t£Pm Package Same as Most ek 4 H6-4 250 NS access 4i0 
NS cycle time Our besl puce yet I mi hts state or the erf RAM 32K*nd&dK 
RAM boards using this chip are readily available These are new - 
guaranteed devices t>y a major mtu VERY LIMITED STOCK? 

8 FOR $89.95 



NOT ASSOCIATED 

WITH 
DIGITAL RESEARCH 

Of CALIFORNIA. 

THE SUPPLIERS OF 

CPM SOFTWARE. 



450 ns« 2708 EPROMS 

Now full speed! Prime new units from a major U.S. 
Mfg. 450 M.S. Access time, 1K x 8 Equiv. to 4-1702 
A f s in one package. 

$Q95 

PRICE CUT y 



$ 15.75 oa . 




NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR NEW! 

CAR CLOCK MODULE - #MA6008 

Original I y used by HVGA1N to indicate time and 

^ AAA channel on an expensive C.B Mint size, self 

O ^X y y contained module Not a Kit. Four digits plus 

^J each hashing indicator for seconds includes MM53&9 

and 3 56 MHZ crystal for super accurate time base. 
With hookup data 

MFGR's CLOSEOUT 

LIMITED QTY. 



INCLUDES CRYSTAL TIMEBASE1 
WORKS ON 12 VDC1 



EXPERIMENTER S HEATING PLATE 
Large Manufacturers Surplus 5%Xl0ftfn Made 
of 3/8 m. tempered glass with heating element 
laminated on back. Works off 120 VAC 
Protected by thermostat and two thermal fuses. 
Rated 120 Watts Use for any heating 
applications Perfect for heating ferric chloride 
to increase PC Board etching efficiency. Units 
are brand new, non-submersible. 

WHILE THEY LAST- $2.99 each 



Z-80 PROGRAMMING MANUAL 

By MOSTEK, or ZILOG. The most detailed explanation 
ever on the working of the Z-80 CPU CHIPS. At least 
one full page on each of the 158 Z-80 instructions. A 
MUST reference manual for any user of the Z-SO 300 
pages Just off the press. $12*95 



MALLORY COMPUTER 
GRADE CAPACITOR 

30.000 MFD 15WVDC 

Small 3x2 Inches 

$1,99 ea. 3 For $4.99 



New* REAL TIME 

Computer Clock Chip 

N.S. MM53l3.Faaiur&« 
BOTH 7 segment and 
BCD outputs. 28 Pin 
DIP. £4,95 wllh Dati 



GENERAL INSTRUMENT 
FULL WAVE BRIDGE 
4 AMP 600 P1V 

4 IN SQUARE i WITH LUQS 



C^ 



750 « 3 FOR S2 **-' 



THE COLOSSUS" 

FAERCHIID SUPER JUMBO LED READOUT 
A full 60 inch character The biggest readout we have 
ewer sold! Super efficient Compare at up to $2 95 each 
from others* YOUR CHOICE 

FHD 843 Common Anode t _ Q 



FND 850 Common Cathode 



ea (0 for $6.95) 



Digital Research Corporation 

(OF TEXAS) 

P.O. BOX 401247 GARLAND, TEXAS 75040 • (214) 271-2461 



■ i 

■ ■ 



• • • • 



* 
* 



* * • 

• * • 




* • * • * 

* • * * • 

* * • • * 



m + * * 

. . 4 , 

• • • * 



• ••• 






i * - » 

■ * • * 

V * • • 



* ■ * 



TERMS: Arid 30e posiage. we pay balance Ordor* under $1 5 ^u 7&e handling Nn 
CO D. We accept Visa, Ma si or Charge, and Am eric nn Bxptma cards, Tuwt Pes add 
5% Tax Foreign orders (eucepl Canada add 30% pih 90 Day Money Back 
Guarantee On nil items 



"s 



J. 



* * 



# * • 



«••*•«• 



• *#••••••* 






■ • • * 
# • • * 










NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR 




NEW/ 



CAR CLOCK MODULE - #MA6008 



$ 6 



99 



each 



SPECIAL OFFER: Two for $13 



INCLUDES CRYSTAL TIMEBASE! 
WORKS ON 12 VDC! 



Originally used by HYGAIN to indicate time and 
channel on an expensive C.B. Mini size, self 
contained module Not a Kit. Four digits plus 
flashing indicator for seconds. Includes MM5369 
and 3.58 MHZ crystal for super accurate time base. 
With hookup data. 

MFGRs CLOSEOUT 



■ ••i 



■« •< 



LIMITED QTY. 



NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR 



MILITARY TIME FORMAT! 



JUMBO CLOCK MODULE 




MA1008D 
BRAND NEW! 



$495 

REG. s 9.95 



ADD $1.95 FOR 
AC XFMR 



ZULU 

50% OFF SALE! 



PERFECT FOR USE 
WITH A TIMEBASE. 



FEATURES 

* FOUR JUMBO l k INCH LED DISPLAYS 

* 24 HR REAL TIME FORMAT 

* 24 HR ALARM SIGNAL OUTPUT 

* 50 OR 60 Hz OPERATION 

* LED BRIGHTNESS CONTROL 

* POWER FAILURE INDICATOR 

* SLEEP & SNOOZE TIMERS 

* DIRECT LED DRIVE (LOW RFI) 

* COMES WITH FULL DATA 

COMPARE AT UP TO TWICE 

OUR PRICE! 



MANUFACTURER'S CLOSEOUT! 



«*n 



- * i 



NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR 



SIX DIGIT ALARM CLOCK CHIP 

Nationals second generation clock chip. 
24 Pin Dip. Super easy to use. 

FEATURES: 

12 HOUR DISPLAY * 24 HOUR ALARM 
4 OR 6 DIGITS * ALARM TONE OUTPUT 
SNOOZE ALARM * EASY LED INTERFACE 
POWER FAILING. * BRIGHTNESS CONTROL 
AM/PM INDICATION * SINGLE POWER SUPPLY 
FAST AND SLOW SET * LOW POWER 

HOUSE # 

WE SUPPLY FULL DATA, SPECS. 



$2.49 each 



3 FOR $5.95 



HUGE 
SPECIAL 



MM5375AA 



PURCHASE! 



NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR 

JUMBO CLOCK MODULE 



MA1Q08A 
BRAND NEW 



m 



fm^'ms 



U Lf * Lf LJ 




*6 



95 







FB*TL*l£S 

• Fmin JUMBO '•« WtCM LEB chsplatc 
« t?«WHfJU fJUEfOAUAT 

• 24 MP A; ARM fjIQHAL OUTPUT 
- woHtew OPERATION 

• LEO BRIGHTNESS CONTROL 

• rn^fH HU'.IMf. INDICATOR 

• SLEEP A SNOOZE TIMERS 

• DIRECT LED DRIVE (LOW R* H 

• COMES WUH MfLi DATA 



ASSEMBLED! NOT A Kl I ' 



MANUFACTURERS ClOSEOI 



(AC XFMR tr&SJ 

COMPARE AT UP TO TWICE 
OUR PRICE! 



PERFECT FOR USE 
WITH A TIMEBASE 




MICRO-MINI TOGGLE SWITCH ♦ 

99<U """ "" """ 



SPOT. By RAYTHEON. 
MADE IN USA! WITH HDWR 



EACH 



6 FOR $5 






»• 



60 Hz CRYSTAL TIME BASE 
$4.95 (Compete KH) 

Uses MM5369 CMOS divider tC 
with high accuracy 3.579545 
MHZ Crystal Use with all MOS 
Clock Chips or Modules. Draws 
only 1 5 MA AH parts, data and 
PC Board included. 



FAIRCHILD PNP 

"SUPER TRANSISTOR" 

2N4402 TO-92 Plastic Silicon PNP 

Oliver, High Current VCEO-40 HFE- 
5010 150 at 150 MA FT-150MHZ A 
super "BEEFEO-UP" Version of the 
2N3906. 



8 FOR $1 



«»•• 



FET SALE 

2N4304 Brand New 

N Channel, Junction Fet. 

BVGO0-30V IDSS-15 MA Typ 

1500 uMHOS. TO-18 Plastic 

Case. Mfg, by Teledyne. 

6 FOR $1 



JUMBO IC ASSORTMENT 

AM new not rejects. BIG 
computer mlg, Surplus. Some 
standard marked, many house 
numbered. TTL DTL LINEAR 
All prime, 1st line 
50 for S1.S9 500 for Si 2.95 



MORE CLOCK CHIPS! 




MM5316 - 4 Digit W'Alarm An old reliable work horse chip — ****#0 

S1.99 ;:;;•} 

MK50380 - 4 Digit - Direct Drive on Readouts. Like FCM 7010 - ;;;••§ 

$1.99 -*••«# 

$2.95 



MK50250 - 6 Digits with Alarm. For multiplexed Led R.O, — 



Digital Research Corporation 

w (OF TEXAS) ■ 

P.O. BOX 401247 ■ GARLAND, TEXAS • (214)271-2461 



b * ■ -p ■ * 
» * * * • • 

• ••••■ 



»•*■*■.*■.*■« > • » 



• . - 
■ * » 

• # • 



* * * 



■ ■ ■ 



• * * 

• * • 



• • • • • 



* * * 






■••••• 

TERMS: Add 30C postage, we pay balance. Orders under $15 add .. ## ^, 
75C handling No C.Q.D. We accept Visa, MasterCharge ana **»••• 
American Express cards Ten Res add 5*fc Tax. Foreign orders *••••# 
(except Canada} add 20% P&H 90 Day Money Back Guarantee on !!I*JJ 
ail items "*•• 

a*********************************** * • w 



85 TON SURPLUS DEAL!!! 

170.000 pounds of new surplus electronics was too much for either Digital Research Corporation 
or Bullet Electronics to handle ALONE! So we pooled our resources and rolled a convoy of four 
eighteen wheelers into our new Texas warehouse, You may order any of the below items from 
either company along with any other items from our respective ads elsewhere in 73. However, 
please DO NOT order Bullet Kits from Digital Research, or vice-versa. 



TEMPERATURE CONTROLLED HEATING PLATE 







4>/.uu 




5%x10-= In, 120 VAC, 120 WATTS Made of 1/4 In tempered pJate glass with Ni-Chrome heating element laminated to 
back Element size is 4 , x 9f« Inches Double protected byTl KLIXQN Thermostat and two thermal fuses. Each also 
has neon ready light- 
Besides the obvious use as a bun warmer, food warmer, coffee warmer, glue warmer, etc., our tests show this plate to 
be an excellent warmer for ferric chloride solution used in etching PC Boards by hobbyists, Typically increases 
etching efficiency by 300% over room temperature. Non-Submersible 



CMOS PARTS BONANZA 




\ 



7IVH11 



V- 



- r ~* .> 



9 



v 

; J 



\ 






990 



EACH 



Complete Module: 2 x 1 3 /* In. 

Contains: MC145533DIGIT BCD COUNTER, MC14511 BCDto7 
segment decoder latch, CD4060 OSCILLATOR and RIPPLE 
COUNTER, CD4011 Nand gate. Also was square N.O. push 
button. 9V battery clip, SPOT Sub-Mini slide switch Plus misc 
resistor, caps, transistor. AM parts easily removed. Reg. Drst. List 
on WC14553 alone is over S4 each! 



FIBER POINT PENS 

Writes on almost anything. Water Soluble ink. 
Designed to write on plastic etc Black. Fine Tip 49G 
Value. . . tA 

SPECIAL: 6/$1 100/$14 



PUSH BUTTON SWITCH 

N.O. SPst. P,G. Mount, Same as used on CMOS 
Parts Bonanza at left. 



5 FOR $1 



4 BIT MICROPROCESSOR MODULE 




750 



AqWvw 



fflo 



(MODULE ONLY) 



3 FOR $2 



Originally custom designed for a large US Consumer Mfg. These were used as part 
of a weight loss program. Unit counts up to 25 bites with 24 flashes between bites to 
indicate chewing rate Has 2 Digit LED readouts, adjustable on board oscillator, 4 
Bit Microprocessor with PROM. Our experimentation shows this module has many 
applications for timing, pacing, etc. Also there are on board signals that can 
produce various beeping, warble and exotic tones. Some application data included. 
Complete units in case, as above: S2.49 each. 



74C903 CMOS: 



National Semiconductor New CMOS Part. Hex 
Inverting Buffer. Use for interface from PMOS to TTL 
or CMOS. Can Drive LED'S. 



6/$1 



ORDER FROM EITHER COMPANY: SEE TERMS OF SALE ON OUR RESPECTIVE ADS 



Digital Research Corpration 

(OF TEXAS) 
P.O. BOX 401247 • GARLAND. TEXAS 75040 • (214)271-2461 



BULLET ELECTRONICS 

P.O. BOX 401244E * GARLAND. TEXAS 75040 

{214)270-3553 



176 



BILLET ELECTBMICS po box401244E (214)278-3553 

GARLAND TEXAS 75040 



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soas? ttouw o .^t cmp »k»cj 7t ptn ap 

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FHDJM Cortjmm C^lfrafl* nwbjr 4" < 
FHDTTJ Qanftifln Camote n«<iJuJ 3" i 

f N0T1 Gemmon Catfoda r I Chaiactw 

Ma:Dhss FNQ7D 
IIP M PNP 3flW Vcao-naY IC*1A. Tab (hftjnl 
TQ-220 3/1.00 

MUffl UPH Gan Punww Slm*|r io 2H3V3* 

?<4UQZ »NP Compum*!* If. Jr+UOO 1M 00 



mi UNIVERSAL SOUND EFFECTS BOARD 

WVE KDU EVER *E3*jr3> YQU COULD DUPLICATE THE SOUND OF h STEftH 
TRAIN OR A PHASQft GUN? HGM ABOUT GUNSHOTS, WISHES, SIflESS, 
^AHKIMG DOGS AND OTHER SOUND EFFECTS? HOkl YOU CAN WITH OUR 
FTlQGRAWAa^ SOUND EFFECTS KIT. IT USES TIC ?€W *T8 PIN T.I, SOUND 
^YNTHESYZEH CHIP, SH76477 AND SUPPORT CIRCUITRY. 5 TO 12V0C 13 
&WIHED TO GIVE APPEBX. I/M tikTT CF AUDIO OUTPUT. HE PROVIDE THE 
P.C. BOARD, PARTS AND ISSTHUCTIQKS AIjDHG WITH A CHART TO PROGRAM 
SOME CONWON SOUNDS, USE YM IMAGINATION TO CREATE OTIGINAL 
'-, UN U EFFECTS, ORDEH: K-D1 16*95tLe^ Sf*r. ) V39.95 






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FANTASTIC SOUND EFFECT* 
CMP 



r*«| ft 'I* MA0V FL CDKTAtta A I_<?W 
WQUHCt 0SClkL*TO# VCO NfHM 

i *Taft Dwfe Shot mhi* *hd 

fhJFlClPE DOMrRDt Wl'H | FAflf 

manual a ip avcic 3>Si 



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HARD TO FIND 

VALUES' 

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klmn QUAD 

NORTOW AUP 

Wl illUOMt 4 LARGE 
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n»ia*i»i pf*igE -ma" 

1L..OW0. U5 TO SEL^ TUFy 



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fll i«1 * BbcA Sot HAttS Dnignacf *tti t«q« two*! led ^5s Id enruw;* 
tautws* T*v i^*m&9**mbm*mi*ai9MnanmaBf an urn btJOym' 
VtW g* Vp QuUny pm *w pp«| (>C BcwM» th* uncu* 0WQ" 0* *** 

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Euru|Hari liren sound Grsni tin alarmi or toy* 
DLMfittei fram B-12VDC .i« Up Hi 1 amp iusma 
lifVL'JC*fl ohm speikur| Ovni (Jw tliouund 
hM lit-r" iatd. Ail flarii InElurilnu PC ImmhA, 
*% Cf\ OR0EHWB-O3 



COMFtETE ZULU CLOCK «JT 
ftWe^QMH.^ AH CjW»0O- 



HMHMUVQ 1 

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ALL COMPONENTS 100"- 
aUARAHTEED 

CAJfti 1 WtDEBfma If MM* * rt-l * 
m "OL* Ml PEfi M«* 0» 
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■■.+ ■*» 



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1W1.0O 

TV 1.00 

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10/1 DO 



100/t. 



UNUAHKEn poweb moot I «*n 



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POWER SUPPLY KIT 
PS-14 

" itnwr Ih*n 20OMV liwtj *ncl hnv i-vpil«liDn 

* Foldback Currrnf I.i^iIimi, 

1 ShtKt CircuH ProCKtBrt LB* ^S?Bt^ 



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^^SifiMKQ^M^ 



■ TrwKrnaE SfiuSdowT* 

* AJjuiiablfl CurrBnl Limiting *** 

* Lnttlian 1% frpulc 

* 1B>mpiVL& T i5l4JV 
' All parts supplied nvliiriina hpivv duly Inni 

* Qu*lH¥OiiTft.Hitrfr[jJmiPCbMrd. 



p^G 






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**-- *JT» 



MC135fP FMIP AMP 
AMD DltCAlHfNATOn 

[I ^aa «f«in 



ttme« bmct 

ECS I*) W HAM* 



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REVIEWED IN 7/78 73 MAG. 

I5AC0NT. 20AINT 42.95 



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UV1A24I VirUlflp DoJB 10pW Fiom 7 I 
Ttirwng Range <•* 

2NEU3 Hisn Fraq. Amp 1 Witt ^ 1 B 

OH? 1 TQ-S Cheb slylB. HDuM * Ml! 

MF C400DB 'a W*1i Audio Amp 4 prn p| H . 



1k pack 



■Of 



H1 10 103 1D0V 3 A SCR Ulhi s*r»«ivi> 
(HID* **nrt» from TTL TO 230 *Sf 

HfOJSS MV 3A Tti« SofWOVO Cm- 



3*&**. 









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OVERVOtTAGE PROTECTION KIT 

6.95 

twvtvt^ ■ iiilpilBlili hwn' 3 to jfi'rtjMa" 

* KA 5CH wd «wi ID* oalpwl to i 
Sh*Xi1d be ikHti <yn uitttJ Qui n *n 
• ir> Ow »S 13 •« P* 14. All 



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lOrtfrOVPII 



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NEVER A SWEETER 
HET1HI 

Htjai/Krijl Amarrcin m*d* [j.ir^l 
rripi*ri p» * sfiap la tnslall Hugn 
tV* w MitM diBlih ans but » rM*J. V&u 
mwhjUJ Bcped Id par mart to" lacn 
than «k pM tv flie pvl MATCHED 
SETpi5VDC 0-»ADC 



MK-03A CLOCK/TIMER KIT 

Features 24 hour Zulu r*nm And up 10 24 H-uur; pi elflp^J 
lime an che same Ht of im rliijit LED readouts. Totally 
inm-pi'MiJnTiT 45p*raT|cin ot poUi lurvu('orii Clock has pro 
lulljibl* 1 nbrni v^ilh Iff unniHr viTOff Tirrnii h&S rest! 

iold. jr»d Muni ibiiKi'oni FuM fuj'W *«d owetwaitpoe 

flfOtBCtion.. 24 hrjui wnif R«KhXfH fill rfimmin- ttpturfc 
at Chpy t»n tw lunwd oft wvfhoul cfnturbinp thi c>KA or 
Timer Timrhir HK^wdtjd < 1 V »ccuf icy] Because of th* 
m*n^ ooiiofB and imunlma con*M»n i #[iQni J+sp case and 
■wttfte* arc ncn inckidBd & *rt rl n n an tfandard Typei 
w,if tit towfe iundard *«r.T«h wmi^i case. 






S-' 



28,95 






TteutlteMd 



72301 General Pvrpctw Op Amp Loffd Can 3/t-M 

7?7?3 Volt Rag IC |taxas InuMFtiatThiMO Lead Can J» 
13741 FET Input 74t OpAnf^MH # Mini Dip 3/1.10 
S-3SPFtI CatsmKL Trimm* Cap Small A Slahte 

4S 1073 » 
30,000 WTJ 

T&Vtm C9«YUlv Oalfei Cap 3V ^MPS^»r MO 10/1I.H 
3 3MT*d e3VDC Qa> Tantalum (imparr) Radol uha 

■VIM 

See You in DAYTON I 



CAPAClTOfti 



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>N0 C00*S -ADD 5% FOR SHIPPING -ORDERS UNDER 810. 

-SEND CHECK OR MONEY -TEX RESIDENTS ADD 5% TAX ADD .75for HANDLING 

ORDER OR CHARGE CARD NO,- FOREIGN ORDERS ADD (0%, 

PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED ON VISAS MC 



GRAB BAG 

A T*fr nee as&artmenl of 
1 iw mere, vonago nngst 
Of p If em 2.7 to » VOC laoal 
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■hop 12 



COPYRIGHT 



jX Reader Service — see page 795 



177 



WE HAVE A RAM FOR EWE 

. , . And we're not pulling the wool over your eyes, although we do feel a little 
sheepish about including this many puns in the ad copy. We're offering the 
popular 2102 1K static RAM at only $9.90 for ten of them (sorry, we can't sell 
single units at this price). These are low power parts that will work with any 
2 MHz CPU system . . . but they're going pretty fast, so stock up now. 



Tin plated, low profile, soldertail types: 



SKL8 

SKL14 

SKL16 

SKL18 

SKL20 

SKL22 

SKL24 

SKL36 

SKL40 



8 pin 
14 pin 
16 pin 
18 pin 
20 pin 
22 pin 
24 pin 
36 pin 
40 pin 



10/51,85 
10/S1.95 

8/$2.25 
8/S2J5 
fl/52.95 
3/S1.10 
5f$1.75 
2/51,25 



7%> 






3 level wire wrap, gold plated types: 
SK3W1414 pin 10/53.85 



SK3W1616 pin 
SK3W1818pin 
SK3W2020 pin 
SK3W2222 pin 
SK3W2424 pin 
SK3W2828 pin 
SK3W3636 pin 
SK3W4040 pin 



10/54.25 

50.75 ea. 
50.88 ea. 
$1.00 ea. 
51.00 ea. 
51.35 ea. 
$1 .55 ea. 
51J5 ea. 



MA1003 CLOCK 
AND CASE SPECIAL: 

$19.95! 



O O * O "' 
□ u * O u 



12 VOLT, 8 AMP 
POWER SUPPLY KIT 

$44.50 

12A capacity with 50% duty cycJe, fold back current 
limiting, crowbar overvoltage protection, many more 
features. For transceivers, portable tapefTV equipment, 
disk drives, etc. Easy to assemble — except tor trans- 
former, diodes, and filter caps, all parts mount on heavy 
duty circuit board. Does not include case. One of our all 
time best sellers , . . probably because It works, and 
works well, for a long time, 



it's hard to find a clock that's easier to build than this 
one ... or one that's more versatile. Module includes 
built-in time base — ideal for portable or mobile opera- 
tion. Requires 12 VDC T either batteries or AC adapter. 
Readouts are blue-green fluorescent types thai don't 
wash out like LEDs do, Our matching case Includes an 
optical filter to bring out the best in the readouts, as 
well as mounting hardware for attaching case to 
dashboard etc, 

The MA1003 module is available separately for $16,60; 
the case is available separately for $5.95. 



BIPOLAR 

POWER SUPPLY 

KIT: $1 5.00 

This highly cost-effective unit gives you 
a tightly regulated !/« Amp or more per 
side. Includes transformer, circuit boards, 
and all parts, but less case and line cord. 
Specify project #13 and choice of voltage 
— either ±5, 6 t 8, 9, 12, or 15 Volts, Est 
cellent for op amp experimentation, 
music synthesizers, etc, 



PET ROCKS 



(some people call them crystals) 



XT500K 

XT1M 
XT1 .84320 
XT2M 
XT3.58W 

XT4M 
XT4.5315M 

XT5M 
XT8M 
XT9M 



500 KHz, series mode, fundamental, wire leads. MC6/U 
package . . , $4.95 

1 MHz f otherwise same as above . . ♦ $5.95 
1.84320 MHz, otherwise same as above . . . $5.95 

2 MHz, otherwise same as above . . ■ $5,95 

3,58 hAHz colofburst crystal, otherwise same as above . , . $Z2S 

4 tAHz, series mode, fundamental, HC18 package , , , $4.95 
4.5315 MHz, otherwise same as at>ove . . . S4.95 

5 MHz, otherwise same as above . . . $4.95 

6 MHz, otherwise same as above - . . $4,95 
9 MHz, otherwise same as above . . . $4.95 



XT10M 


10 MHz, otherwise same as above . 


. $4:95 


XT12M 


12 MHz, otherwise same as above . 


. $4,95 


XT15M 


15 MHz, otherwise same as above . 


. $4.95 


XT1BM 


18 MHz, otherwise same as above . 


. $4.95 


XT20M 


20 MHz, otherwise same as above . 


, $4.95 



TERMS: Add Si handling to orders under Si 5, Allow up to B%fc shipping, excess refunded Allow more for 
power supplies. Please include street address for UPS delivery Prices good through cover month of 
magazine VISA 4 "'Mast of charge' call our 24 hour order desk at (415) 562-0636. CODs OK Mil h street 
address. Cat. res. add sales tax, THANKS FOR YOUR BUSINESS! ^ G4 

FREE CATALOGUE: We've done our part by telling you tnnt we have a free catalogue, now you have to do 
your pari and send lor It ♦ . , you won't be sorry. II you just can't wait, Include 41 e In stamps and we'll 
send It out first class. 




BILL GODBOUT ELECTRONICS 

eox 2355. Oakland airport Ca 94614 




178 



f Transistor Checker 




— Complefaty AaaamfaJad 
- Battary Opar i!*d - 

fha AS I Tnnjffioi Chaclir rn 
■tola of chatting a **■(!• 'mhqs of 

Or QUI of effCUJt to OP « rata. 

i.mply plug ina irinilitor tq be 
th«ckwJ fnto l^i FtQrt( pan ^1 

tchik#t. dit connacT it vultfi tha alli- 
gator clip ttti InadM provldad. 
Tn» unit safely and flutomaUefillY 
fOanjIflM law h ni»dJLifli and h^flh- 
power PNP And NPN t» am mori. 



Trans-Check s 29.95 ea. 



MICROPROCESSOR COMPONENTS 



Custom Cables & Jumpers 




DB23P (» fkttzfld) PLUG {tl*tt& «S23?» 12 ft 

SOCKET lUwis AS232I 13 50 

Caoit Cow tor Dfl?5P 0* DB25S Si .75 

PRINTED CIRCUIT EDGE- CAM) 

Tirr-itou&a hat Out - HftaacM CunTO - raj Ma * m P C Cjhs 

sua 

32,49 
$2.95 

16 95 
Cfi.DS 



Pin No, 

0B25P-4-P 
DB25P-4 S 

DR2&S--I-S 

DJM-1 

DJ1B-1 

DJ?4-1 

DJH-M4 

DJ16-1-15 

DJ241^24 

For 



OB 25 Series Cables 
C able Langrh Connector* Pf *« 

4 Fi 2-0P25P Si 5 95 « 

T-DP25P r-24S ST6 95S3 



4 n ,M>P?SS 

Dip Jumpers 



i fi 

i n. 
i fi 
i n 

1 n 



! \4 Pin 

MB Pin 
i -2A Pin 
2-14 Pin 
2- 15 Pin 
2-Z4 Pui 



St7 9«tw 

£1 59 oa. 

1 79 ea. 

2 79 ea 
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CONNECTORS 

25 Pifl-D Sub-miniature 



i5/3a PIWS (Solder Eyelet? 

)t/3G PINS (Solder Eyeiei) 

22/« PINS (Solder EyahaO 

50/100 ( 100 Spacing) PINS (Wire Wrap] 

50/100 ( MS Spacmni PJMS .Wii* Wrap) 



Reei-1 




Solar Cells 
2x2cm 



* 0,4 tfolis 
100mA 
•41 MW 



Can be added in lenes for 
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higher current. 

*SC 2x2 £1.95 ea or 3/S5.00 



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the 3 Ta Hand 



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MAKES CIRCUIT ASSEMBLY A BREEZEI 
Lou you work with both hands. 
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Praia Board 203 




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Hchmi 
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n Ad* »t 24,95 



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JE701 



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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_ «^ aa aa —a —a — ^ — 



REMOTE C0NTB0L 
TRANSMITTER * EEC irVRR 




INSTRUMENT/CLOCK CASE 

This case is an in|cclion molded 
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is DVW. COUNTER or CLOCK 
cases lEhasdiuief»i6n:5 0f4JVi" 
to length by f ti width by 
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PART NO: IN-CC S3. 49 each 




Modal 2e00 

Ctfl»t *iiT" M 

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'Can supply up to ^.SV. 

±9V and i12V with 

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*tncliidai ■eo«HfWfl4BTt» k 

Iwdwiri tk in«fU£HQT5 



JE205 




L*EE 




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*5V,i9Vindi12V 

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board 
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IPO MA. HMl ■ 0?S HWB . 2225 




TRS-80 

16K Conversion Kit 

Expand your 4K TRS-80 System to 16K. Kit 
comes complete with: 

- 8 each UPD416-1 (T6K Dynamic Bams) 250NS 
* Docurnemaiion tew conwefsion 



TRS-16K 



$99.95 



COMPUTER CASSEHES 




. 6 EACH 15 MINUTE Mgf 
QUALTTV C 15 CASSETTE5 

* PLASTIC CAS€ INCLUDED 
\2 CASSETT1 CAPACITY 

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CAS-6 

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SUP 'R' MOD II 

UHF Chifinel 33 TV Inlerface Unit Kit 

W«B Band B W or Ceipi Sysam 
+ Converts TV to Video ftstfay w 
noma cemputtn. CCTV nmati. 
AppB II. works nfdi Cfemeco Daz- 
m. SOL 20, SftS-80, QBaanQar, 

MOD II is rjrifufajd re Qonnti jj 
(UHf) 
* Induces euuul cidle and anianrta 
iranslQiniar 




$29.95 Kit 



tLLV 




MacM Pi 10 includes Z 100 wooti *2* AWG 
aritt wrap *i rt 




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Model P180 Tool $24.50 

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tip« tocdwn wftft ti mienai 
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SZ9.50 



63-Key Unencoded Keyboard 




Tr>is is a 63 -kay, tafminaJ keyboard newly manutactured by a 
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Hexadecimal 

Unencoded 

Keypad 

19-key pan mdirfltes 1-10 keys. 
ASCUEf anfl 2 option* keys tnd a 
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179 



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ici-tv.'FM SPtlCtRS, lor 300 ohm thMdvd twinftid, Bj k rU It. [a 5547) 
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10-G.E. POWER TAR TRANSISTORS. D40M.N2, 

Mr" HOCK TRIM POTS. 200* i "25351 

1-12VOC SMIL Rt ID RELAY, soit NO 2200 obn 

SO- TEMP. COLftK Ft N'T VOLTAGE RET. DIODES 

12-5RINNT TRIM POTS. PRECfSlON. «it iSf**. 

bO-pc-^RECUT, P1IT1NNED WIRE, <,sw^u% h^gtb* *nd (oio*T<*1971 ' 

b0 MIN I RESIST OR*> for PC AppL vrrt.lIW, color cadrd \ • 221S> . . 

20-NYLON GEARS. fv-qiuJitv u»t w t*i*3444J , 

10-5* POTS, mpJIn Uptf. plaslii in*n-tn mounliftgl '51241 

10-142MEG DUAL POTS, audkj lipn. irup-in mounlmgitfS12S> 

10-1 AMP^ENERS. *id»4i*l(jl vjluet, unTHtedUl944) 

12-SCR r S A TRI ACS. 10 AMP. Jill * iWt, unHsltd) *20R7) , , 

1- QUADS ACS, 10 AMP, 100% prime. 50-1GO-300V, TO-220M504B> ........ 

20 MINI RECTIFIERS, IV, AMPS, 2SV, epasy, J x i jH » 5 374 1 > ♦ *.*»»,, . 

1 D-2N3704 TR ANSI ST OR£. silicon, TO-42 mi, hf*- 300 100% iv 5625) , . , 

504F TRANSFORMERS, »lt iircbU35A9) . . , « *.»*,- 

10-TV CHEATER CORD |ACKSf#SSl9J ., •■,»•• 

T0-2N3705 TRANSISTORS, silicon. TO-92 c»» r ble-150 100% l^54<2bl 

4-1.5V SILVER OllOE WATCH RATTiR*E5, ip«H* r RW.15 r lK*506Jl 

3 I CD W ATCH READOUTS, SV'dOtift, 7 w*. dim T^j i 1 C*SOMI ...*»*. 

100 RED RLOCl DISC CAP3 f *Hl *dur>*. 50% milerul 1 * 1190) 

It-INSTRUMENT Ik MORS, uil tlrfrt «Ad toion, '* *h*fH*512K 

4- MILE HOLDER 5. Iw Cii *nd frth*t mobib? njp ^S434l .»..«*. 

S0.1H4000REC Tlfl(Ri r iMtloOOOV. «t«n-2594> 

20-UPRIGHT Elf CTROS, »rt'd vdiM 4 rapjciun« f*3224AK 

t-UHf TUNER *oJidn*l«, iLuMltfdf?pc<'292T>. 

fr-lTS A5NAF 9 VUC14T tfip, trd n bUr/k b?adi=>28ii' 

0-1400 VOL 1 'RED BAIL" RECTlWRS, uul 1 AMPl*25Wt 

20-1 N41 40 SWITCHING OiODES, 4 m«c. j*i*H =3000* 

fc-10 AMP QU ADR ACS, w.'lriga*f d^odf up bOOVJ B Jb20i. 

S-MICR0 SWITCHES, puih. »■! lypri 1^3011) ■ • 

40 SQUARE DISC STYLE CHOKES, color codedt^3203> 

30-TRAN.5FSTOR5 1 092 2N440O trrki, u ft«f (*3291 ) 

U TRANS1ST ORS 1 RANSFORMERS. judici. lnt«-r P etc mJnif * 32951 ,*,*< 

1 5-PRINT ED Cfcl TRIMMER POT S, m< vlluei, e«r;[«334a) ,..,,,,,„* 

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* of the nine cat. no. 



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12 for I.N 

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ISO lor 1.30 

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100 fort- » 

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lb for 1.34 

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4 for 1 .30 

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4 lor 1.10 

2 for 130 

100 for 1.30 

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120 for 1.30 

120 fort JO 

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20 fort » 

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6 lor t.30 

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t for 1.30 

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30 for 130 
It For 1 to 



FREE! FREE! 
Buy '20°° Worth 

*h Choose Any Two 
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HSji^ 



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c«t ■*. tacbiiitc 

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WATCH GUTS 

F"aftiir> 1«> #nmntf»" S" inur 
til l^nl \ n>" rn difrtt*l l*lf' 

nut, . yMttmnt*" Ttir imi{4ptr' 
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linhfn »iii»P T\ t'tirti" I iMh- 
HtU'Ktt, MINl'THS 

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llATr! Smrv. (iiiPthf* Wi 4 n.- 



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INCHER" 

READOUT 



To b* mrl 021 of «n iiwb 
COMMIT I *TIH*D£ dn 

f*p|Bd*rn«nl Tut Latro* 

L*f1 LtririftMl 3V if 1 lUll* prt 

DCgm«(H R*ii 

Cil. Ma f TCU112T 



25 AMP BRIDGE 

RECTIFIERS 



0*«*r •« JJM * »iHf*I* 



^soectroi 

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» POTENTIOMETERS 

iS" i*iu*fi' ^niictv rsd Hulli c«r* **>•**- C'Pr^rit 
kbM. PbU. 8*t*wdtn*rr *d;«'«t 20*. t*J*rt»e». 
5 W»tl nlinfi. CTarmrt PBHtv«*two PCJ*o4»- 

OJtOM *T CAT. »0 AHt) If A LUC 



SINCLL 

TUItM UHICHT 

T r p« «l 

C«i. Mo. 

A2CU1141 



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25-TURTM UPRIGHT TURN TUT 
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too 


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30 


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too 


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loon 


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200» 






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2 FOR $1 .29 A 



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1N40O0 Epony Recti fieri 



C«t No Tro* 

21TT IH4O0I 

2271 1H*0Q? 

lilt 1M4002 

2UD 1H404U 

jsii m«ooi 

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50 10 fM 

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1 M 20 far 1 14 

• I 20 for 14. 

»I 20 fM H 

Lit »>«f 1 20 

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N lit»tt4»»»«»»"'""""' 

: POLY PAKS 

• ^-— ^TT"l P.O. BOX Ml- A6 

t> TrtXin***^..,* cri 1 VNNF1ELD 3" 



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SO LVKNF1ELD. HA 
01940 

T.rm*; Add Po^tajjo *•***> Net 30 

• Phono: 16175 245382S 

I RrtillMfi-.eDRlCRrmincM 

• MINIMUM Q*0ER SB ^'^^i 



v>P2 



181 



7294 N.W. 54 STREET 
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33166 



URPLUS 
LECTRONICS 



ORP. 



PHONE: (305) 8874228 
TWX: 810-8486085 

WHOLESALE RETAIL 



^S43 



PL259 f s/SO 239's 

Quality American Made 
10/$5.00 100/S35.00 

50/S20.00 1000/S300.00 



E- F.Johnson NICAD 

12.0 V. 1.2 AH @ 10 hr rate 
4 VZ 1 x 1 7/8" x 1 3/4*' $1495ea- 



E F Johnson External Battery 
Charger Model 239-0206 ooi output 

14,5 V dc ® 50 mA $3,50 ea 



E. F. Johnson Desk Top Microphone 

Ceramic Element/High Imp 

was £»«[ now $1 5.00 

While They Last 

NEW E.F Johnson Power Mid Less Cord 
Desk Top Sty re SI 9.95 ea 



E. F. Johnson S Meter 

Edge Meter 250 MA. Fils in Sfc" * 1-3JB" hole. 
MTG holes on each end 11/4" behind panel 
Black scale 0-5 bottom 1 20 top 
$i25ea. 5*55.00 



Edge meter same as above with silver scale 

and reads SWR 1 10 

*1.25ea 5/S50O 



E. F. Johnson Signal Strength 

Meter 2GQUA 2Vk 2 ¥1 "So, mounts tn 
1 »/■" hole V behind panel Scale 1 30 db lop 
0-5 bottom 
£4 95ea 5/S20.00 



PANEL METERS 

$4.00 ea 2 for $7.00 

10-0-10 dc Amps 
25-0-25 dc Volts 

0-25 dc Volts 
0-50 ac Volts 

-Shunt Required 



ASTATIC T-UG8-D104 

PREAMP Desktop microphone w/crysta! •>•* 
meni 3 Pin Plug $35 ea. 



CB SPECIAL 

Brand new printed circuit board assembly. Used in all 
HyGain 40 channel CB transceivers. Fits many other 
manufacturers" units also, Squelch pot/volume control/ 
channel selector switch not included. 

1- 9— 7.50 ea. &>** 

1 0-49—6.50 ea. Dimensions 

50-99— 6.00 ea. <r*ev 

100-up— 5,50 ea 

NEW Hy-Gain Remote 40ch CB Less Case. Speaker A Control Mic 
(as is) Si4 95ea 



IC SOCKETS 

Cambion 

Gold Plated Wire Wrap 

14 pin .35 ea 10/5300 

16 pin .38 ea 101*3,30 



New 40 CHCB Boards 

1^911050 ea 
10-49 S950ea 

Serviceman Special 

New My-Gain 40ch CB Less Case, Speaker & 



w/40chSW 

50-99 S9 00 ea 

iCX>upS8 5Gea 

Knobs (as is) 
$14 95 ea 



} 

} 



2 V*" x 3" 



2V4 M x2Va" 



CMOS 

RCA CD 4012 AE 

Dual 4 in Nand Gate 
6/$1.00 100/$ 10.00 

50/$6.00 1000/S80.00 



D Cell Nicad 

mfg. by G. E. 2.50 ea 

1.2 volts 3.5 amp hrs. 

cat No. 41BO04 AD08G5 



MINI TOGGLE SW 

C&H 

SPOT 

SlOOea 6*500 



E. F, Johnson 

40ch Selector 

Switch 

S3.50ea 



2 SIDED 

062 Copper Cl#d Board 

12 OOei 3. 15 00 



Sony RKA4A 

2 conductor mini phono 

plug mi patch cord 3' 6' 

tang $2 COea 



MODEM CABLE 

50' cable contains 
13 # 22 ga wire DB-25p with 
DB-51 226-1 cover on one end 
$6.50 ea 10/S50.00 



EFJ CRYSTAL OVENS 
6V/12V 75° 
$5.00 ea. 



MOTOROLA SRF 574 

house marked 

9W 175 MHz Amp. 

$5.00 ea. 



POLYFOAM COAX-50 OHM 

Equal to RG174 

$4.95/100' 

Low Loss 

Polyfoarn 

Coax Cable 



12 Vdc RELAY 

SPST Open Frame 

5 Amp Contacts 

Mfg-Magnecraft 

$1.50ea 4/S5.00 



Computer Grades 

34,000 uf @50 Vdc 3.00 ea 
3" diam x 6 V*" high Matlory 



Coax Connectors 

UG-273/U BNC-F/UHF-M 2.50 

UG-255/U BNC-M/UHF-F 3.00 

UG*146A/UN«M/UHF*F4.50 

UG-83B/U N-F/UHF-M 4.50 

UG-175RG-58 Adapt. ,20 

UG-176RG-59 Adapt. .20 



12 Vdc RELAY 
SPST 35 Amp Contacts 

Open Frame 
Rugged, great tor mobile use 



MUFFIN FANS 

3 Blades, 110 Vac, 4V*" sq. 

Removed from equipment — 

Excellent condition — $4.95 



RECEIVER FRONT ENDS 

Made by EFJ 

132-174 MHz 

$12.00 ea. 



$4.50 ea 



5/S2Q.Q0 



CRYSTAL FILTERS 
10.7 3/Lead 

Can Type 
$3,00 ea. 



CERAMIC IF FILTERS 

EFC L455K 
$3.50 ea. 



TRIMMER CAPS 

Small enough to fit 

in your watch— 

3.5 to 20 pF 

5 to 30 pF 

$.75 ea., 2 for $1.25 
5 for $3.00 



CAPS 

2200 UF fa 16V 

Radial Leads 
.25 ea. 10/52.00 



White Porcelain 

Egg Insulator 

1%"x r 5Cfcea. 

3 for $1 .25 



GOLD PLATED CARD EDGE CONNECTORS 



Double Row/Wire Wrap .100 

25 pins $3.49 ea 1Q/$30.00 

30 pins $3,96 ea 1Q/$32.00 

50 pins $5.43 ea 10/S45.00 



Double Row/Solder Eyelet .156 

6 pins $1.1 Oea 10/$9,00 

15 pins $1.55 ea 10/S12.50 

22 pins $2.08 ea 10/$ 17. 00 

43 pins $3.66 ea 10/S30.00 



22 pine/Double Row/Dipped Solder 

,156 $2.08 ea 10/$ 17.00 



22 pins/Double Row/Wire Wrap 
.156 $2.44 ea 1G/$19.00 



All maiettai guaranteed • tf for any reason you ate not sansfted, our products may he returned witntn 10 days tor a full refund {less shipping}. Please add $3 
ERMSl for shipping end Handling on ail orders Additional 5% charge tor shipping any item over 5 lbs. COD'S eccepted tor orders totaling tbOOO or more, AH orders 
shipped UPS unless otherwise specified. Florida residents ptease add 4% safes ran. Minimum order $15 00. 



EQUIPMENT / COMPONENTS / WIRE & CABLE / ACCESSORIES 



182 






GET YOUR 



ne* 



Published December 1st, 1978 




Specialize in DX? Then you're 
looking for the Foreign Callbook 

with over 280.000 calls, names and 
addresses of radio amateurs out- 
side the USA plus many valuable, 
additional features of interest to 
the DXY. 

FOREIGN CALLBOOK 

$14.95 

PLUS SHIPPING 




RADIO AMATEUR 



CALLBOOKS 



The U.S. Callbook has over 
350.000 W & K listings. It lists 
calls, license classes, names 
and addresses plus the many 
valuable back-up charts and 
references you come to expect 
from the Callbook. 

UNITED STATES CALLBOOK 




$15.95 

PLUS SHIPPING 



Respected worldwide as 
the only complete authority 
for radio amateur 
QSL and QTH information. 



See your favorite electronics dealer 
for the latest issue or order direct 
from the publisher using handy order 




Payment In U.S. funds must 
be sent direct! y to publisher 
oot through a bank. 



ORDER FORM 



R 
A 



dio 

ateur 





**R1 



k 



Ittrn 



□ ° 



S CALLBOOK 



| | FOREIGN CALLBOOK 



Pntf Each 



$15.95 



$14,95 



Shipping 



$1.75 



$175 



Tmmi Mm 



$17.70 



$16.70 



OOK inc. 



SHERWOOD DRIVE 
LAKE BLUFF, ILLINOIS 60044 



i 



i 
i 
i 
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Illinois residents only add 5% sales fax 



Name 



Address, 



TOTAL 



City. 



State. 



2'P, 



Charge my: D Visa Card □ Master Charge 

Card No 

oept, b Signature 



Expiration Date 



J. 



^ Reader Service— see page 795 



183 



ALDELCO ELECTRONIC CENTER 



BUILD A 6 DIGIT 500 MHz 
FREQUENCY COUNTER 



OVERVOLT 12 

Crow Bar circuit protects 
Transceivers & Tape Decks from 
runaway power supply voltage that 
can zap expensive components. OV 
12 causes fuse in Power Supply to 
blow if voltage exceeds preset level 
(approx, 16 to 18 volts). Rated at 25 
Amperes, $ 7.95 

Model OV5. Protects 5 Volt circuits. 
Triggers at 7.5 Volts $*L95 

Other units available at 3.3 to 100 Trig- 
ger Voltages Si 0.95 ea 



AEG 1074 SOWatt 
30 MHz $21.15 
AEC 1076 75Watt 
ih 5Q MHz $24.00 

bolh cases 500 4LFL 



Aldelco can supply 3 PC boards. Silk 
screened front panel and complete instruc- 
tions for only $12,50 & shipping. 



SOME PARTS USED IN COUNTER 

iTCSOPrescaler 14,50 

74C925 Multiplex 9 95 

F 9368 Drive; {2i 7 90 

1 MHz XTAL 7.95 

10 60 pF trim cap 60 

See six page construction article tn 
Dec. 1973 73 Magazine 




COMPLETE LUNCH COUNTER KIT S9&95 
Includes a reprint of si* page con struct ion article from 
1978 ■73 Magazine 



For repfim only send 50 cents fof handling 



Hard to find replacement for 
VHF Mobil© & Marine use 
Successfully used In Stan- 
dard and other VHF Rigs 
Hated 12 Watts at 200 MHz 
12.5 Volts with 5 3 DB Gam. 
Heat Sink stud (ftf32) isolated 
from leads. Only 51 2.30 




i»n* 



RF DEVICES 



AEC 1158 



2N2S76 
2N3375 
2N3553 
2N386G 
2N3926 
2N44.27 
2N5589 
2N5590 
2N5591 
2N5913 
2N6080 
2N60B1 
2N60S2 
2N6083 
2N60S4 
2N6094 
2N6095 
2N6096 
2NSQ97 



18W 

3.0W 

2.5W 

LOW 

7.0W 

LOW 

3.0W 

10W 

25W 

1J5W 

4 0W 

15W 

25W 

30W 

40W 

40W 

tsw 

30W 
40W 



200 MHz 
400 MHz 
175 MHz 
400MH2 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MH: 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 



T060 

TOB0 

T039 

T039 

TO60 

T039 

MT71 

MT72 

MT72 

T039 

MT72 

MT72 

MT72 

MT72 

MT72 

XT06PNP 

XlOG PNP 

X106PNP 

X106 PHP 



$12.35 

5.60 

1.40 

1,25 

8. 30 

135 

4.75 

7.80 

10.25 

1.70 

5.40 

8.45 

10.95 

12.30 

16.30 

6.60 

8.50 

10.35 

2000 



ALDELCO KITS 

DUAL DIGITAL 12/24 HOUR CLOCK KIT 
NOW WITH A NEW WALNUT GRAIN WOOD 
CABINET 



Features: 



z=-vi 



si 3i ea sin 



*»— 



12 or 24 Hour Operation on either dock 
Each Clock separately controlled 
Freeze feature for time set 
Easy assembly for clock and cabinet 



BIG 
0.5 LEDS 



MODEL ALD 5 w ONLY $49.95 



NEW! NEW! NEW 



FM2016A 



BSKDK 



144 to 149 MHz 1000 CHANNELS 



All the features of the 2015R and now with adjustable sine wave PL 60 Hz to 
203 Hz. Adjustable low power position 1 Watt to 16 Watts. 

Buy your KDK 2Q16A from Aldelco and we'u pay shipping and insurance in 
the 48 states. 



Out of staters save: 

New Yorkers must pay sales la* 



Sorry no charge cards 
accepted on 201 6A 

Low, Low Price 



FMMC1 



$369 



Regulated AC/PS 

Model FMPS 4R £39,95 





ALARM CLOCK KIT 

6 Big 0,5 LED Displays " On Board AC Transformer * 12 
Hour Formal with 24 Hour Alarm * Snooze Fealure ■ Elaps- 
ed Timer. Timer fealure makes ihis Popular in Broadcast 
Stations. Its a natural for cars, boats and campers when 
used with optional crystal lime base Fits our standard 
cabinet. $21.95 

Crystal time base when purchased with clock. $3.95 

12 or 24 HOUR DIGITAL CLOCK KIT 

Uses 0,5 Display LEO 5314 Clock Chip Freeze feature tor 
accurate set. fits our standard cabinet ONLY Si 9 95 



CLOCK CABINETS 

Woodgrain or btack feather 



ea.U.95 



SHOWN WITH OPTIONAL pPWQ MICRO PROGRAMMER 



Dynamic 
Touch 

Tone Mic 



CRYSTAL TIME BASE KIT 

Includes PC Board. Crystal, all pans and Instruc- 
tions S4 95 



CLOCK RLTERS 

Blue, fled. Green, Amber or Smoke 



160 



Blinky Rasher Kit 1295 

PC board. 555 & all parts works on 9 volts Mouse bull on— 
$1.00 



DIGITAL 

MULTIMETER & 
THERMOMETER 

3Vj Digit — 5 ranges on each 
function AC/ DC .2 Volts to 
2000 Volls Current 2 
Microamps to 2 Amps 
Resistance 2000 Ohms to 2 
Megohms Includes PC 
Board, ICL7107 Chip and all 
pans Onh/S49,95 



RF TRANSISTOR SPECIALS 



2N5589 
175MHz 

2N5590 
175 MHz 

AEC 1272 
220 MHz 

AEC 1451 

50MH7 



3 Watts 
13,75 

iGWatts 
S5 50 

30 Watts 
S12.30 

50 Watts 
$18.10 



CRYSTAL SOCKETS 

HOLDS QHC25U * 59 
Single HC25U 29 



NATIONAL A1188A 

9 digit calculator 
readout ,89 




NEW! 



Tunable 420 MHz 
Fast Scan TV 
Converter 



Receive Fast Scan Amateur TV in the 420 to 450 MHz Band 
with any TV set Low noise, high gam rf Amp wiih varactor 
tuned <nput and outputs Built in AC supply Comes in two tone 
walnut & beige cabinet measuring 1 7/TT x 4 1/4" x 41/6" 
Factory wired with 2 year guarantee $59,95 




THE VERY 

POPULAR 

TOPE 

ACCUKEYER 

KIT 



• Self Completing Dots & Dashes • Provision tor attachment of 25* or 512 

• Iambic Operation Bit Memory for OX or Contest work 

• Smote Dot & Dash Memories 



ADJUSTABLE POWER SUPPLY KITS 

5-15 Volts 500 MA $6.95 

12 28 Volts 500 MA 6.95 



Revised version of the Accukeyer featured in the ARRL Handbook Has 
more logical IC Layout and ON Board sidetone Oscillator includes PC 
Board. TTL (Cs. 555 Timer. tC Sockets. Switch, Speaker, Transistors, 
capacitors and resistors. Requires 5 VDC ONLY $19 95 

ACCUKEYER MEMORY KIT 

Simple low cost Memory Kit. Uses 2 programmable 1 101 Memory chips. Pro 
vides 2 canned messages of 30 Characters each Adaptable to Handbook 
and olher Accukeyers Includes PC board (same size as accukeyer board) 
and an pans Requires 5 VDC, 9 VDC $19 95 



ALDELCO 



^A2 



2789A MILBURN AVE, BALDWIN, N.Y. 11510 

516 3784555 



Add 6% shipping. Add SI .00 for order* under $10,00, Oat of U.S. A* add 15% shipping and certified check or money order in U.S. funds. 
1 84 p* flea o'er Servrce— see page 195 



arv. DIODES/ZENERS 

1N914 lOOv 10mA 


.05 


MICRO'S, RAMS, 
CPU's, E-PROMS 

QTY. 

8T13 2.50 


1N4005 


600v 


1A 


.06 


1N4007 


tOOOv 


1A 


.15 


TN4148 


75v 


10mA 


.05 


8T23 


2.50 


1N4733 


5Jv 


1 WZenner 


,25 


8T24 


3.00 


IN 4749 


24v 


1W 


.25 


STB? 


1.75 


1N753A 


6.2v 


500 mW Zener 


,25 


74S188 


3.00 


1N7B8A 


lOv 


ii 


.25 


148S 


1.25 


1N7S9A 


12v 


M 


.25 


1489 


1.25 


IN 5243 


13v 


" 


.25 


1702- 


4.50 


iN 52448 


I4v 


r i 


.25 


AM 9050 


4.00 


1N5245S 


I5v 


p p 


.25 


1 CM 7207 


6.95 


1N5349 


12v 


3W 


.25 


ICM 7208 


13.95 


qtv, SOCKETS/BRIDGES 

8-pin pcb *T6 ww 


,35 


MPS 6520 


10.00 


MM 5314 


4.00 


MM 5316 


4.50 


? 4-pin 


pcb 


♦20 ww 


.40 


MM 5387 


3.50 


15-pin 


pcb 


,25 ww 


.45 


MM 5369 


2.95 


16-pin 


pcb 


.30 ww 


.95 


[R 1602B 


3.95 


*\n . " 


pcb 


.35 ww 


1.05 


20-pin 


UPD414 


4.95 


22-pi n 


pcb 


.40 ww 


MS 


ZB0 A 


22.50 


24-pi n 


pcb 


.45 ww 


1,25 


Z8Q 


17.50 


28-pin 


pcb 


.50 ww 


1.35 


280 P10 


10.50 


40pin 


pcb 


.55 ww 


1.45 


2102 


1.45 


Molex pins .01 


To-3 Sockets 


.35 


2102L 


" r r 


2 Amp Bridge 


TOOprv 


.95 


2T07B-4 


4.95 


25 Amp 1 


Bridge 


200-prv 


1.50 


2114 


9,50 


?5i 3 


6.25 


oty. TRAN 


SISTORS, LEDS, etc. 

(2N2222 Rattle JO) 


.15 


2708 


11.50 


2N2222M 


2716 D.S. 


34.00 


2M2222A 






.19 


2716(5*4 


69.00 


2N2907A 


PNP 




.19 


2758 (5W 


26.95 


2N3906 


PNP 


iPtasttcl 


.19 


3242 


10,50 


2N3904 


NPN 


(Piesxicl 


.19 


4116 


11,50 


2N3054 


NPN 




,55 


6800 


13.9 b 


2N3Q55 


NPN 


15A 60v 


.60 


6850 


7.95 


Tl Pi 25 


PNP 


Par hrralon 


1.95 


LED Green 


Red, Clear. Yellow 


.19 


8080 


7,50 


D.L.747 


7seg 


5/8" High com^anod* 1,95 


8085 


22.50 


MAN72 


7 aeg com-anodfl (Rod) 


1.25 


8212 


2,75 


MAN 3610 


7 $eq corn-anode (Orange) 


1.25 


8214 


4.95 


MANS2A 


TfiS 


corn-anode (Yellow) 


1.25 


8216 


3.50 


MAN74 


7 seg 


com-caibode (Reef] 


1.50 


8224 


4.25 


FND359 


7 seg 


com-catnode (Red) 


1.25 


8228 


6.00 




9000 J 


JER1ES 

QTY. 

9322 


.65 


r~ &251 


J.SO 


QTY, 


8253 


18.50 


9X1 


85 




8255 


8.&0 


9309 


SO 




9601 


- JtJ 


TMS4044 


9,95 J 








9602 


,45 











TY. 



QTY. 



MOS 
QTY, 



QTY. 



4000 



.15 



4001 



,20 



4002 



.25 



4004 



3.95 



4006 



.95 



4007 



,25 



4O0S 



.75 



4009 



.35 



4010 



.35 



4011 



,30 



4012 



.25 



4013 
4014 



,40 



.75 



4015 



35 



4017 



.75 



4018 



.75 



4019 



,35 



4020 



.85 



4021 



.75 



402: 



75 



4023 



as 



4024 



.75 



4025 



.25 



4026 



1,95 



4027 



.35 



4028 



.75 



4029 



1,15 



4030 



. JU 



4033 



1.50 



4034 



2.45 



4035 



.75 



4037 



1.80 



4040 



.75 



4041 



69 



4042 



66 



4043 



.50 



4044 



.65 



4046 



1.25 



4069/74004 .45 

4071 " ~2 l £T 
— 3RB1 35 



loST 



^mr 



3o 



b i 1 



.95 



T55" 



45T5 



2.95 



4519 



35 



4047 



2.60 



4048 



1.25 



4049 



,65 



4050 



.45 



4052 



.75 



4053 



.95 



4066 



75 



4522 



1,10 



4526 



.95 



4528 



1.10 



4529 



.95 



MC14409 14,50 



MCI 441 9 435 



74C151 2.50 



^19 



INTEGRATED CIRCUITS UNLIMITED 



* 



7889 Clairemont Mesa Blvd., San Diego, California 92111 
Out of State 1-800-854 2211 Cable Address: IC USD Telex: 697-827 
(714) 278 4394 California Residents 1-800-542-6239 



NAME 



QTY. 

740C 


.20 


QTV. 

7492 


T T 
.45 


L - 

OTV. 

74H20 


M 


■ QTV. 

74LS76 


4-i 75 


74131 


.20 


7493 


.35 


74H2! 


2$ 


74LSB6 


J35 


7402 


20 


7494 


.75 


74H22 


.40 


74LSH 


m 


7403 


.20 


7495 


.SO 


74^30 


,30 


74LS93 


.85 


7404 


.20 


7496 


JO 


74K40 


Jfl 


74LS3S 


2.00 


7405 


.36 


74100 


1.15 


74H50 


.30 


74LS107 


,90 


7406 


.25 


74107 


.35 


74H51 


.30 


74LS1Q9 


1,50 


7407 


.55 


74121 


.35 


74H52 


.20 


74 LSI 23 


1,95 


74 OB 


.20 


7412? 


.55 


74H53 


75 


74 LSI 38 


2.00 


744B 


11 


74123 


.55 


74«55 


.75 


74LS151 


Pi 


7410 


20 


74125 


.45 


74H72 


is 


74LS153 


1.15 


7411 


25 


74126 


.45 


74H74 


.35 


741S157 


1.15 


7412 


75 


74112 


,75 


74H1D1 


35 


7415160 


1.15 


7413 


.45 


74141 


.90 


74H1D3 


.55 


74 LSI 64 


2.90 


7414 


.75 


741 SO 


.85 


74H1Q6 


1 15 


74LS193 


200 


7416 


.25 


74151 


.95 


74L00 


,3D 


74LS195 


T.15 


7417 


40 


74153 


.95 


74L02 


.30 


74LS244 


2.90 


7420 


,25 


74154 


1.15 


74L03 


.35 


74LS259 


1.50 


7426 


.25 


74156 


.70 


74L04 


40 


74L&298 


1.50 


7427 


.26 


74157 


.65 


74L1Q 


.30 


74LS357 


1.95 


li 39 


JO 


74161/3315 


74L20 


,45 


74LS3G8 


1,25 


7432 


30 


74163 


.85 


74L30 


.55 


74LS373 


2.50 


7437 


20 


741S4 


.75 


74L47 


195 


74SO0 


.45 


ros 


30 


74165 


1.10 


74L51 


.65 


74S02 


45 


7440 


20 


74166 


US 


74L55 


.85 


74S03 


S 


7441 


1.15 


74175 


.90 


74L72 


,65 


74504 


J5 


7442 


55 


74T76 


.35 


74L73 


.70 


74305 


.45 


7443 


.45 


74177 


1.10 


74L74 


)h 


74S08 


.46 


7444 


.45 


74130 


.95 


74L75 


1.05 


74ST0 


.45 


7445 


.75 


74181 


2.25 


74L85 


2,oa 


74S11 


45 


7446 


.70 


74182 


,75 


74L93 


,75 


74S20 


.35 


7447 


.70 


74190 


1.25 


741123 


US 


74S22 


55 


7448 


.50 


74191 


1J5 


74LS00 


.40 


74S40 


JO 


7450 


.25 


74192 


-75 


74LS01 


.40 


74S50 


.30 


71S1 


,25 


74193 


■ 85 . 


74LSQ2 


.45 


74S51 


.35 


7453 


.20 


74194 


S5 


74LS03 


45 


74SS4 


'b 


7454 


.25 


74195 


.95 


74LSU4 


.45 


74S74 


.70 


746Q 


,40 


74196 


.96 


74LS05 


,45 


74S112 


,60 


747Q 


.45 


74197 


.95 


74L50B 


.45 


74S114 


,85 


7472 


,'UI 


74198 


1.45 


74L509 


.45 


74S133 


.85 


7473 


.25 


74221 


1.50 


74LS10 


.45 


74S140 


75 


7474 


30 


74295 


1.50 


74LS11 


.45 


745151 


,55 


74 75 


,35 


.'-'Oh? 


U5 


74LS20 


45 


745153 


.35 


7476 


.40 


75*91 


.65 


74LS21 


45 


74ST57 


98 


7480 


.75 


75492 


.55 


74LS22 


.45 


74S158 


.80 


7481 


85 


74HOO 


.21) 


74LS32 


50 


745194 


1.50 


7482 


.95 


74H01 


.30 


74LS37 


4S 


74S195 


200 


7483 


.95 


74H04 


.30 


74LS38 


.55 


74S257,3t23^ IX 


7485 


.75 


74H05 


.25 


74LS40 


.70 


8131 


2J5 


7486 


.55 


74H08 


.35 


74LS42 


.95 




7489 


1.05 


74H10 


.35 


74LS51 


.75 




7490 


.55 


74H11 


.25 


74LS74 


.95 




7431 


.70 


74H15 


.45 


J4LS75 


1.20 







l 2 L, 



QTY. 



LINEARS, REGULATORS, ETC, 

QTY. QTY* 



MCT2 



.95 



8038 



.225 



LM2Q1 



OS 



LM301 



,45 



LM308 



.65 



LM309H 



.85 



LM309 (340K-51 1,50 



LM310 



.85 



LM3l1!S-14Pin} .75 



LM318 



1 f 50 



LM320H6 



,79 



LM320H15 



.79 



LM320K24 



.79 



7905 1LW320KS) 1.65 



LM320K12 



1.65 



SJW320K15 



1.65 



LM320K24 



1.65 



LM32QT5 



1.65 



LM32QT12 



US 



LM320T1S 



1 .65 i 



LM373 



3,95 



LM377 



3,96 



7aLOS 



.25. 



LM323K 



5.95 



LM324 



1.25 



LM339 



.75 



7805O40T5J 1,15 



LM340T12 



,95 



LM340T15 



.95 



LM340T18 



.95 



LM340T24 



. jl> 



LM340K12 



1.25 



LM340K15 



1.25 



LM340K18 



i^i 



LM340K24 



1 H 25 



78L12 



.75 



7&L15 



,75 



7SM05 



,75 



LM3BOIB-l4Pin3 1.19 



LM709 (&14Pin) .45 



LM711 



.45 



LM723 



.40 



LM725 



2.50 



LM739 



1.50 



LM741 {8-14) .45 



LM747 



1.10 



L.M13Q7 



1.75 



LM1458 



.65 



STREET ADDRESS 



CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



PHONE 



AE VIM 
CHARGE CARD # BA MC, 



LM3900 



.95 



LM75451 



.65 



NE555 



.45 



NE556 



£5 



NE565 



1.15 



NE566 



t + 25 



NE567 



SB 



TA7205 



6.95 



76477 



2,95 



95H90 



9.95 



EXP. DATE 



SPECIAL DISCOUNTS 



C.O.D. 



WILL CALL 



UPS 



POST. 



NET 10th OF THE MONTH. 



- PO #. 



ALL ORDERS SHIPPED PREPAID - NO MINIMUM - COD ORDERS ACCEPTED - ALL ORDERS SHIPPED SAME DAY 
OPEN ACCOUNTS INVITED - California Residents add 6% Sales Tax. PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. 
24 Hour Phone Service — We accept American Express / Visa / Ban kAmericard / Master Charge 



Total Order 


Deduct 


Vvw'$il9 


tOK 


S1 004300 


15% 


S301-S1000 


20% 



VARIABLE POWER SUPPLY KIT $11^ 



Continuously Variable from 2V to over 15V 

Short Circuit Proof 

Typical Regulation of 0,1% 

Electronic Current Limiting at 300mA 

Very Low Output Ripple 

Fiberglass PC Board Mounts AH Components 

Assemble in about One Hour 

Makes a Great Bench or Lab Power Supply 

Includes AN Components except Case and Meters 






FREE 



tCgf FETi WITH 
S5&S10 ORDERS. r 
DATA SHEETS 
WITH MANY ITEMS. 



DIDOES 
ZEWiB 1 
RECTIFIERS 



ADD SI. 25 FOR POSTAGE /HANDLING 



SPECIALS -THIS MONTH ONLY 



ElMininitKii DindnlillV lDniil 
EVu immii u m DiDiic DDV JllOrn^ 
'.iIm.u.i Hindi ;i:UV lllniA 
Hot Cirriir Diad* (HP?BDD, rtcJ 
Pnwii VtiBi:1ni \ -W fim » HHMHi 
CSptftt Jfa EircurEi mdnllril wilti t i) 
0IQ0I CHAi BAI] Miami mini, nctilnn, rti 



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IK741 

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UXTSE 

HC459 

IfrKfV 



Law liii Euinil Dp 4ibp Supw 711 
5 Vril 8#fuijlft* TD-3 

fld|Mrt*1ilH Vuluji Hiyutiror 2-37V 
2 Will AuUm f givi i ft m pM nr D 1 1' 

Phiu linknl In ii |i DIP 

Pwuhrii Vuliiyi ll^iiliiaf DIT 

Dual 141 C<ni^imul»i Op Amp DIP 

IU4«ilSuiiGrUMII0Hi I) DIP 
FET Nprt Dp Amp tlbi Hi i3l/iA7«D 
4-TFMtiair Afnv/DiritaftM 
WAP AmpJ-lwr Dt 1i IttUHi 

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1*4* 



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3.50 
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3/11 
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11,71 
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SEND FOR ADVA'S NEW 1579 CATALOG 
NEARLY 1000 S£l*4COMHjCTO*S KITS. CAPACITORS ETC SEND 2M STAJ* 



ihMln 



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TriAJClSTORS IfUASSTOftl riU»SISTOaj LWEAHKTi 






i Mi i* 

1VHIH 

1«11« 

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1MH1" 
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1MDD1 

1MICHI4 

lNIDDt 

IFfqaUd 

1WodJ 

1N414-B 

1WiH* 

1H411I •» 

1H4N 

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IMZJlU 
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OTHER ADVA KITS: 



UMHC PNOK KH-Ui* -nw WCQ T7v OTL, *U. KTv WHU. iro mm NOB *C% 

kum * ijniMsjffB ipji m pi pwvtif iw l ml ■h tm Ni ii Otm anty ■ tar mA tram drtitfc 
tPWV tm 0«»i L£B Mdwt. CH^iUn kn Wawdiii m«rid« kan. ONI V t7 JM 
'■UP wiGuuir Ed Powtfl tuwi¥ KiYs-ttanotfr'ii WW riih ifwnfttl eumiw 
limllihp ComfifcTt |Ln ■htd r^ncH rtflmintoJi gl Q.gfv «mftl Vim MinU Pdf IhtUI »lKHunn 
pPtHM Afi-liLili lor 5V 9 StUmA, (IV * HKHfiA, «V » SDCnrlA, 13V ■ *OOniA. 1|V • 
:iOOniA Stwcirt wDlciftr wiee-ii ardlnha Mn » 

Thus uiy Se-awwiD*t kill !nclua~t ill wntporwHli, gamp!*** dHi+Ht«J inftriMTllBm ind phuki 
MluiyMu PC t»#rtt. Caww hid#Iv Hn tin rwt IndutH) am or *httorv AtM Vl /Ii pnr *-i 'nr 
ihwi «)i in4 Imidju^a 

(MAIL NCWI FHf E DATA SHICT^ inniii«J «i*ri mulv ttAn IVctw Win *J *H1I OH 

WpOLiI$T-mt Op Aro wi-h »t^t tmttr o* ton* #w*-74g Du*i Op Amp w n* 

f rrn«Wi«Hrv w*f o*IFBj« mon. pMbMrlwd irwrli H'ST/W.OfwTMt taprpwonhi. 

OHOiPi TOO** -mi «**« «Ava t 

«i(ipiinrwi^MDm-i»4 

*0* FBf E CATALOG iT* «MW#« aw U 




US 



MORE SPECIALS: * 

RC4135DN -1SV • GOmA VOLTAGE REGULATOR *C V«r* mey fa 

ua. Mak« « nppl Hhfh** Rt^l^ed :15V Silpp^ fw OP AMr,. * (t . 

R*quirei only um*fukitad DC I10-3OVI «nr| } 

With Data Shwl ind Schdiintici B-pjn mDIP 
RC4 136 Quad 741 Lo* Muih Op Amp mDIP 
LM1304 FM MuluptiiK Siwmi. Demodulator DlP 
LM2111 FM IF Subtvinfli OF Amp. Opt. p LimiterJ DIP 
1Nfi2«a Hot Currrtr Di«J* 0.*V © 1mA O.lttt DO-35 
ZENEFIS-Spoeily Volld^ J.3, 3.9, 4,3. 5.1, 6.8, S.2 

9.1. 10, 12. 16, 16 L 16. 20, 22, 24, 27 F or 33V <'Hyx.| 



t1-2S 

SO 95 

D.99 

0J0 

1JW 

AOOmW 4/Sl.DD 

1 Willi 3/S1.DD 



• MONEY^BACK GUARANTEE 

• ALL TESTED AND GUARANTEED 



ADVA 

BOX 4181 GB, WOODS! DE, CA 94062 
TeL<415) 328-1500 



ELECTRONICS 



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*SUPER SPECIALS: * 



1N34 Cflihijiniwm Oiode 10/Sl 

1N914 TOOV/IOtnADiod* 20/41 

1N4TOT50WlAPlKiiftar 15/S1 

1N41543QV 1NA14 2b,^1 

BR1 50V !4A Drntitf R« 4/S1 

2N2222 NPN Imnintof 6/S1 

2N21M/ PMP Trnnhiilnr 6.-S 1 

2N3065P&w*r Ktatar IDA S0.75 

2N3904 NPS Am(t/Sw . J 1 00 ft'Sl 

7N390e PMP Amp-'Sw iOOO 6 $1 

CP6&DPfrirtt FtT >iAmp S5 



FSA7&D1M Ulgjfa Arrpy 
MPF102 200MHrRF Amp 
406/3 MOSFET RF Amp 
LM324 CJliihI 741 Op Amp 
LM3?ePoiVall R^mDlP 
NtBBSTknw mDIP 
LM723 2 37V Ri«DlP 
LM741 Comp Op Amp mDJP 
LM1468DimI 74 1 mOIP 
CA3000 5 Tritn An-py OIF 
RCUSPwXmn 1A30W 



Rf391 RFPuw* Amp Tr*n*rj»r lO^BW « 3 30MHi TO 3 
565X T IM Ip**1hf Dif terpnr ptfAt from SB& I * '*»u i 
HQ4194TC Pu4 T<«efc»f flcfulptoi i02 lo 30V • 200mA TO€6 
RC4 1«T« DuN Tr^nf flipJilm -15V • 1 00mA (TO-iA* 
6038 wpn toti i L Gjjhmkm % n '. ww *rtfi C«tuin h \ 



2«1 

3 S1 

Si. 75 

94 

.55 

.38 

3/S1 

6/S1 

3/S1 

67 

70 

SS.00 
3VS1 
S250 
SiZJS 
«L7G 



NEW SPECIALS 



LM318CN 

LM3180 

LM339N 

LM380M 8 

NE567V 
XR5B7CP 
LM723CN 
LM747CN 

SAD1024 

XR 2206 DP 
XR2242CP 



Highspeed Op Amp 5DV/asmDIP 
High Speed Op Amp 50V/^s DIP 
Quad Comparator Single or Dual Supply 
Vm Audio Power Amplifier 8-22V 

Tone Decoder (PLL) 0.01Hz to BOOkHz 
Tone Decoder (PLL) 0.01Hz to BOO kHz 
Precision Voltage Regulator 2-37 V DIP 
Dual 741 Compensated Op Amp 

Dual 512 Stage (1024) Audio Delay Line 
"Bucket Brigade" Appl. Data included 
Function Generator with applic. data 
Long- Range Precision Timer ms to days 



1 YEAR TIMER Kit 2 XR2242sand Applic. flute 



LM2901N 
CA3018A 
CA30Z8A 
RC4558 



Quad Comparator +5V or 2 to 36VDC 
4-Transistor Array /Darlington 
RF/IF Amplifier DC to 120MHz 
Dual High Gain Op Amp mDIP 



SPACER Kit ■ 4 ea of 5 assorted size spacers 

tlS VOLT Regulated Power Supply Kit-Easy assembly, 
6m V regulation, 100mA, fully protected. 
Includes all components and hardware, 
no PCB or case-Add $1.50 for shipping 



$0.94 
.90 
.79 
.90 

.99 
.99 

3/S1 
2/S1 

S1B.95 

4.40 
1.50 
3.00 

SI. 20 

.99 

1.25 

3/S1 

S1.00 



$13.95 



1N270 
IN 823 

1N914 

1N3044 
1N3045 
1N3071 

2N2915 

2N3819M 

2N4020 

2N4445 

2N5394E 
2N5S12 
2N6028 
2N6449 

CP640 



Germanium Diode 80V 200mA 

Temp Comp Reference 

6.2V*5%- .005%/ C 

Silicon Diode 100V 10mA 

100V Zener 1UV-Bett*r than an DB3 

1 10V Zener IW-Better than an OB2/OC3 

200V 100mA Switching Diode 40ns 

NPN Qua! Transistor 3m V Match jIOQ 
N Channel RF FET 1 DOMHz Amp 
PNP Dual Transistor 5m V Match .250 
ATChanneJ FET Slj Swrtch 

Ultra-Low Norse J FET Audio Amp 
Dual J FET RF Off Amp to 300MHz 

Programmable Unijunction Transistor 
300 Volt H Channel J-FET Amp/Sw 



Broadband FET RF Amp 140dB 

Dyn Range 
E304 N-Channel RF FET 3.8dB NF @400MH| 

MPSA12 NPN Darlington Transistor ,20,000 
TIS8B N-Channel FET 400MHz RF Amp 

RESISTOR Kit-150 pes %W, 20 most common values, 
individually packaged, 5 to 20 pes each . 

PC BOARD Mounting Ktt-B ea spacer, screw, nut 
and washer-32 pes total. 



4/S1 

S0.60 

25/81 

.75 

.IB 

.30 

$1.95 

.35 

500 

3.50 

$1.25 
2.90 

.45 
2.00 

$4.50 

.50 
.75 
.60 

$4.95 

$1.00 



SEND FOR ADVA'S NEW 1979 CATALOG 
NEARLY 1000 SEMICONDUCTORS, KITS, CAPACITORS, ETC.-SEND 25tf STAMP. 




*"A24 



ELECTRONICS 



BOX 4181 GB 
WOODSIDE, CA 94062 

TeU415) 328-1500 



186 



MOTOROLA 4 MHZ XTAL OSCIL- 
LATOR 14 (An dip pkg., 5 VDC In, 4 
MHz out. TTL compatible. $5.95 ea. 

NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR - 6 
DIGIT CLOCK MDOULE a 12-hr. 

clock featuring alarm and snooze alarm 
function, Comes complete with every- 
thing, All you add is a power cord and 
switches. Each module utilizes discreet 
components and Is ready for you to mount 
in your enclosure. Display Is 6 each seven 
segments, .33 inches high, dcckchip Is 
MM5375. Can easily be mounted In either 
of our Instrument clock case kits. (14.95. 



f il ia l <w m wi jr 





CALCULATOR GUTS 

Experimenter's delight. Each keyboard 
includes a monolithic calculator chip and 
display, These are rejects. It might be 
something simpje to repair or it could be 
very nasty. At this price, who cares! 9 
volt. $1 .SO ea. 3/S3.00. 




INSTRUMENT CLOCK CASE KIT 

A real jewel for those small projects, 
Hinged top door allows you to hide your 
control area, O.D. AW x 4 11 x 1W\ 
$1.99 each. 

DB 25 FEMALE CONNECTOR 

A unique assembly originally adapting the 
FS232 Type Connector to fiat cable, $1 .50 
each or 2/S2.50, 




INSTRUMENT/CLOCK CASE KIT 

Perfect for your opto projects. Solid 
aluminum construction with real walnut 
sides O.D. 5-3/6" by 5-3/8" by 2'\ 
$6.95 ea. 



bO 20fc 

30 



EDGE CARD CONNECTOR 

CJnch Jones 10/20 Pins. .156 Spacing 
PC Mount. .85 Bumdy 22/44 Pins, .166 
spacing PC Mount, $1.40 each. 




> ■ . J ki La 



; 


I* 

1 «* 

1 mu 


■ * 



DEFECTIVE CALCULATORS 

Well, some are and some are not. We 
can't afford the time to test them. 12.50 
ea. Batteries not included. 2/M.OQ. 




Electronic 




^-ua 



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Corp, Hdqts,, 2322 1st Ave., Seattle, Wash, 9B121 • (20G] G82-5025 




LINE PRINTER HAMMER DRIVER 

BOARD Each board contains appro*. 
130 each #MJE800 (Silicon Darlington 
NPN hfe 750, 1,5A). About $130.00 
worth, over 100 1 N4001 diodes, plus 
support chips. The whole package is yours 
for onty (14.95. 

HURRY, WE DON'T EXPECT THESE TO 

LAST VERY LONG! 




TRANSFORMER Pri. no vac sec. 

1 1 .2 and 5 VCT @ .1 amp. $,05 ea. 

MINIATURE D.P.DJ. [PUSH BUT 

TON] momentary, rated 6A/125 VAC, 
microswitch part #8N2021. Only $1,54. 

CLOCK DISPLAY 

National Semi. 6 Digit Multiplexed Dis- 
play; .33 1p Characters (Common Cath- 
ode). A REAL BUY AT JUST $1.00. 

EDGE METER too-r>ioo ua i/2 ,h by 

11/16", Compare with other meters 
costing $600. Only $2.00 ea. Why pay 
more? 

DIODE SALE 1N4148 

1 ™ $ ,1£ 5 ,. TAPE/ REEL 



DIODES 
TYPE 
1N4001 
1 N4002 
1N4Q03 
1 N40O4 
1N4005 
1N4GQ6 
1N4O07 
1N5400 
1 N5401 
1 N5402 
1 N5403 
1 N5404 
1 N5405 
1 N5406 
1 N5407 
1 N5408 
1N4148 



VOLTS 

50 

100 

200 

400 

600 

800 

1000 

50 

100 

200 

300 

400 

500 

600 

800 

1000 

75 



WATTS 

1A 

1A 

1A 

1A 

1A 

1A 

1A 

3A 

3A 

3A 

3A 

3A 

3A 

3A 

3A 

3A 
10M 



PRICE 

15/S1.00 

15/$1,00 

12/S1.00 

12/$1 

10/S1 

10/S1 

6/$1 

5/$1 

5/$1 

5/$1 

4/51.25 

4/ $1.25 

4/ $1.49 

4/ $1.49 

3/ $1.49 

2/$ .99 

20/$1 .00 



.00 
.00 
.00 
,00 
00 
00 
,25 



%« 



SOLID 


DIPPED 


TANTALUM 


CA- 


PACITORS 




1-99 100 PLUS 


.1 X35VOLT 


.23 


.19 


.15 




35 


,23 


.19 


.22 




35 


,23 


.19 


■ JiJ 




35 


23 


.19 


.47 




35 


.23 


.19 


,68 




35 


.23 


.19 


1 + 




35 


,25 


,20 


1.5 




35 


.29 


.23 


2,2 




35 


.31 


.25 


3,3 




■OD 


,36 


.29 


4.7 




35 


.38 


-30 


6.8 




35 


.50 


.40 


10.0 




35 


.60 


.48 


15.0 




35 


.79 


.63 


22,0 




35 


1,39 


1.12 


33.0 




35 


2.08 


1.66 


47,0 




35 


2.65 


2.12 



VALUES AND QUANT. MAY SE 
ASSORTED TO ATTAIN QUANT. PRCING 



NYLON TIE WRAPS 



3" 


65000 


4" 


65002 


5.3 s ' 


65003 


6.9" 


65004 


10.8" 


65005 


13.0" 


65006 


14.4" 


6S0S5 


SCREW 


MOUNT 


13.6" 


65054 


7,4" 


65052 


5.8" 


65051 


4.4 TP 


65050 



10/$ 

10/ 

10/ 

10/ 

10/ 

10/ 

10/ 

10/ 
10/ 
10/ 
10/ 



30 

.50 

.59 

,69 

1.59 

2.69 

2.96 

4.29 
.98 
.89 
,75 




GALLIUM PHOSPHIDE LE.O.'s 

Provide greater light out- put, brighter 
colors, greater uniformity and less current 
drain than regular L.E.D.'s 
.110 DIAMETER 



P/N 724H 


Red Diffused 


Ai $1.00 


724G 


Green Diffused 


4/ 1,19 


724Y 


Yellow Diffused 


4/ 1,49 


7240 


Orange Diffused 


At 1.49 


.220 DIAMETER 




71 4H 


Red Diffused 


5/S1 .19 


7143 


Green Diffused 


4/ 1.49 


71 4 Y 


Yellow Diffused 


4/ 1,59 


7140 


Orange Diffused 


4/ 1.59 


,220 DIAMETER {low dome) 




704R 


Red Diffused 


4/$1 ,59 


704G 


Green Diffused 


4, 1.65 


704Y 


Yellow Diffused 


4/ 1.B4 


7040 


Orange Diffused 


4/ 1.84 


101 R-g 


Dual (Red and Green) 




$2,85 


2/5.00 


MOUNTING 


HARDWARE 




.220 Diameter #7aMH 


12/S1.44 



% WATT 5% DEPOSITED CARBON FILM RESISTOR ASSORTMENTS 



ASST, A lOeal OHM 1 .5 OHM 2 OHM 2.7 OHM 3 OHM 3.6 OHM 

4.7 OHM 5.6 OHM 6.8 OHM 8.2 OHM 100 pes $2.40 

ASST B 10 ea 10 OHM 12 OHM 15 OHM 18 OHM 22 OHM 27 OHM 

33 OHM 39 OHM 47 OHM 56 OHM 
ASST. C 10 ea 68 OHM 82 OHM 100 OHM 1 20 OHM 1 50 OHM 

180 OHM 220 OHM 270 OHM 330 OHM 390 OHM 
ASST D 10 ea 470 OHM 560 OHM 680 OHM 820 OHM 1 K 1 .2K 

1.5K1.8K2.2K2.7K 
ASST. E l0ea3,3K 3.9K 4,7K 5.6K 6,8K 8,2K 10K 12K 

15K 18K 
ASST. F 10ea22K 2/K 33K 39K 47K 56K 68K 82K 10QK 

120K 
ASST. G l0ea15OK 180K 220K 270K 330K 390K 470K 

560K 680 K 820K 
ASST. H 10ealM 1.2M 1 .5M 1 ,8M 2.2M 2.7M 3-3M 3.9M 

4.7M 5.6M 
ASST. ArH INCLUDES ALL RESISTOR ASSORTMENTS (800 pes} 



100 pes $2.40 

100 pes $2. 40 

100 pes $2, 40 

100 pes $2.40 

100 pes $2.40 

100 pes $2.40 

100 pes $2.40 
$14,95 ea 



m% I 1 1 I 

1 1 I L u 1 







m 



i 



PARTS BOARDS A great way to buy 
parts on a budget. We guarantee your 
money's worth. ONLY $1.00 ea. 

ROTRON WHISPER FAN #WR2H1 

3 Blade 4" Diameter 75CFM 115VAC. 
NET $17,00 YOUR PRICE $9.95 Wait 
now, these are not pull-outs or something 
like that, these are new! 

CLAIREX PHOTO CELLS 

These have a real USEFUL ranpe to them. 
Any project Involving control from ambient 
light levels wiil utilize this photocell. Light 
resistance 1K, Fast response. .156 Diam- 
eter. $.75 each or 2/$1 .00. 

N0VUS CALCULATOR #824R 

Rechargeable Nl-Cad calculator WITH 
MEMORY, EX,CSAND % KEY. $4.05 aa, 
{owners manual and charger are not 
included) 

PLASTIC PARTS BOX A nice littie 
hinged-top box tor storing all your small 
parts. 0,d. 6%" by Z¥* M by 2'\ $.75 ea. 
10/S5.00. 




REPEAT OF A SELL-OUT a com- 
plete 12 hour digital clock, Some are man- 
ufacture line rejects, some are returns, 
and some are just scratched. Features; 
hours, minutes, alarm, snooze alarm. 
Parts value alone would equal $20,00, you 
pay only $6.00 ea. 

HOT DEALS 

75493N (quad seg. driver} . . 55 

V» 'I ^tO' f J i t r ■ * ■ + 4 il i 1 ft i 1 1 * * ♦ * * ■ i<bJ 

lOOOuf 25VDC P-C. 25 

2000uf 25VDC AXIAL * , .50 

18 ga. UN£ GOADS' , 25 

2N2222A ....4/1.00 

fcllVyj" - r r r r - m m ■ Itl-h-h4-h-fc1i4-ri -i J i i i I I W 

£VH3*J&V \ I L^JJ ******** **■ A T * *"# i * m m ■ w W 

MEMOREX 1" VIDEO TAPE Vz HOUR 
(with case) 4.95 

SIEMENS MAGNETIC SENSOR 1 .99 

43/43 GOLD EDGE CONN. .156 ,. . .4.95 
P/BMIN. 12 VDC RELAY D.P.DJ. , .1.99 

FREE BY POPULAR DEMAND 

With mln, purchase of $50.00, you will 
receive free, a 5 function National 
Semiconductor LCD, mens watch. With 
min. purchase of $100.00 you will receive 

free, our LCD. car clock, (watch and 
clock advertised in Dec, issue of 73 Mag.) 

For Master Charge/ Visa 

Orders Use Our 

TOLL FREE HOT LINE: 

1-800-426-0634 

for areas outside Washington 

(incl. Alaska & Hawaii] 



O.E.M J s WELCOME 



Terrn& All ordeai snipped promptly. Minimum ordser W.W, 
TelepUcmS <Jrde*s accepted. AH t>rdfrf3 shipped UPS or PP. AdS 
h'A asdra lor shipping & handling. Washington ESatarealdenlft 
aclcf addltloFvaf 5 4% ifllea lax. Master Cfca? ae fi Visa ca rd a ac- 
cepfed. Honojr Ofd*rS ^ ypur pei-sonal w company check are 
wvl^nw. Funds made pSyatMa in U.S. currency only, NoC-O.A. 
orders YfJiJf saUaJacllon is gyaranteed an aiLm#rdr>andp3* pgr. 
r-,:isr:J All metchandl&e subjeci tg-pn&r saJa.Open itcOwnl to 
9Dv5.ag*ncifrS $ publicly funded i&^OQlB, 



Store Hours M-F 9 6 . SAT 9-5 




P* Reader Service— see page 195 



187 



Social Events 



ffompaga 168 

John J uu I -Andersen VE7DTX, 
8802 Lakeview Dr.. Vernon. 
B.C., Canada V1B 1W3, or Lota 
Harvey VE7DKL, 584 Heather 
Rd., Penticton. B.C-, Canada 
V2A 1 W8. 

BOWLING GREEN OH 
JUL 2d 

The Wood County Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 15th aiv 
nual Wood County Ham-a-Rama 
on July 29, 1979, at the Bowling 
Green Fairgrounds, Bowling 
Green, Ohio. Gates will open at 
10:00 am T with free admission 
and parking. Dealer tables and 
space are available. Trunk sale 
space and food will also be 
available. Tickets are $1,50 in 
advance and $2.00 at the door. 
Prizes will be awarded. Talk-in 
on 32 K8TIH. For information, 
write Wood County ARC, c/o 
Eric Willman, 14118 Bishop 
Road, Bowling Green OH 43402. 

FLAGSTAFF AZ 
AUG 3-5 

The Amateur Radio Council 
of Arizona will hold its annual 
Ft. Tuthill Hamfest on August 
3*5, 1979; at Flagstaff, Arizona. 
Prizes include TS-520 trans- 
ceivers, a microwave oven, a 
Wilson Mark II HT, a Wilson 
System 111 triband antenna, and 
more, Featured will be a 
western barbecue, tech ses- 
sions, and exhibits. Camping 
facilities are also available. For 
further details or information, 
write Ft- Tuthill Hamfest, c/o 
8520 E. Edwards Ave., Scotts- 
dale AZ 85253. 

LITTLE ROCK AR 
AUG 4-5 

The Central Arkansas Radio 
Emergency Net (CAREN) Ama- 
teur Radio Club will hold its 
second annual Ham-a-Rama on 
Saturday and Sunday. August 
4-5, 1979, at the Arkansas State 
Fairgrounds, Little Rock, Arkan- 
sas. There will be two main 
prizes given, as well as door 
prizes. Featured will be forums, 
dealers* exhibits, a Saturday 
night party, and a large flea 
market. Talk-in on 146.34/.94. 
For details, send an SASE to 
Morris Middleton AD5M, 19Elm- 
herst Drive, Little Rock AR 
72209. 

JACKSONVILLE FL 
AUG 4 5 

The Jacksonville Hamfest 
Association is pleased to an- 
nounce the 1979 Jacksonville 
Hamfest and ARRL North Flor- 
ida Section Convention to be 
held on August 4-5, 1979, at the 
Jacksonville Beach Municipal 



Auditorium, Jacksonville, Flor* 
Ida. The location is Just one 
block from the beach, where 
U.S. 90 meets the sea. 

Advanced registrations are 
available at $3,00 per person 
from R. J. Cutting W2KGI/4, 303 
10th St., Atlantic Beach, Florida 
32233. Price at the door will be 

A large indoor swap area will 
be featured, with advance table 
reservations available for $5.00 
per table per day from Robbie 
Roberts KH6FMD/W4, 10557 At* 
lantic Blvd., #31, Jacksonville, 
Florida 32211, Information on 
exhibitors' booths and space 
are available from the same ad- 
dress. 

Other features and programs 
include statewide organization 
meetings on such topics as traf- 
fic nets and MARS, a micropro- 
cessor seminar, a solar power 
demonstration, a DX "pileup 11 
contest, a hidden transmitter 
hunt, an OSCAR forum, ARRL 
forums, emergency prepared* 
ness programs, DX and contest 
presentations, antenna and 
technical seminars, and much 
more. 

More general information 
may be obtained from JHA, 911 
Rio St Johns Dr., Jacksonville 
FL 32211. 

MT SINAI LI NY 
AUG 5 

The Radio Central Amateur 
Radio Ciub will hold its "Ham- 
Central" on Sunday, August 5, 
1979 (rain date is August 12, 
1979), at the Mt Sinai Elemen- 
tary School, Rte. 25A, Mt. Sinai, 
Long Island, New York. Admls* 
sion for sellers is $3,00 per 
tailgate space and $1.50 for 
buyers, with XYL and children 
under 12 free. Monies are to be 
used for Radio Central and the 
St, Charles Hospital Repeater, 
Doors will open at 7:00 am for 
sellers and 9:00 for others. They 
will close at 4:00 pm. Featured 
will be antenna advice with Art 
and Madeline Greenberg, a 
Novice table, great food, a CW 
contest, an ARRL table, a 
special event of a fly-in by the 
Suffolk County Police Dept, 
helicopter, and a Radio Central 
Club table. Talk-in on 146.52 
WA2UEC and 144.71/145.31 
K2VL. For information, call 
Joan Longtin at (516)-924-&438 
or Robin Goodman at (516)-744- 
6260, or write Radio Central, 
14 Ham -Central," PO Box 680, 
Miller Place NY 11764. 

SALEM OH 
AUG 5 

The second annual Salem 
Area Hamfest will be held on 
August 5, 1979, from 9:00 am to 
3:00 pm at the Kent State Saiem 



campus, Salem, Ohio. Tickets 
are $1,50 in advance and $2.00 
at the door. Inside tables are 
$5,00 with space for your own 
table at $2.00. Flea market 
space is $1.00. There will be air- 
conditioning, a wheelchair 
ramp, free parking, refresh- 
ments, and prizes, consisting of 
an Atias RX-110. TX-110, and a 
PS110. Talk-in on 146.52. For 
details, write Harry Milhoan 
WA8FBS. 1128 West State, 
Salem OH 44460. 

LEVELLANDTX 
AUG 5 
The Hockley County Ama- 
teur Radio Club and the North- 
west Texas Emergency Net will 
sponsor their 14th annual pic- 
nic and swapfest on Sunday, 
August 5, 1979, at the City Park, 
Levelland, Texas. A $2,00 
registration is requested but 
not required. Registration 
begins at 8:00 am and lunch will 
begin at 12:30 pm with a bring- 
your-own-picnic-basket lunch. 
There will be swapping all day 
with tables provided. Talk-in on 
146,28/m 

GLENN Ml 
AUG 5 
The Black River Amateur 
Radio Club will sponsor its 26th 
annual VHF Picnic and Swap 'n 
Shop on Sunday, August 5, 
1979. at the Allegan County 
Park, Glenn. Michigan, Take In- 
terstate 196 north of South 
Haven, Michigan, to the Glenn 
Exit. Door prizes will be award- 
ed. Bring the family and a pic- 
nic basket (no lunch will be pro- 
vided on the grounds) to enjoy 
the beach and playground. 
Talk-in on 147. 90/. 30 and 
146.52. For information, con- 
tact Ed Alderman WB8BNN, 
RR#2, Box 98AA, Bangor Ml 
49013, or phone (616)-427-8830. 

ANGOLA IN 
AUG 5 

The Steuben County Radio 
Amateurs will hold their annual 
F.M. Picnic and Hamfest on 
Sunday, August 5, 1979, at 
Crooked Lake, Angola, Indiana. 
There will be prizes, picnic- 
style barbecued chicken, in- 
side tables for exhibitors and 
vendors, and overnight camp- 
ing (fee charged by county 
park). Talk-in on 146,52 and 
147.81/.21. Admission is $2.00, 

MUNCIE IN 
AUG 11 

The Delaware Amateur Radio 
Association will hold its 2nd an- 
nual hamfest on Saturday, 
August 11, 1979, starting at 7:00 
am, at Spring water Park, Coun- 
ty Roads 300 E. and 100 N., Mun- 
cie, Indiana. Tickets are $1 .50 in 
advance and $2.00 at the gate- 
Reserved table space Is $1.00 
per table with no extra charge 
for outside space. There will be 
hourly drawings from 9:00 am 



until 3:00 pm, with the grand 
prize of a Tempo SYNCOM S1 
being drawn at 3:00 pm. Second 
prize will be a HAM 111 rotor. 
Talk-in on 146.25/.85 and 146.52/ 
♦52, For information or tickets, 
send money and an SASE to 
DARA, PO Box 3021, Muncie IN 
47302 

LEXINGTON KY 

AUG 12 

The Bluegrass Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its annual 
Central Kentucky Hamfest on 
August 12, 1979, at the Fasig- 
Tipton Sales Paddock, Newton 
Pike, Lexington, Kentucky. The 
program will include grand 
prizes, hourly door prizes, 
manufacturers' exhibits, an in- 
door/outdoor flea market, guest 
speakers, and forums. For infor- 
mation, contact the Bluegrass 
Amateur Radio Club, Inc., PO 
Box 4411, Lexington KY 40504 

PETOSKEY Ml 
AUG 18-19 

The Straits Area Radio Club 
will hold its Swap 'n Shop and 
hamfest on August 18-19, 1979, 
at Petoskey Middle School, 
State and Howard Streets, 
across from the Catholic 
church and post office, Petos- 
key, Michigan. There will be a 
donation of $2.00 at the door. 
Table space is also $2.00. 
Refreshments will be available. 
There will be a swap and shop 
on Saturday from 9:00 am to 
4:00 pm and on Sunday from 
9:00 am to 12:00 pm. Prizes, a 
ladies' program, and seminars 
at 1 1:00 am and 2:00 pm on Sat- 
urday will be featured. A ban- 
quet at the Holiday Inn on Sat- 
urday at 7:00 pm will have 
Mellish Reef DXpeditioner Bob 
Walsh WA8MOA as guest 
speaker. Banquet tickets are 
$7.50 and are limited to 200, 
sold in advance only, For full in- 
formation and lodging, send an 
SASE to Bill Moss WA8AXF t 
715 Harvey Street, Petoskey Ml 
49770, or phone (616^347*4734. 

ST. CHARLES II 
AUG 26 

The Fox River Radio League 
will hold its hamfest on Sunday, 
August 26. 1 979, at the Kane Co. 
Fairgrounds Exhibition Hall, St 
Charles, Illinois. Tickets are 
$1.50 in advance and $2.00 at 
the gate. For information, con- 
tact Martin Scbwamberger 
WB9TNQ r 1051 Northfield Drive, 
Aurora IL 60505. 

BEREA OH 
SEP 23 

The fourth annual Cleveland 
Hamfest will be held on Sunday, 
September 23, 1979, at the 
Cuyahoga County Fairgrounds, 
Berea, Ohio. The hamfest will 
be an all-indoor operation. 
There will be 10-foot booths 
available with an 8-foot table 
and two chairs for $30.00. 



188 




Ucense sTudy quicks & tapes 




Genera 
Class 

License 
Study 

Guide* 



rmmn 




AM 



**TfcUR_ 



RADIO 

sasp 



■Tiv> 



PCI 



• NOVICE STUDY GUIDE— SG7357— Here is a completely new study 

guide and reference book for the potential ham. This is not a ques- 
tion/answer memorization course. Electronic and radio fundamentals are 
presented and explained in an easy-to-und erst and fashion, preparing the 
beginner for the Novice exam. Includes the latest FCC amateur regula- 
tions, as well as application forms. Easily the best path into the exciting 
world of ham radio! $4.95/ 

• GENERAL CLASS STUDY GUIDE— SG7358-A complete theory course 
for the prospective General or Technician, This reference explains trarv 
sistor, amplifier, and general radio theory, while preparing the Novice for 
the "big" ticket. After getting your ticket, you'll use this guide again and 
again as an electronic reference source. Not a questiontenswer guide that 
becomes dated when the FCC updates the amateur exams. $5*95.* 

• ADVANCED CLASS STUDY GUIDE— SG 1081 — Ready to upgrade your license? To prevent retaking the FCC theory exam, you 
need the 73 Advanced theory guide. SSB, antenna theory, transmitters, and electronics measuring techniques are covered in 
detail in this easy-to-follow study guide. Special modes and techniques, such as RTTY, are also treated. An engineering degree is 
not necessary to master Advanced theory— try this book before visiting the examiner's office! $595, r 

• EXTRA CLASS LICENSE STUDY GUIDE— SG 1080— Before going for your 1 x 2 call, it pays to be a master of the Extra class 
electronic theory. This study guide is the logical extension of the 73 theory course. All the theory necessary to pass the exam is 
presented. Antennas, transmission lines, swr are discussed, as well as noise, propagation, and specialized communication 
techniques. This book is not a classroom lecture or memorization guide, but rather a logical presentation of the material that must 
be understood before attempting the Extra exam- Save yourself a return trip to the FCC and try the 73 method first! $5.95.* 



*S5?S£CL 

:2j«i5fc**"- 



7J NOVICE A 




NOVICE THEORY TAPES 

Startling Learning Breakthrough 

• NOVICE THEORY TAPES— CT7300— Startling Learning Breakthrough. YouH be astounded at how 
really simple the theory is when you hear it explained on these tapes. Three tapes of theory and one of 
questions and answers from the latest Novice exams give you the edge you need to breeze through 
your exam, 73 is interested in helping get more amateurs, so we're giving you the complete set of our 
tapes for the incredibly low price of ONLY $15.95.* 

Scientists have proven that you learn faster by listening than by reading because you can play a 
cassette tape ovef and over in your spare time— even while you're driving! You get more and more info 
each time you hear it. 

You can't progress without solid fundamentals. These four hour-long tapes give you all the basics 
youll need to pass the Novice exam easily. You'll have an understanding of the basics which will be 
Invaluable to you for the rest of your life! Can you afford to take your Novice exam without first listen- 
ing to these tapes? Set of 4—815.95/ 




SSTV 



• SLOW SCAN TELEVISION 

TAPE— CT7S50— Prize-winning 
programs from the 73 SSTV 
contest. Excellent for Demo! 
$5.95/ 





73 CODE SYSTEM TAPES 



JJCOO€ tOURSt 

m 



u /t 






Any Four Tapes For S 15.95! 
$4.95 Each!* 



it 



GENESIS 



5 WPM— CT73Q5— This Is the beginning 
tape for people who do nol know the code 
31 all, H lakes them through the 26 leiiers, 
10 numbers and necessary punctuation, 
complete wilh practice every step of the 
way using the newest blitz teachma tech- 
niques, It is almost miracuFous! in one 
hour many people— including kids of ten 
— are able to master the code. The ease of 
learning gives confidence to beginners 
who might otherwise drop out. 

"THE STICKLER" 

6+ WPM— CT7306— This is the practice 
tape (or the Novice and Technician li- 
censes. It Is made up of one solid hour of 



code, sent at the of t Iclal FCC standard (no 
other tape we've heard uses these stan- 
dards, so many people flunk the code 
when they are suddenly — under pressure 
—faced with characters sent at 13 wpm 
and spaced for S wpm). This tape is not 
memorizable, unlike the 2a ny 5 wpm tape, 
since the code groups are entirely random 
characters sent in groups of five. 



"THE CANADIAN" 

10+ WPM— CT7310— 73 hasnt forgotten 
the Canadian hams— our 10 WPM tape 
prepares you to breeze through your coun- 
try's licensing exams. Like the other code 
groups, the tape Is not memorable and, 
once mastered, provides a margin of safe- 
ty in the actual lext situation. 



"BACK BREAKER" 

13+ WPM — CT7313-Code Groups 
again, at a brisk 13 per so you will be at 
ease when you sit down in tront of the 
steely-eyed government inspector and he 
starts sending you plain language at only 
13 per. You need this etira margin to over- 
come the panic which is universal in the 
lesl situations. When you've spent your 
money and time to take the test, you'll 
thank heavens you had this back-breaking 
tape 



<i 



COURAGEOUS 11 



20+ WPM— CT7320— Code in what gets 
you when you go for the Extra class li- 
cense. It is so embarrassing to panic out 
just because you didn t prepare yourself 
with this tape. Though this is only one 
word faster, the code groups are so diffi- 
cult that you'll almost Fall asleep copying 
the FCC stuff by comparison. Users report 
that they can't beJieve how easy 20 per 
realty is with this fantastic one hour tape. 



"OUTRAGEOUS" 

25+ WPM— CT7325— This Is the tape for 
that small group of overachleving hams 
who would n i be content to simply satisfy 
the code requirements ol (he Extra Class 
license. Ifs the toughest tape we've got 
and we keep a permanenl file of hams who 
have mastered it- Let us know when you're 
up to speed and we'll Inscribe your name 
in 73s CW "Hall of Fame." 




Use the order card m the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 

73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458. Be sure to include check of detailed credit card information, 

*Add $1.00 handling charge. Note; Prices subject to change on books not published by 73 Magazine, 



FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE CALL (603) 924-7298 



7$ TEchNICAl libRARy 



• BEHIND THE DIAL— 8K7307— By Bob Grove. Get more fun out 
of shortwave listening with this interesting guide to receivers, 
antennas, frequencies and interference. $4.95.* 

• THE CHALLENGE OF 160— BK7309— is the newest book in the 
73 technical library, dedicated to 160 meter operating. Si Dunn pro- 
vides all necessary information to gel started on this unique band. 
The all-important antenna and ground systems are described In 
detail. The introduction contains interesting photos of Stew 

Perry's (the King of 160) shack. This reference is a must for new 
and experienced "Top Band" operators. PTice: $4.95.* 

• IC OP-AMP COOKBOOK— BK1028— by Walter G. Jung, Covers 
not only the basic theory of the IC op amp in great detail, but also 
includes over 250 practical circuit applications, liberally il- 
lustrated. 592 pages, 5V 2 x 8Vi, soHbound. $12.95.* 





• INTRODUCTION TO RTTV-BK7380— A beginner's guide to 
radioteletype including teletypewriter fundamentals, signals, 
distortion and RTTY art. You can be a RTTY artist! A 73 publica- 
tion. $2.00.* 

• THE NEW RTTY HANDBOOK-8K7347-is a new edition and 
the only up-to-date RTTY book available. The state of the art has 
been changing radically and has made all previous RTTY books ob- 
solete. It has the latest circuits, great for the newcomer and expert 
alike. $5.95.* 

• PROPAGATION WIZARDS HANDBOOK— BK7302— by J. H. 

Nelson, When sunspots riddled the worldwide communications 
networks of the 1940*3, John Henry Nelson looked to the planets 
for an answer. The result was a theory of propagation forecasting 
based upon interplanetary alignment that made the author the 
most reliable forecaster in America today, The book provides an 
enlightened look at communications past, present, and future, as 
well as teaching the art of propagation forecasting, $6.95.* 



• SSB . . . THE MISUNDERSTOOD MODE— BK7351— by James B, 

Wilson. Single Sideband Transmission , , , thousands of us use it 
every day, yet it remains one of the least understood facets of 
amateur radio. J* B. Wilson presents several methods of sideband 
generation, amply illustrated with charts and schematics, which 
will enable the ambitious reader to construct his own sideband 
generator. A must for the technically-serious ham. $5.50.* 

• SSTV HANDBOOK— BK7354(hardcover} ( BK7355(softcover)— 
This excellent book tells all about it, from its history and basics to 
the present state-of-the-art techniques. Contains chapters on cir- 
cuits, monitors, cameras, color SSTV, test equipment and much 
more, Hardbound $7-00. softbound $5.00.* 

• WEATHER SATELLITE HANDBOOK-BK7370-Simple equip- 
ment and methods for getting good pictures from the weather 
satellite. Antennas, receivers, monitors, facsimile you can build, 
tracking, automatic control (you don't even have to be home). Dr. 
Taggart WB80QT.S4.95/ 





-ANTENNAS 



• 73 DIPOLE AND LONG-WIRE ANTENNAS-BK1016— by Ed- 
ward M. Noll W3FOJ. This is the first collection of virtually every 
type of wire antenna used by amateurs. Includes dimensions, con- 
figurations, and detailed construction data for 73 different anten- 
na types. Appendices describe the construction of noise bridges, 
line tuners, and data on measuring resonant frequency, velocity 
factor, and swr. $5.50.* 

• 73 VERTICAL, BEAM AND TRIANGLE ANTENNAS— BK1069- 
by Edward M. Noll W3FGJ. Describes 73 different antennas for 
amateurs. Each design is the result of the author's own ex- 
periments covering the construction of noise bridges and antenna 
tine tuners, as well as methods for measuring resonant frequency, 
velocity factor, and standing-wave ratios. 160 pages. $5,50/ 

• VHF ANTENNA HANDBOOK-BK7368— The NEW VHF Anten- 
na Handbook details the theory, design and construction of hun- 
dreds of different VHF and UHF antennas ... A practical book 
written for the average amateur who takes joy in building, not full 
of complex formulas for the design engineer. Packed with 
fabulous antenna projects you can build. $4,95.* 



Use the order card in the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 

73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458. Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information. 

'Add $1.00 handling charge. Note: Prices subject to change on books not published by 73 Magazine, 



A 



JULSYUL- 



im 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



TEST EQUIPMENT 



• RF AND DIGITAL TEST EQUIPMENT YOU CAN 
BUILD— BK1044— Rf burst, function, square wave generators, 
variable length pulse generators— 100 kHz marker, i-f and rf sweep 
generators, audio osc, af/rf signal injector, 146 MHz synthesizer, 
digital readouts for counters, several counters, prescaler, 
microwave meter, etc, 252 pages, $5.95** 

• VOL I COMPONENT TESTERS— LB7359— , ,, how lo build 
transistor testers (8), diode testers (3), \C testers (3) r voltmeters 
and VTVMs (9). ohmmeters (8 different kinds), inductance (3), 
capacity (9), Q measurement, crystal checking (6), temperature (2), 
aural meters for the blind (3) and all sorts of miscellaneous data on 
meters , , , using them, making them more versatile, making stan* 
dards, Invaluable book. $4:95/ 

• VOL II AUDIO FREQUENCY TESTERS- LB7360— . . , jam 
packed with all kinds of audio frequency test equipment. If you're 

Into SSB, RTTY, SSTV P etc., this book is a must for you ... a good 
book for hi-fi addicts and experimenters, too! $4.95.* 

• VOL. Ill RADIO FREQUENCY TESTERS— LB7361— Radio frequency waves, the common denominator of Amateur Radio. 
Such items as SWR t antenna impedance, line impedance, rf output and field strength; detailed instructions on testing these 
items includes sections on signal generators, crystal calibrators, grid dip oscillators, noise generators, dummy loads and 
much more. $4.95.* 

• VOL IV IC TEST EQUIPMENT— LB7362— Become a troubleshooting wizard! In this fourth volume of the 73 TEST EQUIP- 
MENT LIBRARY are 42 home construction projects for building test equipment to work with your ham station and in servicing 
digital equipment. Plus a cumulative index for all four volumes of the 73 TEST EQUIPMENT LIBRARY. $4,95.* 




tIie WEli-EQuippEd Uam shAck 



• 73 MAGAZINE BINDERS— Preserve and 

protect your collection for your lifetime! 
There's no excuse for tost issues when you 
have these handsome red binders with 
gold lettering. Order 1 — BN 1001— for 
$6.50*: 2 or more— BN1002— for $6.00 
each.* (specify 1978 or 1979 binders) 

• QSL CARDS— 73 turns out a fantastic 
series of QSL cards at about half the cost 
of having them done elsewhere because 
they are run as a fill-in between printing 
books and other items in the 73 Print Shop. 
250 Style W— QW0250— for $8.95*; 500 
Style W— QW0500— for $13.95*; 250 Style 
X— QX0250— for $8.95*; 500 Style X— 
QX0500— for $13.95*; 250 Style Y— QY0250 
-for $8.95*; 500 Style Y— QY0500— for 
Si 3.95.* 





Style X 



Style Y 




rasa/i 



Style W 



• HOW TO BUILD A MICROCOMPUTER — 
AND REALLY UNDERSTAND IT-BK7325 
— by Sam Creason, The electronics hobby- 
ist who wants to build his own microconv 

?uter system now has a practical M How- 
o" guidebook. Sam Creason's book is a 
combination technical manual and pro- 
gramming guide that takes the hobbyist 
step-by-step through the design, construc- 
tion, testing and debugging of a complete 
microcomputer system. This book is must 
reading for anyone desiring a true under- 
standing of computer systems, $9.95.* 

• NEW REPEATER ATLAS OF THE EN- 
TIRE WORLD- BK7345— 150% as big as 
any list ever available — nearly 900 more 
repeaters listed. New improved maps 
show the locations by frequency of every 
repeater in the States. Only $1.95.* 

• BACK ISSUES— Complete your collec- 
tion; many are prime collectables now, 
classics in the field! A full collection is an 
invaluable compendium of radio and elec- 
tronics knowledge! 

Single back issue— ST0000— 

$3.00*; 

25 our choice— ST2500— $ 12,00*; 

25 your choice— ST2501 —$25.00*; 

5 your choice— ST0500— $8.50*; 

10your choice— ST1 000— $14.00/ 



• OWNER REPAIR OF AMATEUR RADIO EQUIPMENT— BK7310— Frank Glass shares over 40 years of operating, servicing, 
and design experience in this book. There are several books and numerous articles available on the subject of repairs to elec- 
tronic equipment. The information within these books ranges from the elementary to the highly technical written for the top 
engineers in the field. But this book stands out from the rest in that it is written in narrative style aimed at conveying the con- 
cept of electronic servicing. A written discussion of how components work and how they are combined to provide communica- 
tion equipment is used to help the reader understand the concepts required to service station equipment. $7.95.* 

• A GUIDE TO HAM RADIO— BK7321 — by Larry Kahaner WB2NEL. What's Amateur Radio all about? You can learn the basics 
of this fascinating hobby with this excel lent beginner's guide. It answers the most frequently asked questions in an easy-going 
manner, and it shows the best way to go about getting an FCC license. A Guide to Ham Radio is an ideal introduction to a hobby 
enjoyed by people around the world. $4.95/ 

• LIBRARY SHELF BOXES— These sturdy white, corrugated, dirt-resistant boxes each hold a full year of 73 or Kilobaud Micro- 
computing. With your order, request self -sticking labels for any of the following: 73, Kilobaud Microcomputing, CQ, QST, Ham 
Radio, Personal Computing, Radio Electronics. Interface Age, and Byte, Order 1 — BX10OO— for $2,00 border 2-7— BX2002— for 
$1.50 each*; order 8 or more— BX 1002— for $1.25 each*. 

Use the order card in the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 

73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458. Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information. 

'Add $1,00 handling charge. Note: Prices subject to change on books nol published by 73 Magazine. 





That's the size of the world's 
most comprehensive guide to 
the subject of ham radio: 

18 years of 73 Magazine. 



The back issues of 73 are a gold mine of interesting articles. Unlike 
the other magazines, which fill their pages with activity reports, 
there's little to go stale in 73. You'll find pioneering articles on SSTV, 
FM, repeaters, ICs, and computers. Even the editorials are fun as 
Wayne Green's dire predictions, like the debacle of incentive licens- 
ing, have come to pass. 

Clip the coupon below and send for 73's new back issue catalogue. 
Treat yourself (or a friendly ham) to some fun, and a fantastic bargain 
to boot. 



□ YES! Rush me 73's FREE Back Issue Catalogue! 




Address 
City _ 



State 




ma g azine 

PETERBOROUGH NH 03458 



P 



192 




jlutu£_ / f ' ' 



I 



I 

I 



ALL NEW 1979 

REPEATER ATLAS 

OF THE WORLD 



■■.■■■■if.ify. 



WORLD 



AJUS 









The all new 1979 Repeater Atlas is now available as a 
resuft of the cooperation of hundreds of individuals, 
repeater groups, and coordinators. This is the largest 
atlas available anywhere. It includes 234 pages, 50 
location maps, over 4,500 stations, and 9,000 entries, 
In a new, easy-to-use format indexed by location and 
frequency. Call Toll Free (800) 258-5473; have your 
credit card handy and order your 1979 Repeater Atlas 
today. $4.95 

gjS magazine 

Peterborough NH 03458 




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propagation 



by 

J. H. Nelson 



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P = Poor 

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193 



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SSSCslSlSSSl® Peterborough, n-h. 03458 





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A46 ABC Communications. 40 G6 

A1 Adirondack Radio Supply 106 

A24 Ad va Electronics. ...... . 186 G1G5 

A94 Advanced Electronic Applica C119 

lions. .. 151 C67 

Advance Electronics .145 C140 

A60 AEO Electronics 10 

A92 AHF Antennas 153 D6 

A2 Aldelco. .. .184 D35 

A95 Amateur Electronics Supply/ D49 

A96 Amateur Radio Center/Alias, 49 

ASS Amateuf Radio Supply , 108 D23 

A40 Amat. Radio Supply of Nashville. D25 

FHwi l I i LllllllAfttiiJiha l j. ■ m i l 1 lr 

A56 American Crystal Supply 152 

A28 Amidon Associates .,..133 

Amsat 64 E43 

A62 Antenna Specialists. , . 95 

A81 AP Industries. ,., 15 F5 

AS Aptron Laboratories. 10 G12 

Associated Radio, ISO G26 

A16 Alias Radio Inc 31 G22 

A93 Avanti R&D *S G4 

923 BarkerVVillfamscn ISO H4Q 

B49 J S. Bells Company 136 

B45 B S K Precision. .. 25 H24 

842 Brodie Electronics Company 150 h2 

88 BuUet Etectromcs. 176, 177 

B30 Burghardt Amateur Center/ H16 

Atlas 45 H8 

C88 C ft A Electronics Enterprises. 75 H26 

C3 Clegg 77 115 H5 

C21 Cotkn 15 H3 

C 106 Command Productions 143 H4 

C58 Communications Center. n 

NE 81, lit 132 

C5 Communications Etec 143 19 

C11S Communications Elec Special ji 

lies ...,.—.;.........,,... T53 J2 

C89 Communications Services 166 



Communications Specialists 

16, 17 
Communications S TV Unltdl50 
Cook Communications CorpHO 

Cushcrafi 24 

CW Electronics Sales Cor* 

Atlas S3 

Paler W Dab! Company 35 

Daylapro Electronics, Inc 10 

Deltroniks 152 

Digital Research Corporal ion 

.174, 175 

Dovetron 107 

DSI Instruments. . . 137. 139, 141 

Eagle Electronics . .... 106 

Ehrhorn Technological Opera- 
tions, Inc 149 

Electronics International Service 

Corp'Alias . 59 

Flesh er Corporation. 95 h 104, 105 
German town Amateur Supply 44 
G & G Radio Electronics Co 136 
G.I-S.M.O.. 104 

God bout Electronics 178 

HAL Communications Corpora- 



131, 



21 
82 

143 

173 
. 10 
143 
11 
.63 

Hy Gam . 25 

ICOM 23, 119 

Instant Software 84. 65 93 

integrated Circuits, Unltd 185 
Jameco Electronics 101, 179 

Jan Crystals. 150 

Kenwood CIV, 5. 134, 135 



tion . 

Hal-Troni* 

Ham Radio Center 

10,15,73.90,95, 
Hamlronics, NY. 

Hamtronics r PA. 

Hartw ell's Office Wortd 

Healh 

Henry Radio. CI I 



K14 

■ 

K4 

L9 

M48 

M35 

M36 

M96 

M52 

M69 

M95 

M92 

M57 
05 
03 
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P41 
P44 



P2 

P47 

03 

Rl 



R3 

R27 

S27 

S63 

S33 

581 
S8 

StO 
S50 
ST8 



Key Electronics. 95 

Kilobaud 83 

KLM Eleclfontcs. 136 

Little Rock Ham O Rama 136 
Long's Electronics. 120-125 

rvtacrotrontcs, Inc 143 

Madison Electronics Supply 70. 71 
Mac-glore Electronic Lab, , 16/ 

Mem ken Distribution 104 

MFJ Enterprises 27, 62, 103 

Micro Control Specialties, , 152 
Micro Management Systems143 
J.W Miller Div. Bell Industries 

-iBrriiiiaij • ■ ■ ■ ■ v f r ■ £^| I Qu 

Monroe Electronics. 118 

OK Machine* Tool ,89 

Optoelectronics, Inc 24. 164 

Outdoor Outti Iters ,. 133 

Palomar Engineers. 9B 

PC. Electronics 107 

Pickering Codemaster Company 

,.,,.. 67 

Plainsman Mico Systems. .91 
Poly Paks. 181 

Professional Aids Co 105 

Quest Electronics 169 

Radio Amateur Callbook, Inc 183 
Radio Bookshop. 15 

Radio World 95 

Ramsey Electronics 172 

RF Power Labs T inc 1 52 

Sabtronics 170 

Semiconductors Surplus. 171 
S-F Amateur Radio Services 

15,153 
SpecHonics, Inc 52. 166 

Spectrum Communications 

78,79 

SST Electronics . 153 

OC Stafford Electronics. 10 
Standard Communications. . 90 



S43 
S44 

T52 

* 

T55 
T34 

T34 

T48 



T1B 
T3 

U10 

U2 

U9 

U8 
U6 

V23 

W15 

Wlfl 

W2 

X3 

Y1 

From 



Surplus Electronic s *82 

Swan Eleclromcs. 8 9 

Tete-Tow'r Mfg. Co ., Inc t5l 

Ten -Tec. 7. 97 

TETU,SA 113 

Tnomas Communications 109 

Thomas Communicalions/AUas 
_ 41 

Tower Electronics Corp 

2b 105, 107, T18 

R, Lee Tower International. , . 152 
Trac Electronics, Inc 98 

Tufts Radio Electronics . ,80. 90 
UDM Enterprises .95 

Unarco-Rchn , ......... 106 

UnadlHafRsyco Division. , 25, 133 

United Products 187 

Universal Amateur Radio Service, 
inc......... . . 1 In 

Valor Enterprises 15 

Wacom H8 

Western Electronics 107 

Wilson Electronics 3 

XUex Corp 52 

Yaesu Electronics Corporation 
... CM. 65, 99 

73 Paces 131, 189-194 



*Re«der Service inquires not honored. 
Please contact advertiser directly. 



BK1016 

ST0000 

ST2500 

ST0500 

ST1000 

ST2S01 

8 K 7307 

BN1001 

BN1002 

BK7309 

CT7305 

CT7306 

CT7310 

CT7313 

CT7320 

CT7325 

CT7394 

BK7321 

BK7310 

BK1028 

BK7380 

CT7300 

BK7302 

QW0250 

QW0500 





..... 



*«*.... 



73 OIPOLE & LONG WIRE ANTENNAS. . . 

f J LJ r\ \^ l\ 1 1^ ^P vF 1^ *** + c##**B#p-4*»«*«**a»-««» 

73 BACK ISSUES— 25 OUR CHOICE 

73 BACK ISSUES— S YOUR CHOICE 

73 BACK ISSUES— 10 YOUR CHOICE. . . . 
73 BACK ISSUES— 25 YOUR CHOICE. . , . 

BEHIN D THE DIAL 

BINDER— 73— 1.. .... 

BINDER— 73— 2&UP 

CHALLENGE OF 160 

CODE TAPE— 5 WPM.. 
CODETAPE-6 + WPM,*..* 
CODE TAPE-10 + WPM. . . . 
CODETAPE-13 + WPM.... 

CODE TAPE— 20 + WPM 

CODE TAPE— 25 + WPM 

CODE TAPES (ANY FOUR ABOVE) 

GUIDE TO HAM RADIO 

OWNER REPAIR OF AMATEUR RADIO 

EQUIPMENT 

1C OP AMP COOKBOOK 

INTRO TO RTTY.*. 

NOVICE THEORY TAPES. „ 
PROPAGATION WIZARD'S HANDBOOK 

QSL CARDS— STYLE W— 2S0. . # , 

QSL CARDS— STYLE W— 500. 



* r r r 



********* 



*****•**. 



* $ 5.50 
.$ 3.00 
.$12.00 
»S 6 50 
,$14,00 
. $25.00 
.$ 4.95 
.$ 6.50 

$ 6.00 
.$ 4.95 

$ 4.95 
*$ 4.95 

S 4.95 
.$ 4.95 

5 4.95 
. S 4.95 
.$15.95 
.$ 4.95 



* * * • • 



* • < * • 



* * » * 



7,95 
.$12.95 
.$ 2*00 
.$15.95 
.$ 6.95 
. $ 8.95 
.$13.95 



QX0250 

QX0500 

OY0250 

QY0500 

BK7345 

BK1044 

BK7347 

BX1000 

BX1001 

BX1002 

BK7351 

BK7354 

BK7355 

CT7350 

SG10S1 

SG1080 

SG7358 

SG7357 

LB7359 

LB7360 

LB7361 

LB7362 

BK1069 

BK7368 

BK7370 



QSL CARDS— STYLE X— 250. * * . . $ 8.95 

QSL CARDS— STYLE X— 500. $13.95 

OSL CARDS —STYLE Y— 250 * $ 8.95 

OSL CARDS— STYLE Y-5Q0. $13.95 

n CrCA 1 tfi Ml LnD. .**«*»•*♦*.-..,.»*.*»* 1.9D 

RF DIGITAL TEST EQUIPMENT $ 5.95 

RTTY H AN DBOOK .....$ 5.95 

SHELF BOX— 1.... .........$ 2.00 

SHELF BOX— 2 $ 1.50 each 

SHELF BOX— 8 UP........ $ 1.25 each 

SSB THE MISUNDERSTOOD MODE $ 5.50 

SSTV HANDBOOK (HARDCOVER). .......$ 7.00 

SSTV HANDBOOK (SOFTCOVER) $ 5.00 

^'*J* I V 1 f\w mm* »*****•»*■* ■■■■■■•.»#■**»#■»#•##♦ -0.3-3 

STUDY GUIDE— ADVANCED CLASS. ..**.$ 5*95 

STUDY GUIDE— EXTRA CLASS $ 5.95 

STUDY GUIDE— GENERAL CLASS $ 5,95 

STUDY GUIDE— NOVICE CLASS $ 4.95 

TEST EQUIP LIB V1 — COMP TESTERS. . . . $ 4.95 
TEST EQUIP LIB V2— AUDIO TESTERS. ... $ 4.95 

TEST EQUIP LIB V3— RADIO EQUIP $ 4.95 

TEST EQUIP LIB V4— IC TEST EQUIP $ 4.95 

VERTICAL BEAM & TRIANGLE ANTNS. ... $ 5.50 

VHF ANTENNA HANDBOOK $ 4.95 

WEATHER SATELLITE HANDBOOK. .*.* /$ 4.95 



194 



I 



1 



MICROPROCESSOR CONTROLLED 
SYNTHESIZED HANDIE 



BNC Antenna Connector 



Squelch Control 



Audio Gain Control 



Condensor Mike 



5-Digit LEO Readout 



Keyboard Entry 




Keyboard Lock 



Clear /Busy Auto Scan Selector 



Repeater 'Simplex Offset Switch 



Remote Speaker/Mike input 



Channel Busy Lamp 



Transmit Indicator 



Display On/Off 



5 KHz Up 



The Yaesu FT-207R Synthesized Handle 
has alt the features you could want in a very compact package 



144-148 MHz Range 
10 KHz Steps 

3 Watts Output 

4 Memories plus Programmable Offset 
Priority Channel 

Memory and Band Auto Scan 
Optional Equipment: 



Keyboard Encoded Frequency Entry 

2 Tone (Touchtone® ) Input from Keyboard 

Keyboard Lock guards against accidental 

frequency change 

Odd Splits Can Be Programmed from Keyboard 

Automatic Battery Saver Feature for LED Display 

Rubber Flex Antenna 



Tone Squelch, Speaker/Mike, Nicads, Battery Charger 



o rmoi 



Price And Specifications Subject To 
Change Without Notice Or Obligation 




679X 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP., 15954 Downey Ave., Paramount, CA 90723 
YAESU ELECTRONICS Eastern Service rtr qui 9 



(213) 6334007 




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